Catfish Jugs? What do you use to make your catfish jugs?

Discussion in 'LOCAL NORTH CAROLINA TALK' started by natethe great, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. natethe great

    natethe great New Member

    Messages:
    111
    State:
    North carolina
    just was wondering on what every one used for their jugs i know it depends on the size of the cats that r wanting to be cought but other then that im lost so whats good and whats bad to use for the ones about 8-20lbs ummmmmmm i have a bunch of gatorade propel bottles that ive been trying out but when i pait them neon orange they r still kindof dark i say this because they r already a dark blue bottle so if u have any other comments on this please let me know guys thanks this site helps me so much till next time good fishing
     
  2. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    I like white bleach bottles the best. White is easy to see from a distance. I've got some 2 litter soda bottles painted white also but the paint chips off quick. I found one on the river once that the old boy who had it must have all kinds of time on his hands. It was made up of 2 metal 1/2 gal juice cans that he put end to end, then braised it all away around. He also braised a loop on one end for the cord. Bottom half was painted black, top half white.
     

  3. todobiennc

    todobiennc New Member

    Messages:
    53
    State:
    nc
    How long of cord do you use?
     
  4. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    Varies. Usually around 5 to 6 ft. We have the best luck in the summer drifting them over shallow sand flats.
     
  5. Carp King

    Carp King New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    North carolina
    If you have white or pearl paint then try that. iIt might do you better then the neon orange, I dont know.
     
  6. Dave53

    Dave53 New Member

    Messages:
    411
    State:
    Lonedell M
    When ever I want to fill the freezer with eating catfish my son and I take about 20 on the Missouri with a couple packs of the cheepest hotdogs you can find. I have used everything from soda bottles to pvc. The best so far has been the 4" round noodles that Walmart sells for kids to swim with. One noodle makes 3 or 4 jugs if I remember right. I cut the noodle in at least 20" pieces. At the top of the jug holding it vertically I use a small round file that I make a hole that goes through the jug horizontally about an inch from the top that I push my braided twine through and tie it off at the top. I then take the rest of the line (3 to 5 feet) and drop it through the center of the jug so it comes out the other end. I found this way when a fish hits the jug it stands up quick. What kind of hook you use is up to you. I have used circles, straight, and kayle hooks. I like to use treble hooks. The largest cat I have caught with these noodle jugs has been 22 pounds so far. I did have two that went down and did not come up. Some people think it was a tree floating by or something else. Personally I think it was a big cat fish! The 22 pound cat held the noodle under water a couple seconds and bounced it all over the water. Also when you are chasing down the noodle by having the line go through the center of the jug when you grab the end of it you have a good hold on the line and fish. good luck
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    How you make your jugs and what you use to make them will depend a lot on the type of water you fish. On smaller lakes, backwaters, large coves, etc., you can easily use smaller jugs with a low profile; you can even use them on large lakes and rivers if you only put out a very few and stay right with them. But remember that once those buggers get 1/2 mile away, they're awfully hard to see, even with 10x binoculars. Of course, the larger the jugs, the more space they take up in the boat; so, it's a trade-off. I do most of my jugging on the Arkansas River, and have found that, FOR ME, jugs made out of 2-liter soda jugs work best. I tried the foam noodles, and found that they disappeared in the distance too easily to suit me. But lots of folks love them and do very well with them. You really need to do some experimenting to see what works best for you. As for color, again I tried several before I settled on bright yellow. To me, white disappears in the glare; black can be seen a long long way, but can be mistaken for a stump--or a stump can be mistaken for a jug; flourescent green worked great, but it's expensive, and requires that the jug be painted white first. I can buy a can of yellow spray paint for a buck at Wal Mart, and it will paint 20 jugs if I'm careful. You'll catch a lot of fish shallow, but if you limit yourself to short lines, you'll definitely miss a lot of fish. I like my lines to be as long as possible without hanging up too much; if you don't hang up occasionally, lengthen your line a little. I put my top hook 3' below the surface, and have hooks every 3' to the bottom of the line...well, almost the bottom. I put my weight about a foot below my bottom hook; it's a 16p or 20p nail. It's cheap, and doesn't hang up as much as a regular sinker. This is for freefloating jugs, of course. I don't anchor my jugs very often because I don't catch as many fish on them.
     
  8. Mattbowen1990

    Mattbowen1990 Member

    Messages:
    110
    State:
    North Carolina
    have problems with the paint chipping off of your 2 liter plastic bottles??? just paint the inside with a color like blaze orange... I have 2 types of jugs, one is a 2 liter coke bottle painted blaze orange, and the others are Bright yellow swimming noodles (cut into about 2 ft each) and a peace of PVC pipe stuck on the inside... I use different depths, that way you can find where the cats are depth wise. Even 2 liter coak bottles are very noticable when a small cat gets on them because they will start spinning and going crazy.
     
