Charging batteries.

Discussion in 'Boat Modification Journal' started by nexustom, Mar 1, 2009.

  1. nexustom

    nexustom New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Illinois
    During the summer I keep my boat in my apartment parking lot. There are no outside electrical outlets. I would need several hundred feet of extension cord. It is a chore carrying the batteries upstairs to my apartment. Last time I set off the smoke detector in my apartment charging the batteries when I was not home. The landlord was not happy. I have been researching but can not find an answer. Is there a way I can charge my boat batteries while driving my truck?
     
  2. lendog

    lendog New Member

    Messages:
    2,141
    State:
    berks, PA
    i would think the only way is if you put your boat battery in the truck and drive around, unless you want to hook cables up and let the truck run to charge them, they do sell solar chargers that you can hook up to them which can also give you a trickle charge
     

  3. thunderchicken

    thunderchicken New Member

    Messages:
    769
    State:
    Yuma Az
    I would seriously look into a solar charger. They have many different types depending on your needs. They work great also for extended trips where you may not have access to electricity to a regular charger.

    :cool2:
     
  4. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    Solar charger is going to be your best bet. If you only use the boat occasionally, it would be great
     
  5. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Yes, there is a way to charge the boat battery while you drive. It will require a trailer connector with 7 pins (RV Style), it's how they charge & supply the "house" battery on camping type trailers.

    From that connector you'll be supplied with the truck's battery voltage, you'll then have to make a detachable pigtail going to your boat battery. If your boat usage is minimal then a solar charger will be your best bet.

    One last thing to remember about charging from your truck, is that if you are using deep cycle batteries, they are NOT designed to take the rapid fast charge from your vehicle's alternator. They are designed to be charged SLOWLY, just as they were designed to be discharged.

    HTH, Elliot
     
  6. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    Attach one of these puppies to your boat, and then try not to drive to fast to the lake: http://www.windenergy.com/products/whisper_100.htm

    But seriously, a 12 volt generator may be your best bet, there are some decent lightweight ones in the $300-$400 range.
     
  7. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    I agree with the 7 pin adapter, but aren't the batteries in a camping trailer deep cycle also?
     
  8. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,507
    State:
    Napoleon, Mo.
    The ones in my camper are deep cycle. I have the ability to charge them from the truck using the 7 pin but don't use it. Just have the 4 pin on mine.
     
  9. nexustom

    nexustom New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Illinois
    I'll check with a RV Camping store. My start motor is not a deep cycle so it should be OK. Only my trolliing motor is a deep cycle. I have a gizmo that is supposed to charge the second battery from the outboard alternator when the start motor is fully charged. I haven't installed it yet. My understanding is that the outboard alternator is not strong enough to charge the deep cycle on short runs. I can live without the trolling motor. I do have a solar charger. It is a larger one but only puts out milli-amps. It isn't even a good battery maintainer when the battery is fully charged.
     
  10. Martin Rhodes

    Martin Rhodes New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Murfreesboro, Tn
    Batteries 101

    1. Lead type batteries require a full charge within 24 hours of use.

    2. Never store batteries in areas that are used by humans or pets due to caustic fumes.

    3. Batteries should always be stored in a cool dry place.

    4. Recycle all old batteries (all the components are recyclable)

    5. Avoid full cycle because of wear. Use 80% depth-of-discharge. Recharge more often or use larger battery. Low energy density limits lead-acid to wheeled applications

    6. Apply topping charge every 6 months. Occasional discharge/ charge may improve performance.

    7. Store always at a full state-of-charge. Do not store below 2.10V/cell; apply topping charge very 6 months.

    8. Do charge the battery immediately after use. Lead-acid must always be kept in a charged condition. The battery lasts longer with partial rather than full discharges. Over-cycling is not advised.