Changing clutch in a 91 ford pickup

Discussion in 'Other Repairs' started by FS Driver, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    well what should have been a couple hour job turned this beutiful sunday
    into an almost all day fight to the finish dealing with a hydraulic clutch problem.

    first off dont cut the line in frustration as my neighbor did trying to remove the hydraulic line out of the side of the slave cylinder .
    and if you do you can rejoin this with a heavyduty compression coupling
    i had to use a drill bit a slight larger than the i.d.of the hard plastic hydra.
    line to ream it enough to allow the inner support barb to slide in

    everything else other than parts house giveing me the wrong clutch the first time went ok until bleeding the system !!!!!

    it isnt the same as bleeding brakes.
    there is air you wont get out by pumping , holding down and releaseing the fluid. it seems like it would work but it doesn't.

    you should make sure the pedal is UP ,and then loosen the bleeder nut on slave cylinder and with a clean pump oil can and hose force clean brake fluid up from below forceing the air to escape up out of the master cylinder resevour. tighten nut back up and top off or remove excess fluid with suction to level the mstr cyl to proper capacity.

    i hope this helps anyone that ever gets into the same predictament as i did today .

    by the way neighbors quick decision to cut hose would have been a 30.00
    new or trip to the junkyard had we not did the repair couple.

    more often than not rash decisions cause more trouble than if you sit back and use your head a little more:confused2:

    all we had to do was push in on the plastic keeper ring and pull out on hose to disconnect at slave cylinder.

    up on master cylinder a small roll pin is what holds the line in place to cylinder front houseing
     
  2. CNTRYBOY

    CNTRYBOY New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Benton, Ar
    DRC - that sounds so familiar! Only i did not cut my line - i ended up breaking the thing tugging on it. And it cost me a good 30.00 for a new one from the dealership!!!!
     

  3. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    The Old saying,"Haste makes waste" Sure is true & yes those hydraulic systems can be a real P.I.T.A..

    I have a special tool that will either suck the fluid out the bottom or force it from the bottom out the top, which is the method I prefer. First off air is lighter than the fluid so it only makes sense, secondly you are not breaking up the big air bubbles into hundreds of little ones by pedal agitation (pumping).

    There has been many beers & blood pressure meds consumed over these systems :crazy:
     
  4. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    i still have air in the line .
    if i hold my foot on the clutch in traffic too long it will loose prime and i will
    be at the mercy of my brakes .
    it will stay in gear and i have to shut off truck and pull pedal up with foot and pump it or wait a bit till it gets pressure back before i can go again.
    i have had to find a place to pull in and re-bleed the system from slave up to master method 3 times now. it seems this last time has lasted longer but its also getting cooler outside .
    ive been told that compression coupleing i put on line can suck in air and not leak fluid.
    i also have been told that the new brakefluid wixed with the old fluid and weakened the seals.
    yes its been a big P. I .T. A .
     
  5. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Generally, if you depress the pedal & the clutch releases w/o having to pump it, then you have all the air out. If the clutch starts to release after the pedal is depressed, then you usually have a master cylinder that is bleeding(fading). This is not uncommon, #1 because of age but more importantly due to the fact that as you are bleeding it, you "Bottom out" the master cylinder plunger when you push it all the way to the floor, rupturing the seals.

    There is a trick that i'll share with you. Take the cap off of the master cylinder, remove the rubber boot that sits inside of it, reinstall the cap, now take some compressed air(low pressure) with a blower nozzle & inject it thru the hole in the top of the cap, while @ the same time, opening the bleeder screw on the slave cylinder. Remember, it doesn't hold alot of fluid, so check it frequently, if there is any air in there, it will expel it.

    HTH & good luck, Elliot
     
  6. Shortarms

    Shortarms New Member

    Messages:
    48
    State:
    Illinois
    I had an '89 that gave us fits when trying to get the air out as well. We put a mity-vac on the bleeder screw and sucked the fluid out from below while someone was on top keeping the resorvoir full. I can't remember if the pedal had to pressed or at rest. I'm guessing pressed so the fluid can pass between the resorvoir and hydraulic circuit. I have seen hydraulic systems suck air in but not leak fluid out. Good luck.