Catfish River Boat Setup

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by FREESPOOL, Aug 29, 2007.

  1. FREESPOOL

    FREESPOOL New Member

    Messages:
    1,234
    State:
    Edwardsville, Illinois
    I'm still in the early stages of setting up my pontoon for river boating and river catfishing. What are some things that you wouldn't be without when you're out catfishing. I've got a new chene anchor and anchor line on the way. I lost my other anchor wrestling Darryl1's boat in the current. Needed a new one anyways. :smile2: I'm also getting some heavier anchor line.

    When I was below the dam last Saturday.... They must have opened the gates to clear some debris. I looked up the river towards the dam and the whole river was filled with debris. So we sprang into action getting our lines out of the water. By the time we got our lines out, the debris had reached us already. And we still had to pull up our anchor. A tree about 6" in diameter by about 15 or 20 feet struck our anchor line. This knocked the anchor loose and sent us down with the current. Then of course, this same tree wedged itself in between my toons. So I couldn't start the outboard to steer clear of the debris until we finally got the tree out from underneath the boat.

    I'm thinking I need an anchor bouy for those few times when you just need to get out of the way.

    What other items am I going to miss not having with me out there?

    Dan
     
  2. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    a large push poll , gorila glue , duct tape , of course all the normal gear life jackets and such , extra clothes , toilet paper , a bucket , extra rope , water proof matches , rain gear , a knife every 3 feet , a gps , leather gloves

    all this is on my 16' river jon plus all my rods and tackle
     

  3. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Let me see.......

    Of course I can't think of a thing right now.


    • A quality, large sized dip net but not so big its always in the way.
    • A good cast net, as large as you can comfortably throw, practice, practice, practice.
    • VHF Marine Radio with weather stations (they all have that probably).
    • Sturdy Rod Holders, Driftmasters, maybe the 1/2" ones since I broke a 3/8" last week.
    • Sonar with GPS Navigation, spend the extra money to get the unit with the mapping software.
    • Comfortable life jackets so you will wear them.
    • Anchor buoy system
    • Drift bucket, homemade, see Doc Lange's thread
    • Plenty of cleats
    • Bigger Fenders than what I bought! They don't work too well if they are too small.
    • A quality Bait Tank system is on my wish list.
    • A BIG livewell, portable if you don't have one built-in already.
    • First aid kit
    • Tools
    • Spare Fuses and bulbs for everything on your boat and trailer.
    • A decent scale that goes up tp at least a 100lbs
    • A list of phone numbers, Emergency and do you know who you'll call if you catch the next Missouri record?
    • There is more, you caught me off guard.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Malichi1970

    Malichi1970 New Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    State:
    Fenton, Missouri
    Hey Dan, don't know how you deal with your anchor rope. But, I went fishing with a fellow BOC member on his boat and he had a great way of dealing with it. He used a electric cord holder, one of the round ones with the handle in the middle. Kept all his rope wound up and out of the way, he just rolled off what he needed, tied off tot a cleat and set the rest off to the side. He put and hook on the end of his rope that he just clipped on the anchor when he got it out and then up clipped it when he put it away.

    Uh OH....maybe I shouldn't of revealed that secret. :roll_eyes:
     
  5. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    That reel trick might work really well, I don't know.

    What I learned in expert climber training is to just lay your rope into a bag wherever it may fall, just feed it in there. It will come out tangle free everytime. When people try to coil it is when they have trouble. I bought an anchor bag at bass pro and thats what I use, it works great.

    That reel might work good also but I see some potential problems when you need or want line to pay out quickly such as dropping anchor.

    Oh, and I don't even mess with the bag when I am working my rope throughout the day (some rope remains in the bag). I do use the same technique though of piling it on top of itself as I pull it in onto the forward deck.

    Then rope into the bag, then the bag into the forward locker for storage.
     
  6. Malichi1970

    Malichi1970 New Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    State:
    Fenton, Missouri
    It actually worked very well for letting out line quickly. the handle on the inside stayed stationary while the wheel that the rope is wrapped around moves around the handle letting the rope off as fast as it wants to go.
     
