Circle hooks and size

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by bobsmitter03, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. bobsmitter03

    bobsmitter03 New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Wisconsin
    Do circle hooks work better than J hooks or do they work basically the same?

    What size circle hooks do you use for what size fish?
     
  2. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    Remember dont set the hook if you try circle hooks, let the fish bend the rod down hard then just pull back on the rod..I use 5/0 circles for fish up to 10-lbs..When I am targeting big fish I go with 8/0..Note, cicle hooks sizes are not the same with each brand.
     

  3. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    From my experience, they are almost the exactly the same, and in some cases circle hooks were a bit worse (something about deep hooking with one. Dont ask). But every time I have used a J hook, I either hooked them in the corner of the mouth or behind the bottom lip. J hooks are generally easier to get out too. I do like circle hooks though, by all means. I use them for most things not live-bait. I like the setting ability of the J hooks with live bait though.
     
  4. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    I use several different kinds of hooks and different sizes.It really all depends on what your after and what kind of bait your using,but most of the time i use kahle hooks since you can use them like a j hook or circle hook,it the best of both worlds.
     
  5. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    I use Gamakatsu Octopus Circles exclusively for catfish. The sizes range from 4/0-8/0, with 6/0 being the general size I use for most fish and 8/0 for large bait when I am after the bigger fish.

    By design a circle hook will roll to the tip when it is pulled out of the mouth of the fish, so you need to either be trolling/drifting or use enough weight to offere resistance. As it rolls out of the mouth of the fish the tip is exposed and grabs on the edge of the fishes mouth.

    One thing to keep in mind is that you need maximum hook tip exposure to get a good hook set. Don't bury the hook in the bait, instead hook through and edge or through eye sockets in fish heads or whole fish. This means you may have to use a bigger hook than you are used to using.

    The most important thing is to NOT try to set the hook as soon as the pole moves. You need to allow the fish to take the bait into it mouth, and the hook will set itself as the resistance start to pull it back out. If you try to set the hook too soon the fish may only have the back end of the bait and may not have made it to the hook.

    Each manufacturer has a slightly different shape and a 5/0 from one may not be the same as a 5/0 from another.

    I prefer the hooks with a bent eye for snelling. Snelling the hook seems to help with the rolling action. Snelling is not that hard, and you can find some east explanations online as to how to do it.

    Once you get the technique down, you will see why professional angler around the world are using circles hooks for the catch.
     
  6. bobsmitter03

    bobsmitter03 New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Wisconsin
    so after i feel the fish i should slowly reel in and the hook should set itself?
     
  7. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    You can start reeling when the rod folds over. You will know it.

    Just a bump or two is a fish too small for the bait you are throwing trying to drag it off or they are pecking on parts of the bait.

    When I used J-hooks I would jump up and head for the rods as soon as they starting knocking. Now I just stand there and wait for it to fold over good and then pick up and reel.
     
  8. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,081
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    I wouldnt say that one is better over the other, got to keep in mind that circle hooks are not for everyone with the many different fishermen and their preferences on what techniques to use. Circle hooks are a love/hate relationship. You even love them or hate them. Myself, I like the Gamakatsu 8/0 octopus circles.
     
  9. bill_gfish

    bill_gfish New Member

    Messages:
    192
    State:
    st. marys, oh
    with circle hooks you need a good rod holder or something to hold that rod in place so the weight of the fish can pull against it thus setting the hood itself. It is all about waiting for the fish to inhale the bait and move off thus pulling the hook back out as it is turning and catching corner of the mouth. And remember with circles, don't muscle the fish in if you can avoid it due to alot of the hooks set is in the soft flesh in the corner. Over muscle can rip it out, and keep tension as the hook sometimes tears the skin a bit and has room to fall out with slack.

    Like said, they aren't for everyone. For me I can't pay attention long enough to my rods to wait for the bite and run and set the hook at the right time. Circle are great for me. I use about the same in circles as Jack does. Give em a try, side by side with j hooks and compare.

    Not sure if it was said or not but not all circles are created equal. I have use eagle claw and find they are not sharp enough as well as other name brands and off brands I have tried. Owners aren't too bad but seem flimsy. Gamakatsu are by far the best and strongest I have tried, sharp right out of the package and stay sharp a long time.

    bill