Corn not so good, grubs new go to bait

Discussion in 'Bluegill Fishing' started by Ravensmavsfan, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    Today, out on a secret pond of mine, I landed about 18 bluegill in about 1 hour.I was using corn and these white things I call grubs. They have little brown heads and 6 little legs with a white translucent body. I find alot of them when digging around the yard for worms. They worked great. I landed all but 1 on the grubs, and even managed a smallmouth bass on one. The corn on the other hand was terrible. It landed one bluegill and I think I just snaged it since the hook was through the outer part of its gills. I watched some gills go right up to the corn, take a smell, then swim away. For now on I'll stick with the grubs and worms for gills.
     
  2. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    :confused: NEVER TRIED CORN FOR BLUGILL BEFORE. I ALWAY USE GOOD OLE WORMS FOR THEM .CORN FOR CARP WHICH I DON'T FISH FOR MUCH ANYMORE.
     

  3. eaglesfan00000

    eaglesfan00000 New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Virginia
    corn works better in creeks. I can catch as many creek chubs and sunfish as I want in a creek. But I only use spinners and worms for bluegill. Or crickets.
     
  4. Stevej

    Stevej New Member

    Messages:
    101
    State:
    East-central Mississippi
    Found this on another site and used it to sweeten my crappie jigs yesterday and it sure didn't hurt. I think his main use was brim fishing. Will try that too.

    I stumbled across a little trick that may help some of you. It's a proven winner, and I never fish without it.

    I buy a regular size bag of Kroger "salad" or "popcorn" shrimp, the small ones. I then cut each into four or five pieces, and cut up a couple of hundred like this. Then I put them in a plastic cup, add water and lots of salt (about as much salt as water), and let them sit in the regrigerator over night. Then I rinse them off, and store in a small Ziplock Snack Bag, the smallest size. I've tried all sorts of ways to store them, but the small bags are the best. You can easily keep 300+ pieces in one of these bags. Each Kroger bag makes hundreds and hundreds of shrimp. I've gotten as many as 1,000 when I cut them small, but I don't recommend this. A friend made the season one year on one Kroger bag, for less than $5.00. Just keep the salted shrimp bits in the regriferator and they will last forever. But...the fish take them so fast you might be surprised how quick they go!

    If you have special preferences you can doctor them up a little. You can add food colors, for example, if you wanted red shrimp, or a color that works well on a certain lake or pond. You can add garlic and other favorite flavors/scents if you like this. Larger shrimp bits seem to help the effectiveness of a plastic worm hook, if you like bass fishing.