Coast Guard Regs. Stern Light

Discussion in 'Boating' started by justwannano, Jul 21, 2007.

  1. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    So where can I find the coast guard regs concerning the height of stern lights.
    As I understand them the light must be the highest object on board.
    Does that include me?
    The last boat I had with lights had an adjustable height stern light that was nowhere as high as me or my passengers.
    So whats the real scoop?
     
  2. dademoss

    dademoss Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Ohio

  3. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    The rules for the type of boats we use arent going to plainly say the light has to be the highest point of the vessel or taller then the captain but they do say unobstructed.
    You put the light where its 360 degree radius of light will be unobstructed.
    The same applies to the navigation lights. In many instances the port side light is shining directly into a trolling motor.:crazy:
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    On our fishing boats, the all-around light serves as our stern light. The rule for it was... "All-round light" means a light showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360 degrees. To my way of thinking, in order for it to show an unbroken light over 360 degrees, it must be taller than the occupants in the boat also. Sounds like it needs to be six or seven feet tall, but I think that is not realistic... my rule, which I use on my boat, is the light has to be over my head when I am seated. When I stand up, I don't stand for long...too old. I found a 4' light for my boat...I am not worried about being cited for my lights, but for being ran over by those crazy people out there that think they should still run their boat on a plane in the dark...they are flat dangerous.
     
  5. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    There is no reason you shouldnt be able to run a boat on plane at night other then the body of water dictating it.
    If everyone ran their lights its not a problem.

    In complete darkness I've run 45-55 MPH on a lake. I've had no problems and wouldnt unless someone didnt abide the regs.
    On the Cape Fear I slow it down alot. The river itself dictates that. Its winding , not extremely wide and the depth varies and changes.
     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    And I have ran wide open on the Chesapeake Bay at night...till I hit a floating railroad tie. You never know whats in the water...it may not have been there when you passed 15 minutes ago. You have limited visibility at night and lights don't help a darn bit.
     
  7. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    what concerns me at night are the ID10T's who run up on plane, with NO lights. Those idiots are dangerous as you can't see them to know which direction to steer to pass them properly.
     
  8. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    The day I start worrying about what I might hit and hole my boat with is the day I leave my stuff in the driveway and only fish during the day time or better yet, not own a boat..:wink:

    I've never worked on a boat that was holed in the dark. Worked on a few and know of a few more that were holed during the day . All of them bass boats.
    They all hit something submerged like a "bouncing betty". A log that is semi bouyant. Floats and sinks.
    Day or night wouldnt matter. You cant see em either way whether you are at trolling motor speed or wide open.

    No matter what kind of boat it is , whenever you put it on the water you understand the risk of losing it and are willing to take the risk of losing it.
    Sounds familiar doesn't it?
    We do it everyday with our cars.