Cast net questions

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by Monsterkat11, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. Monsterkat11

    Monsterkat11 New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Ohio
    purchased a cast net yesterday, did surprisingly well for using it the first time, i watch an instructional video for it, helped a ton. only problem is, i got it snagged yesterday and snapped three of the lines that pull the weights up.

    i'm assuming i can fix this with some hefty fishing line.
    my question is, has this happened to any of you before and how do you decide where to cast it? is there things i should be looking for?

    thanks a ton,
    korey
     
  2. BLKCLOUD

    BLKCLOUD New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Pulaski Tn
    the last one I bought was a 10' diameter net. I threw it once and got it hung in some tree roots and finally hooked my truck to it and pulled it out..there was nothing but a few lead sinkers left..you may want to retreive it as soon as it hits to keep from hanging the bottom..
     

  3. brandonleeraab

    brandonleeraab New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    louisiana
    fixing the draw lines should not be a problem . i have been using cast nets for years and still dont have it down. I fish off of rocks and they love my net .Sometimes i think the river wants my net more than i do.most of the time my lines dont break they just come untied to fix mine i tie it back and cover the knot in super glue
     
  4. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    I replace the factory mono drop lines on mine with braided 80# dacron.
    The mono will hold memory and coil up after its been rolled up or stored. The dacron will not hold memory and makes the net softer and much easier to throw and open.
    It takes a little bit to replace them and works best if you have someone helping. Do one line at a time as you cut one off replace it with the new dacron before going to the next. This will keep them all in sequence and alligned in the proper position in the top ring.
    Avoid the rocks and trees.....:wink:
     
  5. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    My best advise is know what is on the bottom where you throw. Otherwise you yank it out with damage or crawl in after it.... kinda cold this time of year. Once you get some experience you will know where your best spots are to get bait.

    My favorite spots are flats on lakes following the bait fish or throwing near shore in snagless areas, below spillways, etc... Watch the birds and the surface of the water and usually you can see where the bait is.

    Good Luck.
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Obviously, it would be nice to only throw a net where the bottom is nice and smooth, with nothing to snag the net. But you gotta throw where the baitfish are, and that seems to be along the rocks in my area. Deciding just when to pull the cord is the problem. Pull it as soon as it hits the water, and the net closes over the baitfish; let it sink too much, and it's hung on the rocks. I've cut those lines you did, and replaced them with 50# test mono; I never thought about replacing all of them with something like dacron. I've also torn holes in the mesh of the net, and used similar sized mono to patch the hole. Even so, a net just doesn't seem to last more than a season of fairly heavy use, even if I'm lucky.
    To help keep from tearing up my cast net, I also have a long-handled dip net made of 1/2" hardware cloth. When the shad are running the rocks close to shore, or along a concrete wall, I can use this dip net instead of my cast net.
     
  7. Vonroc

    Vonroc New Member

    Messages:
    268
    State:
    Central Ohio
    Finding areas free of snags that produce is a problem. Sometimes finding the nets you like at stores in late season in another problem.I always try to keep a couple of new nets on hand at all times. I'm throwing 4 footers cost $20.00 a pop well worth the price. I do make repairs, but most of the time big snags shred the net. From the boat I throw in deep water very few snags, from the bank different story. I've learned by mistakes on the areas not to throw to as well as the good areas. Without a fish finder to show the bottom you learn very quickly.
     
  8. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    i do recomend buying cheaper and smaller nets, especially if you are inexperienced throwing.. larger nets are for those that have the technique down, and cost more to replace. i personally found this out myself. buy a 4 or 5 footer, practice daily in the back yard and then move up in size. this will help you dramatically!!! rollo
     
  9. impak209

    impak209 New Member

    Messages:
    105
    State:
    Toledo, Ohio, U
    also to avoid your mono lines from getiing memory bends from storage don't forget to hang you net with the weights pulling at the bottom it streches and straightens the net out it makes for better throwing having been stored in such a way.
    It says on most instructions, personally I never paid much attention to it until "smokingjoe", and me did a side by side comparison between his and mine, now I hang mine all the time
     
  10. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    goodpoint!..i would also like to add, now that i think about it....skip told me to soak the net in fabric softner mixed with hot water in a 5 gal. bucket...seemed to free it up also..might try that..:wink: rollo