Casting baitcasters

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Katphish, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. Katphish

    Katphish New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    tennessee
    What is the correct way to cast a baitcaster so that you dont get a "birds nest"?
     
  2. jlingle

    jlingle New Member

    Messages:
    1,036
    State:
    Altus, Okl
    When you release your thumb off the spool, keep light pressure on the spool and "thumb it" a little bit. As soon as your bait touches down, apply firm pressure to the spool again to stop it from spinning.

    Sounds easy, but it took me a while to master it. The good news is that I mastered it when I was 8 years old, and you can figure it out too. Getcha a decent sized weight or plug (with no hooks of course) and get out in the yard and practice. You'll figure it out in no time, it's not that difficult. Good luck.
     

  3. savage308

    savage308 New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Victoria, Texas
    The correct way to cast a bait caster without birdnesting is as follows....

    1. Release the reel brake

    2. Pull the rod directly behind your back

    3. Drop the rod in the boat and cast your spinning rod..........

    Sorry I'm no help I'm a spinning reel man myself...
     
  4. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    there are many tips but practice makes perfect. 1st tip adjust the brake so that i only drops the weight when the rod is flexed. the little knob under the drag and reel handle. after doing this pratice awhile you will get better with practice as you start casting this way slowly loosen the brake up as you get better this will increase the distance of your cast. 2nd tip keep your line full I like mine about an 1/8" from the rim. 3rd tip use your thumb to stop the line when your bait hits the water this will stop the freespool and keep your line from backlashing. PRACTICE< PRACTICE<PRACTICE.
     
  5. Katphish

    Katphish New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    tennessee
    alright thanks a lot fellas.
     
  6. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    Let me add that when I cast I also turn the reel on its side so that the handel is up, its supposed to let the reel spin with less resistance; this is for distance though not accuracy
     
  7. Redd

    Redd New Member

    Messages:
    790
    State:
    Southeast Kansas
    There's a real nice, step by step, how to, kinda article in the BOC library. It gives you great tricks and everything. Good luck!

    -Red
     
  8. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    You don't even need to go near the water, but you do have to practice, practice, practice and practice a little bit more. You have to pay your dues and the bird nest is just a part of the fees.
     
  9. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    A lot of successful casting is how you accelerate the payload. With spinning it can be any old way. With baitcasters acceleration must be smooth! You can't just flip the rod in halfhearted casts. It needs to go from all the way behind you to all the way in front and smoothly. You can alter things when you get better but that is how you start.
     
  10. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    :lol: You all make it sound so darn easy.Guess I haven't got it mastered cause I get lots of bird nest and then hope nothing hit the bait till I get rid of the big bird nest. With my nests I think I'd make an Eagle proud.:roll_eyes:
    Guess I'd better pratice a lot more.
     
  11. malaki

    malaki New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Redmon Illinois
    i sold mine and never looked back! lol
     
  12. catfishsteve

    catfishsteve New Member

    Messages:
    111
    State:
    Omaha, NE
    Adjust your spool tension so that the weight of the lure/bait only barely pulls line from the reel with the spool released. Test by hold the rod level with the ground and lightly bouncing the tip with the lure/bait so that the rod tip flexes down a bit from level. Your lure/bait should not hit the ground. Tighten up until it only drops a foot of so and then stops when you bounce it.

    This is a good setting to start with. You can adjust as you go and get better.

    Braided line is actually easier to handle, I think, on a baitcaster, than mono. Maybe give it a try. It has it's own set of peculiarities, but braid casts real nice on a baitcaster.

    Toss with a smooth motion from behind, overhead and out to your target. Keep your thumb on the spool and feather the line out as it goes.

    Stop the spool when the lure/bait hits the water.

    A lot more spool tension than needed is way better than a a bit less spool tension than needed.


    Run out about 30-40 ft off line off your reel. About the lenghth of a long cast.
    Then put a piece of electrical tape around the line remaining on the spool and reel the 30-40 feet in over the tape and cast with just that length to start.

    This way, if you get a backlash, it will only be with that first 30-40 ft at most and not the whole spool, which can happen otherwise!!

    :big_smile:

    Practice a lot. Beware of wind in you face!!
     
  13. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Some very good tips.

    My feeeling is that you need to educate your thumb until it thinks for itself. An easy way to start is by putting a 1 to 1 1/2 oz sinker on your line. I would suggest backing off on the casting brake so the sinker can pull line and fall to the ground when the rod is held horizontally and you take your thumb off the spool. Practice using your thumb on the spool to stop the line at the exact instant the sinker hits the ground. Practice until you do it every time.

    Now pick a spot say 5 feet from you. Swing the sinker, release line and then stop the line at the exact instant the sinker hits the ground. Practice until you do it every time.

    Now pick a spot say 10 feet from you. Swing the sinker, release line and then stop the line at the exact instant the sinker hits the ground. Practice until you do it every time.

    Now pick a spot say 20 feet from you. Cast the sinker, release line and then stop the line at the exact instant the sinker hits the ground. Practice until you do it every time.

    Now pick a spot say out further. Cast the sinker, release line and then stop the line at the exact instant the sinker hits the ground. Practice until you do it every time.

    Don't try for a distance record until you get good at casting. You may need to cast a long distance to get where Mr. Cat is feeding but ya know what. I find catfish feed along the bank where the small fish and other food is.

    I can cast a pretty fair distance but just don't usually find a need to do so.

    Practice, practice, practice.

    Oh, I almost forgot. When you feel you are getting pretty good, close your eyes or put on a blind fold and practice casting until you master it. After all on a dark night at 2 A.M. you will not be able to see.
     
  14. catseeman

    catseeman New Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    State:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    After casting out ,look at the spool the line should come directly off the spool and thru the level wind. If not pull the line off until it does. then reel up slack. more backlashes are caused from the line going acrosss the spool to the level wind than about anything else. Sometimes the line will snag in the middle of the cast when it does this.