  7. slider

    slider New Member

    Messages:
    581
    State:
    louisiana, mo
    my boat has a anchor storage just put the rope in and it comes out the same way never had any tangles works for me
     
  8. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    a 5 gallon bucket works pretty darn well and is super cheap.
     
  9. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I keep my anchor rope and anchor in an old milk crate. Better than a 5-gal bucket since it doesn't hold water. The crate sits on my front deck and I just plop the line in it as I take up the anchor, very seldom have any problems with tangled line.


    Be careful - that's a good way to lose an anchor, rope and buoy - depending on the size of the buoy and the amount of current, the whole thing is likely to disappear under the water never to be seen again... It's happened to at least a few folks I know...

    One thing I'd recommend that nobody has mentioned is the "Gripper" style cleats - those are the kind where you zig-zag your anchor rope in the teeth of the cleat, making it very easy to un-do the rope in a hurry. Here's an example of what I'm talking about:
    http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wc...cleat/Primary Search/mode matchallpartial/0/0

    And finally, I've purchased no less than 3 "really big" dip nets, only to find that my idea of "really big" is nowhere near big enough for when you get a true hawg on the line. My latest net, however, is "really really big" and when I catch something that won't fit in it, that'll be a great problem to have. My point is, buy a dip net that looks ridiculously huge - because eventually it won't look quite so huge...
     
  10. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl

    Marty I agree with you there. I have what seems like a really huge net but when it came time to boat both of my 50+ pounders this year I just lipped them with my hands. To have a bigger net on board seems a little comical to me plus a big pain in the a$$. I'll probably regret not having one someday. It helps to have someone on board with you when net time comes, especially in the current, hard to handle the fish, and the net all at once with a big cat. At least for me.


    Oh yeah, the milk crate is a great idea!
     
  11. FREESPOOL

    FREESPOOL New Member

    Messages:
    1,234
    State:
    Edwardsville, Illinois
    This is good stuff here. Keep it coming. :big_smile:

    Here's a few things you guys listed that i'll be getting.

    Rain gear, more rod holders, comfortable life jackets, bigger scale (mines the $5 one from walmart that only goes up to 50 lbs, milk crate, gripper cleats. I'm sure theres plenty more.

    Dan
     
  12. FREESPOOL

    FREESPOOL New Member

    Messages:
    1,234
    State:
    Edwardsville, Illinois
    Hey Darryl, what size anchor bouy did I see on your boat? Have you tried it out? We've been looking at a 15" bouy. Think it'll be big enough?
     
  13. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    get one of these the current won't pull them under. http://www.ironwoodpacific.com/products/anchoring_mooring/anchorlift.htm

    I currently use a 5 gal bucket and keep a lid on board to float My anchor rope with in the event I need to. just dump out the rope, slap on the lid clip on the rope and throw over board and go chase her down. THe bucket will stay above the water in all but the stongest current.
     
  14. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I like that idea!

    I've got a 3 gal bucket on the boat now that my new cast net came in, along with the lid. If I ever need to drop the anchor line in an emergency (or to follow a big fish, as if that would ever happen to me...), I'll use your idea....
     
  15. grinnel

    grinnel New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    Pool 25, Mississippi MO
    I have 5" loops tied into my anchor line about every 3'. The loops make it easy to pull up your anchor because the knots and the loop themselves give you something to hold on to. Once I've fed out enough anchor line I have a heavy duty carabeener (sp) that I clip through the loop which is clipped on to a smaller diameter rope that is fed through the eye of my boat. If I need to turn loose of the anchor line in a hurry, I have a sharp knife that I can cut the smaller diameter rope with.

    I usually use a another carabeener to attach a 5 gallon bucket on the last loop of the line incase I need to unhitch.

    Also, if you have alot of anchor rope out in deep water and need a break while pulling it up (I use a 30 lb navy anchor) the loops make it quick and easy to drape it over a cleat and give yourself a break.


    Grinnel
     
  16. Malichi1970

    Malichi1970 New Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    State:
    Fenton, Missouri
    Dang a 30lbs anchor...I'd be sore just from fighting that thing all day:smile2: