Catch - Photo - Release for MO

Discussion in 'LOCAL MISSOURI TALK' started by TeamWhiskers, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    Catch - Photo - Release Does anyone know if there is anything written about this from our Conservation dept here in MO concerning the catfish?
     
  2. Bigbluefisherman

    Bigbluefisherman New Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    State:
    Missouri
    I havent heard of anything about that...I wish they would though!
     

  3. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    CPR for Fish!

    by Kevin Richards

    Successful catch-and-release fishing requires special handling.

    Catch-and-release makes good sense. It provides more fish for more anglers to catch more often. But, catch-and-release itself has a “catch.” If people don’t handle fish properly, the fish won’t survive after being released.

    That’s why fish managers, including this old fisheries biologist, like to think about CPR for fish. CPR doesn’t mean giving the fish mouth-to-mouth resuscitation—imagine that! Instead, it stands for Catch, Pamper and Release. Pampering, or taking good care of the catch before releasing it, helps ensure its survival.

    CPR is necessary for both voluntary catch-and-release and for when regulations require anglers to release fish they catch.

    Voluntary catch-and-release is more common than you might think. It’s a modern philosophy that’s evolved as fishing has become more of a sport and less of a means of putting food on the family table.

    Sport anglers enjoy the process of finding, fooling and catching fish. To increase the prospects for future enjoyment, they release their fish to, as they often say, “fight another day.”

    Surveys show that many anglers who target bass, trout and muskie release most of the fish they catch. They might keep the trophy of a lifetime, but they are just as likely to snap a photo of it and return it to the water.

    Many anglers are even releasing catfish and crappie, typically thought of as food fish. It’s the fun and satisfaction of successful fishing they seek, not the flesh of the fish.

    Tournament fishing has done much to spread the catch-and-release philosophy. Tournaments that end in a fish-fry have become exceedingly rare.

    Almost all bass and walleye tournaments require anglers to keep fish alive so they can be released. They even deduct points if a fish is dead or near death at the weigh-in. This requirement has led to innovations in livewell design and tournament weigh-in procedures that better protect fish until they can be released.

    Fishing regulations often require catch-and-release. Some areas that receive a lot of fishing pressure or that are being managed to protect or rebuild fish populations have areas or seasons in which only catch-and-release fishing is allowed.

    Fish shorter than the legal length limit also have to be released immediately after being caught. It’s important for anglers not to disregard undersized fish as “shrimps,” but to treat them as fish that have not yet reached the legal limit. They may someday grow to be trophies. Their chances of growing larger are reduced, however, unless they are provided CPR.

    The procedure for effective catch-and-release is similar for most species.

    Avoid Stress

    What usually kills or fatally injures fish is the combination of stress they experience during capture, hook removal and handling. Temperature, the amount of oxygen available and the length of time between catch and release also come into play.

    Anglers should strive to minimize stress on fish during capture by landing them quickly, before they exhaust themselves with fighting. A fish that comes in completely worn out has less chance for survival. That’s why it’s important to match your tackle size and line strength to the species you are targeting. It’s a fact that you can land large fish on ultra-light lines, but the lunkers will have lower survival rates after being released.

    The best method for releasing fish is one that you are familiar with and have practiced. You can use a landing net or you can grab the fish’s lip between your thumb and forefinger. If you know you’re not going to keep the fish, it might be better to free the hook with needle-nose pliers or forceps while the fish is still in the water.

    When handling fish, keep fingers away from the gills and eye sockets.

    It’s OK to snap a picture of a fish before releasing it, just be careful not to drop the fish on the floor of a boat or on the ground. When measuring a fish, wet your hands and the measuring board prior to laying the fish on it and don’t let fish come into contact with any dry surfaces. You want to avoid disturbing the slime or mucous covering on the fish’s body that protects the fish from infection.

    Remove hooks carefully so that you don’t injure the fish’s gills or internal organs. If the fish has swallowed the hook or the hook is deeply embedded, cut the line rather than trying to force the hook out.