  9. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    2 litter coke bottles work real well.Thier clear plastic and just get some of those Glow Sticks from Wild Wolf Products activate one, put in it the bottle ,you shouldn't have any trouble seeing the bottle. Look s like a bunch of fireflys out there on the water.They work great on rods also.
     
  10. natethe great

    natethe great New Member

    Messages:
    111
    State:
    North carolina
    wow what a return to the post thank yall soooo much u all dont know how much this is going to help well im going to try 2 litter bottles cause i think the pvc in the pool noodle wouldnt be as sensative o all the fish and right know i have them set at about 22 foot does anybiody in here use milk jugs i dont know if thell be sensative either and i dont know if the ttop would pop off ummmm i like the idea of spraying the in side of the bottle so that the paint doesnt chipp off im going to try that two. aslo i dont know if my local lake has that many shallow areas where they go and spawn or just go to to be in cooler water but i trhink next time i go out im going to do some searching. well guys thanks for the help and till next time good fishing
    :wink:
     
  11. RamRod

    RamRod New Member

    Messages:
    2,047
    State:
    Ohio
  12. ronlyn239

    ronlyn239 New Member

    Messages:
    270
    State:
    Bartlesvil
    If you are going to make them from 2 liter bottles, here's a tip for ya.

    When I first made mine, I had trouble with them collapsing in cool water. So, remembering my high school physics, cold air takes up less volume than warm air. So I put the 2 liter bottles in the freezer, with the caps off, of course, and let them chill for an hour or so. I capped each one tightly as I removed them one at a time from the freezer. That was 20 years ago, my son has them now and they are still as tight as a drum head.
     
  13. ronlyn239

    ronlyn239 New Member

    Messages:
    270
    State:
    Bartlesvil
    I have since moved on from the 2 liter bottles, and now use noodles with the noodle kit from Wild Wolf Products. Makes a great jug.
     
  14. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Find a block of old pier foam floating in the lake. Using a handsaw, cut it down into slabs about 4" wide, then cut into 6" wide strips. Take strip, cut off blocks about 2" thick. Get some metal coat hangers and stretch them out. You need to cut the metal 7" long for 6" blocks. You'll also need to cut an equal amount of 6" pieces (for however many you're making). Take 6" piece, bend into staple shape (2"x2"x2"). Take one end of 7" piece and wrap the end around the center of the staple. Then take the straight end of 7" piece and insert into center of the smallest side of block, all the way through the bottom. Make sure the two staple ends push into the top of the block also. Thread metal sticking out at bottom of block through one eye of a big barrel swivel (approx. 1/2" to 3/4") and bend to secure. On other end of swivel, attach line, whatever length for depth you are fishing. Attach whatever size hook you want to end of line. For shallow depths, use a single hook, no weight. This jug method allows jug to lay down flat on water so wind does not affect it as badly. Also, when the fish hits it it stands upright, so you know you got him! If you add more hooks and line you add weight, which can cause this flagging response also, so use weight sparingly. You may also add reflective tape or calamite sticks for visibility at night, and put your name and address on them. Tested, tried and true; even large fish cannot keep this jug under for more than five minutes. Be sure to take at least a one million candlepower spotlight if you'll be jugging at night - you'll need it to spot them in the dark. Good luck, and please CPR the big boys and girls, :0a31:
     
  15. Carp King

    Carp King New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    North carolina
  16. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    I don't make them. Rod and reel only. :sad2:
     
  17. Bream baiter

    Bream baiter New Member

    Messages:
    147
    State:
    South Carolina
    Bill and Jerry, there's nothing wrong with jugging if it's done RESPONSIBLY. Problem is here in NC, most of the juggers are put out many more jugs than they can tend to, they leave them unattended, and they don't release the big fish. If they want fish to eat, then they should keep the smaller fish, maybe 5 lbs. or less, and preferably not flatheads or blues. Take a picture of the big fish and release them. Don't haul them around for a day or two then throw them in the woods. It takes way too long to replace a big fish. Small fish can be replaced in a year or two. Juggers are the biggest cause of the decline in numbers and size of fish in the lakes where I fish. As for this website, it's a great website but juggers watch it for good fishing reports. A day or two after a good report has been posted for a certain lake, that lake will get pounded by juggers and jugs will be scattered for miles littering the lake long after the jug owners are gone. That's why people on this website often get a little irritated about jug fiishing.
    If juggers would use 25 jugs or less, keep them in sight, and release the big fish, then jugging wouldn't be such a hot topic.
     
  18. i got'em

    i got'em New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    tx
  19. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Think i'll modify mine after seein yours Johnny. I like it:big_smile: