Catfish chum, what do you think makes it work?

Discussion in 'Homemade baits' started by bhunt, Oct 6, 2007.

  1. bhunt

    bhunt New Member

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    I have heared that its not the smell to us that makes chum work. They say its the protien and other chemicals in chum that makes cats come to it. They say what we smell is not the same as it is under water. What do you catman think about how chum works. Im thinking if it isnt the bad smell that makes it work than there are probaly some good chum recipes that dont smell bad to us. If its protien related maybe a meat base chum would work good. Just wondering what everyone thinks.
     
  2. PHLIPS4BIGKATS

    PHLIPS4BIGKATS New Member

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    2,679
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    Alma Kansas
    IF THERE IS AN OIL OF SOME SORT THAT WILL MAKE A SLICK. BLOOD WORKS, DEAD SHAD , SOY BEAN OIL OR ANIS .:0a26:
     

  3. yeppa

    yeppa New Member

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    636
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    NO PAIN--NO GAIN!! If you figure out one that doesn't make my eyes water, you would be an instant hero.
     
  4. DemolitionMan

    DemolitionMan New Member

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    442
    State:
    Tupelo, Mississippi
    bhunt,

    Go around your favorite fishing hole and talk to the oldtimers around the baitshop....It's always better to use a chum that the fish are accustom to in your area....Whether it's shad, skipjack, cutbait or what....Natural bait will always beat out the other concoctions, depending on the area....Look in the contents section at the top of the page and go down to "cutbaits, baits, and chums".....Lots of ideas....This is a kinda cutbait/chum one here

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38805

    Hope this helps.....Dwight
     
  5. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

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    7,782
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    I know we went to one tournament this year that the favorite chum being used by the locals was range cubes and they don't stink. I don't use chum usually but going from that i would agree that chum doesn't have to smell to high heaven to work.
     
  6. yeppa

    yeppa New Member

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    636
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    Topeka, Kansas
    Earl--That was actually a joke picture taken at work. I've been there 35 years, but the last jobs are going to Mexico in a month or so. Come to think of it--it kinda' is a detention center---and I'm getting paroled soon!
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

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    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Naturally, cats are going to be attracted to what attracts them, rather than what attracts us. A catfish's body is covered with scent receptors, rather than just its 'nose' or 'tongue' like ours. And there's a definite difference between 'stink' and 'strong odor'. Rotted shad stink! Limburger cheese has a strong odor. I've tried commercial stink baits, I've used chicken livers treated to make them stinky, and I've tried half-rotted shad, all without much success. To be fair, I did recover a bloated striper that had turned white and was floating down the river, baited with chunks of it, and did very well, but I don't know if it was because the skin and a little meat stayed on the hooks, while the turtles immediately ate the shad off, or whether it was the scent. As a general rule, though, the fresher the bait, the better I do with it. So I would have to say that a block of frozen ground shad, skipjack, or carp would make a good chum; also, you'll find a number of recipes on the board on how to make and use chum made from soured grains of various types.
     
  8. fshnutz

    fshnutz New Member

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    Sacramento California