    In some cases, you can use wire-cutters or the cutting portion of needle-nose pliers to cut the barb from the hook, allowing easy removal. It’s easy to replace the hook with another. Often, anglers who expect to release fish flatten the barbs of their hooks. The hooks don’t pull out as long as line is kept taut, but they slip out easily when it comes time to release the fish.

    If a legal-size fish is deeply hooked or there is excessive bleeding, consider keeping the fish and making a good meal of it.

    Never stringer a fish that you plan to release. Stringers damage a fish’s gills.

    When you release a fish do it carefully. Don’t just toss it. It might be stunned by the impact with the water, or it could land on rocks or sticks.

    When releasing an exhausted fish, hold it upright by its tail and move the fish very slowly forward and back until it recovers enough to swim away on its own.

    Water temperature dramatically affects the survival rate of released fish. In spring and fall, when water temperatures are less than 80 degrees, properly handled bass often have survival rates over 90 percent, if immediately released, or even under delayed-release situations, such as bass tournaments.

    However, as water temperatures climb above 80 degrees the chances of bass survival decrease sharply. Missouri Department of Conservation fisheries biologists cooperated with Mississippi State University to assess survival of bass that were caught, weighed in and released by anglers during summer tournaments. Release survival was less than 50 percent, even when anglers did all they could to pamper the bass.

    The high mortality rate seems to be due to the combined effects of handling, confinement and high water temperatures, and the presence of largemouth bass virus. Warm water in livewells provides an environment under which this and other fish pathogens can thrive and rapidly infect healthy fish. Nearly all of Missouri’s large lakes have tested positive for largemouth bass virus.

    Water temperature is also a key factor in catch-and-release survival of cool- and cold-water fish such as trout, muskies or walleye. Walleye studies have shown that release survival rates decrease at temperatures above 70 degrees.

    During warm-water periods, all tournament organizers should consider alternatives to the standard weigh-in format. Several muskie tournaments in Missouri have combined digital photography and on-the-water witnesses to verify catches so fish can be released immediately. Fish also require oxygen, which they get from the water. A fish out of water is like a person with his or her head underwater.

    Try holding your breath while you are unhooking, photographing or transporting a fish, and you’ll understand the oxygen deprivation a fish might be experiencing. Make every effort to release fish quickly. Keep the camera ready so you can take pictures quickly.

    Fish kept in overcrowded or poorly aerated livewells also suffer from oxygen deprivation.

    A constant flow of fresh, cool, aerated water through the livewell will help maintain a healthy environment for the fish. Because cooler water holds more oxygen, and fish in cooler water consume less oxygen, some anglers and researchers recommend adding ice to the livewell. However, it is important not to cool the livewell water more than 10 degrees below the surface temperature of the lake to avoid creating a temperature shock for the fish.

    A livewell additive that can reduce stress is common, uniodized table salt. Add one-third of a cup of salt per 5 gallons of water in the livewell. This is similar to the concentrations used in many hatchery transport vehicles.

    The best way to pamper a fish that you’re not going to keep is to reduce the length of time between catching and releasing it. Any confinement, whether the fish are held in a livewell, a weigh-in bag or a pickle bucket, can reduce survival rates, especially when the water is warm.

    Immediate release gives fish the best chance to live. Whether you are required by law to practice catch-and-release, or do so voluntarily, do all you can to increase the chances of survival for that fish. Practice CPR.

    Note. I have asked Kevin before to reprint his articles and he does not mind.
    Source: http://www.mdc.mo.gov/conmag/2006/05/40.htm
     
  4. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    Instead of using uniodized table salt as per the article. I will use a more pure form of salt being meat tenderizing salt and less of it.
     
  5. Todd Strong

    Todd Strong Active Member

    Messages:
    1,023
    State:
    Cambridge, Ne

    Good article Vince, thanks. The salt helps with the waters salinity.

    A 3ppT or 5 ppT (parts per thousand) salt solution is equivalent to 0.3% or 0.5% salinity, or 3 or 5 grams per liter, or 3 or 5 teaspoons of salt per gallon. Remember, a level tablespoon is equivalent to three level teaspoons. This is the standard recommendation for salt treatment for skin parasites and for Ich.

    salt in the water merely acts as an irritant. It is true that the increased flow of mucus can help slough off incipient parasites. Salt in the water "protects the fish from parasites." I find this to be stretching a point. Salting the water to increase the mucus layer is like putting a drop of lemon juice in your dry eye to make it water.

