Cormorants, Pelicans, Gulls

Discussion in 'Channel Catfish' started by crappieguy, Jul 26, 2007.

  1. crappieguy

    crappieguy New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    Manitoba , Canada
    Up here, My wife, son and I tend to do a lot of lake fishing for cats, even tho the Red River is notoriously famous.
    I just like lake fishing. We have some favorite large shore to deep water sand bar stretches that drop off into deeper water.Normally we watch for the above mentioned birds..if they're present or how far out they are and how fast they're moving in towards shore. We think that they're following the bait fish. So we can almost predict whether it's going to be a good lake day of fishing or a poor one just by watching the birds. If the birds are moving in closer as the day streches out into evening we just stay shore fishing. If the birds are a distance out and not moving in we take the boat out. Works for us..just thought someone else might want to try this. Have fun.
     
  2. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Take the time to find where they roost. The crap in the water also attracts cats. Its nothin but fish. LOL!
     

  3. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks for the tip. It's a good one. When fishing MTL, I also keep an eye on what the birds are doing. I will also run line beneath the cormorant's roosts, and catch fish every time. If birds aren't active, I usually don't catch as many fish possibly because I find it difficult to find the baitfish without the help of the birds. In big open water, it really does pay off to watch what the birds are doing.
     
  4. Redtick

    Redtick New Member

    Messages:
    303
    State:
    Neoga, Illinois
    Locally, I watch the blue herons. If I see several of them in an area, I fish it because they are there for the bait fish, the same reason the big cats will be there. A fellow can learn a lot about fishing from watching a heron, they are professional fishers.
    I watch for gulls out on the open water. They are often over a school of shad.
     
  5. Ol Man

    Ol Man New Member

    Messages:
    3,170
    State:
    Illinois
    It has been a weird year around here... no pelicans, no gulls and very few herons. Pelicans usually keep us awake with their thrashin'. Not this year...
     
  6. lil kat

    lil kat New Member

    Messages:
    208
    State:
    Illinois
    Thanks for all the info on the birds. I have never thought of this, but it sounds so very true to me and yu can count on me watching the birds from now on.:tounge_out:
     
  7. Love Them Cats

    Love Them Cats New Member

    Messages:
    454
    State:
    Vinita, Oklahoma
    I hadn't really thought much about the birds, until this year?
    The place we like to fish is along side a bridge. The last few years, there have been some kind of birds building nest under the ledge on the bridge and the fishing was pretty good?
    This year, the birds are not there (yet) and the fishing hasn't been that good?
    Last year I started to notice, if we saw deer on the way, we would do pretty good, if we didn't see any deer, we didn't do that good?

    I've always heard you can tell by other animals how the fish will be biting, but I didn't think much about it?

    This summer, I've been watching the squirrels at work. I arrive about 30 - 45 minutes before I start and sit there watching them. Some days, you wont see any, and if you do, they are just laying around.
    Other days, you see them everywhere, running up and down the tree's and fences looking for food and all I can think is, I'd rather be fishing then getting ready to start work?

    Ken
     
  8. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    What worked for me.Run with the wind at high speed toward a school of bait fish and a flock of birds.Cut your motor well before you get to them and drift into them while casting into them.Try to match the bait.I like the "00" & "0" clark spoon to match Saltwater Glass Minnows & 1" freshwater Shad.Keep a live bait rig handy for a 6-12-up to a 18 inch bait according to where you are fishing.Take one of the smaller fish that you can catch that are eating the bait and toss it out toward the edge of the school.A ultra lite spinning rig with a treble hook is great for snagging a small bait for a larger bait to take to catch a big one.I learned this at Santee and used it on saltwater.1 lb.up to 1000 lb.fish can often be found around a school of 1" bait fish with each size feeding on the smaller.DO NOT run the motor close to or into these schools or they will "sound" or go deep.When the bait disappears,just keep a eye out for the birds.On some of the "Best" days off of Tybee Island Georgia when the bait would "hold" on the surface,you could catch several hundred lbs.of fish per person per school.At times when you get in to 30-50 lb. fish,that ain;t many fish.You quit because you cain;t go no mo! Flocks of diving birds are into fish! Watch the Ospreys and Eagles also. I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  9. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Swallows build mud nest under bridges.When the little birds start to leave the nest,some land in the water.Animals and fish feed on them.At times fishing 6 " with a float downstream at night close to shore can be a killer.Bush lines set right on top of the water also.The cats will often have baby birds in them.Bass and Big Pickerel also eat them.I love you Brothers and Sisters peewee
     
  10. crappieguy

    crappieguy New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    Manitoba , Canada
    Thanks fellas for takin' the time to read and comment..wife and I are going up on the Red , tomorrow AM, heard from one of my friends he caught 23 in 4 1/2 hours using shrimp...I believe he said the largest was 34 inches and the smallest 24 inches. That's the plan any way...supposed to be 37 degrees celcius tomorrow.. I think that 's around 100 Deg F. Guess I'll need a hat.