Chemistry Question

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Katmandeux, Feb 6, 2007.

  1. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I've got some plastic drums that originally held Sodium Hypochlorite 12.5%. There is some residue in the barrels.

    I'd like to use them for a drip irrigation system I'm building. (No, I'm NOT growing herbs!):lol:

    How do I go about cleaning these things up? Will water do the job? If so, how do I dispose of the water?
     
  2. whitewhiskers

    whitewhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    764
    State:
    Evansville, Ind
    i have used plastic drums for garden pond filters before, they had detergent in them. i used a SOS pad to scrub them out and it worked fine. first i would check the MSDS sheet that should come with the drum
     

  3. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    Sorry about the last post but I couldn't edit it because I guess it timed out and would of had to contact the admin. (would have taken forever)... anyway here it is...

    A 12% solution is widely used in waterworks for the chlorination of water. High-test hypochlorite (HTH) is sold for chlorination of swimming pools and contains approximately 30% sodium hypochlorite. The crystalline salt is also sold for the same use; this salt usually contains less than 50% of sodium hypochlorite. However, the level of "active chlorine" may be much higher.
    Solutions burn skin and cause eye damage, particularly when used in concentrated forms. However, as recognized by the NFPA, only solutions containing more than 40% sodium hypochlorite by weight are considered hazardous oxidizers. Solutions less than 40% are classified as a moderate oxidizing hazard (NFPA 430, 2000).
    Rinsing with a 5mg/L solution, followed by washing with soap and water, quickly removes chlorine odor from the hands.
    Chlorination of drinking water can oxidize organic contaminants, producing trihalomethanes (also called haloforms), which are carcinogenic. The extent of the hazard thus created is a subject of disagreement.
    Mixing bleach with some household cleaners can be hazardous. For example, mixing an acid cleaner with sodium hypochlorite bleach generates chlorine gas. Mixing with ammonia solutions produces chloramines. Both chlorine gas and chloramine gas are toxic. Bleach can react violently with hydrogen peroxide and produce oxygen gas:
    H2O2 + NaClO → NaCl + H2O + O2
    It is estimated that there are about 3300 accidents needing hospital treatment caused by sodium hypochlorite solutions each year in British homes
    (RoSPA, 2002).

    They said on Wikipedia that soap and water OR ethanol. DO YOUR RESEARCH!!! and BE CAREFUL.
    (Dispose of chemicals properly too.)
     
  4. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Yeah, we're always slow to help out. Well, I removed the original post for you. Sorry it took so long though!:smile2:
     
  5. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Bryan! You and the rest of the "MODS" best get off your dead butts and start workin on the response time to problems! LOL!
     
  6. keithcatfish

    keithcatfish New Member

    Messages:
    148
    State:
    Maryville, TN
    Sodium hypochlorite is the active ingredient of common household bleach. Household bleach is usually 5.25 % sodium hypochlorite. So, the drums you have contained about 2.5 X the concentration of standard household bleach. After a good cleaning, they should be safe to use. I would wash them thouroughly with detergent and rise them a couple of times. Pour the rinsate down the sink, and you will have no problems whatsoever. BTW, I'm a chemistry teacher, have worked extensively with hazardous chemicals in industry and have OSHA 40 hour and OSHA supervisor certification.
     
  7. keithcatfish

    keithcatfish New Member

    Messages:
    148
    State:
    Maryville, TN
    In addition, wear protective eyewear to protect against splashes and use good old laundry detergent to avoid any potential nasty chemical reactions (DO NOT clean with acids or peroxide). Check out an MSDS sheet for any extra info.