Casting...

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by CatfishHateMe, Dec 1, 2006.

  1. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il
    what technique do you guys cast farthest using and what size pole/reels work best for casting long distances? i use 10' HT enterprises catfish poles m/h action and spinning reels that came with em by HT also. i can get about 65 yards casting distance but theres a big hole with part of a derailed train in it under a bridge where im gunna start hittin more often but its about 100 yards out kindda at an angle cuz you cant get any closer to it cuz of the bank being to steep.
     
  2. neocats

    neocats New Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    State:
    Steubenvil
    I think the idea of long distance casting deserves a whole study on its own. THe techniques must be mastered and practiced a lot to be consistent. It would take a long time to explain these details.
     

  3. CharlieD

    CharlieD New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Lincoln,Ar
    I had a simular problem- I couldn't master casting to the 100 yd mark. my salution---- I built a remote control boat- I can now fish 250 yds from where i sit.
     
  4. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il

    1. I practice every chance i can get, i keep my poles with a 4 oz wieght tied to the end to where i can just go out and cast when im bored and theres nothing to do.

    and 2. thats pretty freakin sweet:lol: im feelin a new winter project comin along for me:roll_eyes:

    i also think one of my problems is im releaseing the line to early and its goin to high when i could be casting out a little farther, i have to pound this in my head everytime i cast cuz if i dont then i do it over and over.
     
  5. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    There are a couple of ways for distance casting. I like the pendulem cast. do a search under video and check it out. It increased my casting distance a good bit. If you rod can handle it drill a hole through a baseball and rig thatr onto your line when you practice. One more point is when trying to distance cast make sure you have a shock leader it could save ou and the ones around you some pain and injury. A shock leader is a heavier line attached to your main line that runs the length of your pole and several rounds around your reel. My rule of thumb for how big of a shock leader to use is 10 pounds for every ounce i.e. 4 ounces of weight and 2 ounce bait is a 60 pound shock leader. I usually rig with 50 pound shock leader and have not had any problems with it. Good luck.
     
  6. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    One tip that has done me well is that you can lengthen the arc and the speed which gives you distance by letting out about 1/2- 3/4 the length of your rod in line creating a pendulum effect. I also cast further with 3 oz's rather than 4. When you hang that weight down there make sure no one is around and then practice getting it to swing and release it at about 10-11 oclock. It should show you immediate results. Try it and good luck.
     
  7. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    One other cast I like if there is room is the side arm undershot sling. take the rod back but instead of following through overhand bring it to the side with the rod tip below the butt of the rod and sling in the air with an upward motion. that will allow you full speed.

    Don't try this with liver. :big_smile:
     
  8. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il

    what kind of knot would you recommend for a shock leader?
     
  9. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    I use a 7 foot casting rod, bass casting weights, and 20 lb test.
     
  10. catfishing is fun

    catfishing is fun New Member

    Messages:
    545
    State:
    Missouri/Michigan
    i two sometimes have the way up in the air problem, its like a habbit, and its hard to break, but work on letting go of your rod when its at like 10 0clock. hope this helps
     
  11. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Do a search on the web for distance casting tournamets. One thing you'll find is they don't use small 10' poles. In this case, bigger is better. Stick with the spinning for distance also.
     
  12. Douglas Foster

    Douglas Foster New Member

    Messages:
    179
    State:
    SW Oklahoma
    I suggest checking out some of the surf fishing sites. They have posts about casting techniques and shock leaders, knots, ect. Lots of useful information. Fish on!!!
     
  13. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    I also recommend the surf fishing sites. Those guys are the day to day experts at distance casting for fish with both weight and bait on the line. The techniques used by casting tournament participants may have some relevance, but if you examine them closely, they most likely are using lighter line and very long poles, 15 ft or more. Of course, a lighter line with any casting will result in a gain in distance.
     
  14. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Jayson, there are a number of factors, other than technique, that affect casting distance...first, and most obvious, is rod length.

    Longer rods will give higher tip speeds, hence longer casts. How long? Depends on the user. A big, strong guy might be able to handle a 15' rod...most of us, though, are more comfortable with something in the 10-12 foot range.

    Type and diameter of your line are important. All other things being equal, a smaller diameter line will cast further, for a couple of reasons...wind resistance is one. The other is a smaller line won't go so deep into your spool at the end of the cast, which reduces friction in the case of a spinning reel, and keeps spool speed down on a casting reel. Competitive casters use a very light running line, knotted to a heavy shock leader (use a double uni-knot, to answer your question). In the real world, you'll need a stronger running line...braids will give you reasonably strong line/small diameter compromise.

    Type/size bait is very influential, again, due to wind resistance. A piece of cut bait will very often "windmill", which will shorten a cast dramatically. On the other hand, worms are like casting a bare hook...they go forever. Sometimes you have to compromise on your bait selection to get the distance you need.

    As far as technique is concerned, there are probably some DVDs out there that you'll find helpful. Distance casting is like throwing a javelin. It's an athletic endeavor that requires athleticism to be really good, but most of us mortals still manage to do pretty well.

    Good luck!
     
  15. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Jayson,
    Research all you can about beach casting techniques. Casting a long way is only half of the equation. You have to deviler a hook that still has bait on it and a terminal rig that is not tangled. The beach casting guys have all this stuff down and can easily deliver a bait 150 yards, more if necessary. You don't need fancy gear to cast 100yds but you will need to refine the business end to arrive intact...W
     
  16. MattShannon

    MattShannon New Member

    Messages:
    829
    State:
    WV
    Get a long run for it and sling that sucker like your life depends on it.:lol:
     
  17. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    Improved blood knot is what i use are a barrel knot
    here is the improved
    www.fish4fun.com/knots.htm
     
  18. spanishcatman

    spanishcatman New Member

    Messages:
    133
    State:
    United Kingdom
    Casting a genuine 100 yards is no easy feat - especially with a decent sized bait and good strength line. The other problem is that a lot of baits won't take the kind of forces generated with a real 'Oh Hell Let's Go For It!' throw. They fly off, tangle or (if alive) die from the shock. I saw one of the posts on this thread mentioned a radio controlled boat. They really work. The UK carp fishermen use them a lot on lakes where real boats are banned. They can take a good sized bait, plus some loose feed (you call it chum?) out wherever you want and drop the lot on a sixpence - under overhanging trees, wherever. They give you a real edge in some situations. I don't think they are too difficult to make if you're technically minded (which I'm not!). There are a lot of small businesses making them for the european market now but they are quite expensive. Here is a link to one place which sells a good, simple and efficient bait boat. You need to stick a little cover over the bait compartment if using lives to stop them jumping out! http://www.castaway-tackle.co.uk/ProductsList/mcs/CategoryID/110/GroupID/2/CatName/Bait+Boats/

    Maybe you could make something similar? The other alternative is to take the great casting advice offered on this thread and keep practicing :)