Catfish Gumbo

Discussion in 'The BOC Diner' started by DLB-in-GR, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    I didn't see a recipe listed for this delicious way to prepare catfish, so I thought I would share mine. I made a double recipe of this today from Saturday's catch and got many compliments.

    Catfish Gumbo
    (originally adapted from the book "The Essential Catfish Cookbook")
    serves 4-6

    2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
    1 cup onion, chopped
    1 cup celery, chopped
    1 cup green pepper, chopped
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    4 cups fish stock (see below), vegetable stock, or chicken stock
    14.5 oz can diced tomatoes with juice (I used home grown canned tomatoes)
    1 teaspoon dried thyme (garden grown if you have it)
    1 teaspoon dried oregano (garden grown if you have it)
    1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (adjust lower unless you like it hot!)
    1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce (very optional, only for those who like it really hot!)
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 bay leaf
    10 oz package frozen, sliced okra
    1 lbs catfish fillets, cut into 1-2" cubes
    3/4 lbs shrimp, peeled and deveined (I used cooked cocktail shrimp)
    4 cups cooked rice

    1. Heat oil in frying pan over medium heat. Saute celery and green pepper until almost translucent, then add onion and garlic and saute until the onion is getting translucent and soft.

    2. In a larger stock pot, add sauted vegetables, stir in stock, tomatoes, spices, and herbs. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes.

    3. Add okra and cook for the time recommended on the package.

    4. Add catfish cubes and cook for 5-8 minutes.

    5. Add shrimp and cook for 2-3 minutes longer.

    6. Remove bay leaf. Serve over cooked rice.


    Fish Stock recipe (if you are really ambitious):

    Fish carcasses from filleted panfish (minus the head and tail)
    1-2 ribs celery, coarsely chopped
    1 carrot, coarsely chopped
    1 onion, coarsely chopped
    2-4 sprigs of fresh parsley
    1 bay leaf
    2-3 sprigs of fresh thyme
    juice of 1 lemon
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon peppercorns

    Use a pound of fish bones (washed carcasses left over after filleting panfish) for each quart of water.
    Put the fish in the water and bring to a boil, then add remaining ingredients.
    Simmer for 20-30 minutes uncovered, or until liquid is about half boiled away.
    Strain stock and discard solids.
    Store liquid in the freezer for future use, I stored mine in 2 cup quantities.
     
  2. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    Idunno...there's tons of good flavor in those fish heads. :big_smile: Actually, I think Sheila would shoot me if I made some fish stock, lmao. BUT your recipe does sound mmm'mmm good!
     

  3. Shimano_cat

    Shimano_cat New Member

    Messages:
    261
    State:
    North Caro
    If you all keep posting these recipes, I'm gonna have to keep more fish. I've got to give this one a try also---sounds awesome!
     
  4. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I have never eaten gumbo,Doug. Allways wanted to,just never had the chance. Might give this a try,I know it'll be added to my recipes at any rate.
     
  5. daystarchis

    daystarchis New Member

    Messages:
    11,521
    State:
    Clovis Cali
    Recipe sound mighty good brother. Thanks for the recipe:wink:
     
  6. catdaddy64

    catdaddy64 New Member

    Messages:
    160
    State:
    Louisiana
    Gumbo ain't gumbo without file it's just a fancy soup.
     
  7. lforet2002

    lforet2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,534
    State:
    Tennessee
    Amen!!
     
  8. Eddie Mullins

    Eddie Mullins New Member

    Messages:
    299
    State:
    AR
    sounds good, but wheres the rioux?

    I enjoy making gumbo, exept for babysitting that rioux :smile2: My normal is chicken and sausage because it always available and cheap, shrimp gets added when available as well as other edibles. I have never put fish in because I figured it was too delicate, but I may just give it a try.
     
  9. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    You taught me something, I had never heard of file before right now. I looked it up on Wiki. I wouldn't know where to buy that in Michigan. Might be in the ethnic section of the grocery store, I've never heard of it so never looked.

    In Michigan, authentic Creole and Cajun cooking is pretty much non-existent. I'll look for file though, my recipe may need an improvement!
     
  10. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    Some people don't appreciate all art forms. People in my house see the mess, I see the masterpiece. For me, cooking is just that, a work of art. I could use chicken stock in the recipe and it would be good, but nothing beats that home made fish stock. I caught a limit of bluegill yesterday and pan-dressed them out instead of filleting (minus head and tail, fins, etc), used the cleaned dressed fish instead of just the skeletons, and made 4 and 1/2 quarts of fish stock out of them today. I freeze it in 2 cup amounts and use in fish soups and stews. I tasted some and it was awesome, I can't wait to use it in some recipes.
     
