Catching shad?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Gabowman, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. Gabowman

    Gabowman Member

    Messages:
    311
    State:
    Georgia
    When crappie fishing I usually put a couple of submersible lights out just 12" or so deep in the water off the side of the boat and usually have shad running all underneath the lights in 15-30 minutes afterwards. My question is....is there an easier way to catch the shad without having to wait for then to draw near the lights when going catfishing? I havent been setting lights out in the water at nite when catfishing. Will this hurt the bite from the catfish if I did, and do any of you guys use lights in the water on a regular basis when catfishing? I'm assuming a cast net would be the easiest way to catch the shad (although I've caught a few with a minnow tank net already)? What size cast net would you recommend?
     
  2. paleocaver

    paleocaver New Member

    Messages:
    391
    State:
    USA
    I rarely night fish for cats but understand that any lights scare off flatheads. Blues and channels I don't know.

    As for other ways of catching bait. You can ease around with your fish finder and look for schools of shad and use your cast net.

    Anysize (diameter) net is OK. I use a 4' and a 6'. The mesh size is 1/" for the 4' net and 3/8 for the 6'.
     

  3. Kyle

    Kyle New Member

    Messages:
    347
    State:
    Kansas City - Olathe
    The two ways I have the most luck catching shad are 1. Just as the sun is going down usualy you will see schools of shad popping the surface, you have to look real carefully..and I do my best to sneak up on them and cast right over them..gotta shut off the big engine a good 50 + yards away usualy, and the trolling motor will scare them alot of times too, depends on the lake. 2. The light method you already mentioned, its pretty much a sure fire way to get shad.. Personaly I don't use lights at night when catfishing but I've never tried it so not sure on that one..as for the cast net, I'd start out with a smaller one, like a 5' or 7 footer..then once you get it down move up to a larger one if you feel its nessicary. I use a 17 footer and its almost too big, I caught just as many shad with my smaller ones..I'd send you one of my old ones if I was back home..they're only like $20 - $30 at wally world though. Most of them also come with a 'how to cast' instructional video. If you do get one, make sure you know whats on the bottom of the lake where your casting, cause it really sucks snagging them things up in brushpiles and whatnot. Best of luck to ya'!!
     
  4. Gringoloco

    Gringoloco Member

    Messages:
    426
    State:
    Ft. Belvoir, VA
    Name:
    Josh
    I dont think the lights would be a good idea, sense cats are more of a roaming fish at night. I think using the light would scare off any cats near your fishing spot. Verus a floating Crappie light works at night because Crappies are more active during the day and think its day light out again. Now if this is the only way you can catch shad then use the light to bring them to the surface at a spot that isnt where you are fishing. I use a 4' diameter cast net.
     
  5. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    If you can throw a cast net, all you need to do is get yourself in areas where shad are likely to be and go to work. May take an hour or more to find them, but if they're in the area, you'll catch them. I'm not often on the water right at sundown, so waiting for them to flip isn't an option.

    Once you learn where to look for them on your lake, they're a lot easier to find.
     
  6. lock52_fisherman

    lock52_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    47
    State:
    Illinois
    I'm not sure where your fishing but most shad will hang out at the mouths of creeks or somewhere there is not alot or no current. I use a 4 foot cast net and let it pull my boat around that way i'm not making alot of noise with a paddle or trolling motor. early morning or night time i have found to be the most productive in catching shad