    Salt and nitrite uptake. The chloride ion of salt has the desirable ability to inhibit the uptake of nitrite into fishes' blood.

    During shipping, fishes' excreted ammonia can form nitrite, and the addition of enough salt to make a 1% solution has been found to cut shipping losses by as much as 90% in commercial practice.
    Nitrite is toxic, as you know. Fish that are stricken with nitrite poisoning get lethargic. With higher levels they may gasp as if they were suffocating and die with their gillcovers open wide. The nitrite ion has the damaging habit of occupying the place on a hemoglobin molecule where oxygen ought to be carried. The resulting molecule, called "methemoglobin" carries no oxygen. Under the influence of high NO2 levels, the fish may suffer from "brown blood" syndrome or methemoglobinemia.
     
  6. midmocat

    midmocat New Member

    Messages:
    61
    State:
    MO
    The thing that i have found that totally relaxes them and they do the best I have ever seen is running 99% oxygen on them it makes them so happy and they will not die. The fight getting them back into the river is just as big as pulling them out they are so lively.
     
  7. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    The best you can do is install and oxygen tank in your boat for your live well. Since fish breath 100% oxygen and the air we breath is only about 21% oxygen. What I did this year is install an 1100GPH keep alive aerator system in my live well. I also put my fill pump for the live well on a timer that I can control the interval that it puts fresh water into the tank. I leave the aerator and the fill pump on the whole time fish are in the tank. It works and I can control the amount of air that gets injected into it. Its not the same as an oxygen tank but it's better then just a recirculating aerator pump. Another thing I bought is a fish tank ammonia monitor and a floating thermometer. Also by placing catch N Release or other products like this in your live well helps a ton, or keeping your bait alive as well.

    http://keepalive.net/guide.htm
    http://www.massbass.com/conservation/In the livewell part2 sec 2.htm
     
  8. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    The article at http://keepalive.net/guide.htm also reads that "CAUTION: TOO MUCH OXYGEN WILL KILL YOUR FISH!"
    It is also recommended in the other article... The single most important factor in maintaining the health of your catch is keeping the oxygen level in the livewell water above 5 ppm.
    Isnt this far from 100% oxygen?
     
  9. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Not positive, but I believe its the carbon dioxide levels in the water that kills the fish in a tank that doesnt not allow for the circulation of the air. While oxygen in the tank is absolutely critical, I believe you have to have a means for allowing the CO2 do vent itself off of the top. CO2 is the byproduct of a fish, and humans, that is given off by the change of oxygen in the lungs. I also believe that EXCESSIVE amounts of oxygen can kill them also. There was a really good article I had on livewells and oxygen levels and how to keep fish alive. I'll see if I can drag that one up also. Thx for the article.
     
  10. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    You are correct you want your water to have around 5-6 ppm. I should of made my self little bit more clear when I said 100% oxygen. Fish breath oxygen right? The air we breath is only 21% oxygen or there abouts. So do we agree that without an oxygen bottle we are not giving the fish 100% oxygen? By the way you can control the air flow on the tank.....
     
  11. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    That works. I have not used it because I recirculate the water quite often and use a bilge pump spraying the water to put back in the oz level. The main key is to vent off the air like Cuz says.
     