  11. buckethead

    buckethead New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    arkansas
    ""Caution""" if you use ""file"" dont add it until after it stops boiling, if you boil the file, the ::Gumbo:: will be like a Slime Ball, it is made from the Root of a Sasafrase Tree, all it really does is make the Gumbo Thick!!

    If you cant find it up where you live ,let me know and I will send you a bottle of it, dont take much , maybe a tea spoon is all you need, I hardley ever use it, I use Okra instead, of file, but I fry the Okra first, if you dont the Gumbo will be like slime, you know how boiled Okra is ((LMAO)) if you will fry it first you dont have the problem,
    something else you will need is some ""Tony's seasoning"" if you cant find it I will get you some, Gumbo means Soup, so you can make it out of any thing, while you are at the store, look for some of this sauage

    """Andouille"" is the name of it, put some of that in your Gumbo!!

    cliff
     
  12. recordbreakin1

    recordbreakin1 New Member

    Messages:
    746
    State:
    texas
    Thats sounds real good thanks for the recipe.
     
  13. lforet2002

    lforet2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,534
    State:
    Tennessee
    Actually there are 2 derivatives of the word "gumbo"..One is from the Angolan word for okra which is kingombo..But some people also think it comes from the Choctaw word kombo which means sassafras..True both are used to thicken...I use file after its all cooked and I sprinkle it on like I would salt and pepper..Really since theres okra in this recipe you don't need a roux or file..Another good meat to add to gumbo is tasso which is smoke pork made from the shoulder butt(boston butt)..
     
  14. buckethead

    buckethead New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    arkansas
    Hey Les !!


    You must be from the ""bayou"" No ?????:smile2:


    right on Bro !!

    cliff
     
  15. lforet2002

    lforet2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,534
    State:
    Tennessee
    Yes sir born and raised in the bayous of south Louisiana..
     
  16. Eddie Mullins

    Eddie Mullins New Member

    Messages:
    299
    State:
    AR
    What you mean gumbo doesn't need a rioux? I'm not from LA, but was raised in MS and had the good fortune of having a few coon a.... I mean cajuns as friends and I didn't know you could make one without it. I know it may not necesarily be needed for thickening but I think its part of the overall flavor and experience of the meal. Slow cooking that flour til its brown and taosted, I can just smell it now. Darn it, I'm gonna have to make gumbo soon now :smile2: . I just wish you could buy decent sausage around here. I'll have a smoker built by fall and want have to worry about any more then. :wink:
     
  17. lforet2002

    lforet2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,534
    State:
    Tennessee
    Sure you can make gumbo without roux..Did you know that cajun roux is usually dark to where its almost burnt..The darker the roux the stronger the flavor which is kinda nutty..
     
  18. catdaddy64

    catdaddy64 New Member

    Messages:
    160
    State:
    Louisiana
    You can also jump out of a plane without a parachute but why would you want to do that unless you are trying to commit suicide? I have never read a more sacrilegious statement in all my born days. One more statement like that ("you can make gumbo without using a roux") and I am personally going to drive to Tennessee and revoke your "cajun" card? How can you sleep at night with such nonsense rattling around inside your skull...

    Vous devez revenir à la maison et contacter votre cajun intérieur parce que quelque chose est allée mal, cher.
     
  19. catdaddy64

    catdaddy64 New Member

    Messages:
    160
    State:
    Louisiana
    Gumbo with roux is more traditional (regional = south Louisiana)Cajun style and Gumbo without is more (international =everywhere else)Creole Style.

    I was telling my mom, who makes a great gumbo, about Les saying you can make a gumbo without roux and she told me that she never used a roux until she moved to south Louisiana. I was shocked to imagine my own mother, my flesh and blood not using a roux.:sad2:

    She was raised about 130 miles north of where we now live and said when she was coming up roux (flour and oil) was the bases for gravies but that they used a flour and water or flour and corn starch mixture to thicken their gumbos and kitchen bouquet or beef bouillon for color.

    So Les you were right, it is possible to make gumbo without using a roux...

    God that was hard to say...:embarrassed:
     
  20. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    I was at the grocery store today and by golly I found file. I bought some, going to sprinkle just a tad on the gumbo in the bowl at the end to see how it works as a thickener. I looked for the Tony's Seasoning and they had a spot for it on the shelf but they were sold out, I'll have to pick that one up next time. Thanks for the advice.