Comparing sinkers

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by Catter, May 8, 2006.

  1. Catter

    Catter New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Osceola, Arkansas
    I've been using 8oz flat bank sinkers for the river here. Even with those if you are in the main current your rig will wind up down stream from where you cast it. Being the hardheaded fella I am instead of changing my anchor point/casting area I want to change my weights. I want to be able to cast that puppy to a spot and have it sit there. How would 8oz no-rolls compare to the fbs's ive been using? What about the "claw" sinkers? Any ideas guys?

    Joe
     
  2. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    if your in heavy current with a boat you want to fish downstream from your boat, never cross-current or upstream. if thats what your doing thats what the problem is. if an 8oz flat-bank isnt doing the job then none of the other styles will either.
     

  3. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I fished below Kaw Dam last week. They were only releasing somewhat like 5000cmf and I had 10 1/2 ounces of lead on. One was a 5 1/2 oz claw sinker, coupled with a 5 oz. bank. Went downstream faster than a cop going to a donut store. Eventually lost the weights. I didn't have any of my bigger claws with me...lol... but I am gonna carry some now. I don't think anything thrown into a current will go straight down like in a lake. You have to "lead" your spot... I think. lol
     
  4. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Maybe you *should* consider changing your location. If the current is so strong that you can't get your weight to stay in place, do you suppose there will be very many catfish in that much current?

    They're lazy just like you and me and won't fight the current any more than they have to -- they'll find some slack water or a break to hide behind and only venture out in the current when there's something good to eat. Think I'd try to find those current breaks and cast there instead.

    But if you're fishing out of the back of your boat, 8 oz should get your bait to the bottom in just about any current. But you'll never be able to cast out to the side and get it to stay in place if there's a lot of current.

    Your line weight could be part of the problem also -- 50 lb mono has a huge amount of drag in the current compared to 50 lb braid or 20 lb mono.
     
  5. Catter

    Catter New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Osceola, Arkansas
    Thanks for the input guys. I was'nt expecting to be able to fish it like it was a lake but it sure would be nice to be able to fish several spots at once. (area width wise)

    I know I need to anchor above my target area then fish out the back/sides and vary the amount of line out to fish the hole but there are always times that I wish I could fish "this spot" or "that spot" more off to the side or upstream a bit. (especially if there are 2 or more people in the boat)

    Good point on the amount of drag on your line, I once lost a $20 jug setup trying to anchor this 1 jug in a hole. Five pound weight and prolly a 1-1.5 gallon jug. Line got tight and jug slowly went under. The current just pushed it over like a willow tree in a tornado. lol

    Oh well, I rekon i'll keep fishing behind the boat.

    Yall take care,

    Joe
     
  6. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Since everybody else has already told you about not fishing cross current, I'll cover the sinkers more. Depending on the current, you can spread your baits some with the correct sinkers. Bank sinkers and no rolls won't do it. If the river bottom is sandy, you might be able to get away with a pyramid sinker. The sharp angles on a pyramid are meant to catch in the sand and hold position. I usually have one rod rigged with a pyramid sinker so I can toss it out toward midriver, like 45 degrees to the current (while anchored near the bank), to cover a bit more water, like you said. Claw sinkers or storm sinkers might grab even better. Whatever you do, expect to lose some rigs that way. Since the current is going to drag it some, there's a much better chance of a rig cast cross current of finding a good snag (and staying there forever).
     
  7. Catter

    Catter New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Osceola, Arkansas
    I wish I had a lead nickle for every rig i've lost over the years. :lol:

    Most of my catfishing used to be from the bank and some of the better places around here for bankin are pretty rocky to say the least. There's a coupla spots I always figured we could walk to tenn one day from all the sinkers lost there.

    Joe