  12. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    I know it's a little off of the subject, but since we are talking about CPR, I figured that I would put in my two sense. I admit, until I found this site and was "educated" I was as guilty as the next guy on keeping big fish. Me and a buddy of mine over the past few years pretty much kept everything we caught, which were several big flatheads and some blues up into the 60+ pound range. Now, that I found this site back in February, you can guarantee that won't happen again. I still ocasionally get a few small eaters for myself, but I can guarantee if your in my boat and you want to keep a 20+lb fish, it ain't gonna happen. In fact me and that same buddy were out the other night, and we made about a 15 mile run down river. Once anchored and tight lined, I realized that I forgot my scale. Normally I wouldn't care, but I am in the fish off right now, and I wanted to have it in case I hooked a good one. Anyway the remark was made that if I caught one, I could just weigh it back at the house that night. I kinda laughed and told him that, that wasn't going to happen. He didn't have much to say after that. This reminds me to a conversation myslef, him and another fishing buddy had earlier in the year, while sitting in the boat, about the possibilty of catching a world class or world record fish, what we would do with it. I said "CPR." They said "Just think of the filets we could get off of it" Needless to say there was a yelling match that day. I must admit though, I have been drilling the CPR into his head, and he has actually released fish alive this year instead of killing each and every one of them. Same thing goes for my dad. I get a chewing from him everytime I go out and catch and release fish. Same scenario. I am the one who goes to work every day and spends my hard earned money on my boat, equipment, baits, fuel, ect, so If I practive CPR, that is my choice. I'll be danged if I keep everythig i and come home and clean fish so somebody else can have it. Seems like I have people calling me all the time wanting to know if I can catch them some fish for a fish fry. They get the same response. "I catch and Release. If you want some fish, buy your own boat, and catch your own fish!" Now.. I have nothing at all against anyone who keeps fish for themselves. I do believe, if you spend your hard earned money and your boat, equipment, ect, that is your right, if it is done legally and ethical. But if you pull out 3 60 pounders in one day and kill them, that is far from ethical. I guess what I am saying is please practice "Selective Harvest".
     
  13. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    I know it's a little off of the subject, but since we are talking about CPR, I figured that I would put in my two sense. I admit, until I found this site and was "educated" I was as guilty as the next guy on keeping big fish. Me and a buddy of mine over the past few years pretty much kept everything we caught, which were several big flatheads and some blues up into the 60+ pound range. Now, that I found this site back in February, you can guarantee that won't happen again. I still ocasionally get a few small eaters for myself, but I can guarantee if your in my boat and you want to keep a 20+lb fish, it ain't gonna happen. My boat, my rules. In fact me and that same buddy were out the other night, and we made about a 15 mile run down river. Once anchored and tight lined, I realized that I forgot my scale. Normally I wouldn't care, but I am in the fish off right now, and I wanted to have it in case I hooked a good one. Anyway the remark was made that if I caught one, I could just weigh it back at the house that night. I kinda laughed and told him that, that wasn't going to happen. He didn't have much to say after that. This reminds me to a conversation myslef, him and another fishing buddy had earlier in the year, while sitting in the boat, about the possibilty of catching a world class or world record fish, what we would do with it. I said "CPR." They said "Just think of the filets we could get off of it" Needless to say there was a yelling match that day. I must admit though, I have been drilling the CPR into his head, and he has actually released fish alive this year instead of killing each and every one of them. Same thing goes for my dad. I get a chewing from him everytime I go out and catch and release fish. Same scenario. I am the one who goes to work every day and spends my hard earned money on my boat, equipment, baits, fuel, ect. So if I practice CPR, that is my choice. I'll be danged if I keep everything I catch, and come home and clean fish all night so somebody else can have it. Seems like I have people calling me all the time wanting to know if I can catch them some fish for a fish fry. They get the same response. "I catch and Release. If you want some fish, buy your own boat, and catch your own fish!" Now.. I have nothing at all against anyone who keeps fish for themselves. I do believe, if you spend your hard earned money and your boat, equipment, ect, that is your right, if it is done legally and ethical. But if you pull out 3 60 pounders in one day and kill them, even though it is legal, it is far from ethical. I guess what I am saying is please practice "Selective Harvest" so we all can have big fish to catch in the future.
     
  14. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    Sorry for posting twice. I guess I hit the enter button somewhere in there. I don't know how to get rid of the first one.
     
  15. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Good Post Gary. Thx for the story.
     
  16. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    An Gary, THAT is why you are always welcome in my boat.
     
  17. slider

    slider New Member

    Messages:
    581
    State:
    louisiana, mo
    gary that was a outstanding post thank you very much i have been in the same boat with people wanting to keep the big fish thanks again