Cast Net questions

Discussion in 'Castnet(s)' started by magicman22, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. magicman22

    magicman22 New Member

    Messages:
    29
    I am thinking about buying my first cast net. Not sure what type or mesh size I should get. What works better...mono or nylon? One person noted to buy the cheapest one because its less of a loss when it gets destroyed. I would like one that would catch minnows and also larger sunfish. Mesh size choices are 1/4" and 3/8" being the most common. This will be used from the bank in usually shallow water. I am looking for all knowledgable members to help me spend my hard earned cash wisely!! Thanks
     
  2. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    I would reccomend a 4 foot net starting out with. It wiil be easier to throw than the larger nets until you become effecient with it. If your after minnows the smaller mesh will be better. There are some great threads on this (I know whistler has posted many) Go to the top of the page and under search type in cast nets. Pratice in your yard or a open area, be patient and you will soon be catching all the bait you need. Just don't let it sink to deep if your throwing in shallow water with rocks or snags, or you will be wadeing out to retrieve it. Hey part of haveing them is learning how to sew them back up though LOL. Good Luck!
     

  3. tspergin

    tspergin New Member

    Messages:
    867
    State:
    newark ohio
    magicman check with your local laws about catching sunfish or bluegills with a cast net,in most states it is illegal. only rough fish can be harvested
     
  4. magicman22

    magicman22 New Member

    Messages:
    29
    thanks for the heads up tspergin, here in Iowa green sunfish is allowed to be caught and used for bait but not the bluegill.
     
  5. fwmud

    fwmud New Member

    Messages:
    693
    State:
    Wilson's Mills,nc
    Magic, I used to buy the expensive cast nets till I destroyed 2 beyond repair.
    I now just get the walleyworld specials then save tore ones to cut and patch others that still have some life in them.
    Start small and work your way up. Have fun
    1/4 or 3/8 is fine.
     
  6. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Man I am sorry I can not help with the cast net subject. I could not learn how to throw these nets :eek:
     
  7. Abu

    Abu New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Hemlock,Ohio
    I bought a cast net and drove myself crazy until I learned to throw it. More often I use an umbrella net near dams with a long rope to get fresh shad before I go fishing. Not sure of the cast net laws in my state so I will only say I use the cast net for catching different baitfish in ponds. :D
    Abu
     
  8. magicman22

    magicman22 New Member

    Messages:
    29
    so I am guessing that monofilament or nylon material does not make much of a difference? is this correct? Thanks
     
  9. dafin

    dafin New Member

    Messages:
    1,461
    State:
    Manhattan,Kan
    I have found that nylon opens a little easer. Mono sinks faster and is better in deeper water .
     
  10. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Magicman.I came along during the transition period for cast nets.From hand to machine made nets.From Sea Island Cotton,to Nylon,to monofiliment.The people who made,used and patched these nets seemed to agree on certain things.Based on same strength of twine.Not same diameter twine.I will rate them 1,2 &3,with 1 first,or best and 3 last.Cutting,tearing and snagging resistant.Cotton-#1,Nylon-#2.Mono.-#3.Ease of repair.Cotton-#1,Nylon-#2,Mono.-#3.Sinking speed.Mono.-#1,Nylon-#2,Cotton-#3.This is with salt water use,where shell will do the most damage.I I have spent many enjoyable hours,making,rigging and patching cast nets.I wish that I was still able.My daddy was from Mobile,Ala..Even living inland,we had to make runs to the coast to cast for mullet and shrimp.It is easer to learn to cast right and left handed.That way you can swap off,and cast steady,for 6 to 8 hours without tiring out.Learn with a small net,and then go to the size net that you can open,with a natural feel,or effort.Too large a net will work you to death,and you will not spend your time resting.I normaly cast for 6 hours steady,without rest,with someone rowing and handling the boat.peewee-williams
     
  11. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Yeah, smaller is better to start with. I bought a 5' first and it took quite a few trips with it till I figured out how to throw it. I threw an 8' the the other night and it actually opened easier than the 5', but it was a LOT harder on the shoulders bringing it back in. I still ordered one, though, after watching the shad my buddy was bringing in with his the the other night. I think the advice about cheaper is better is probably right. That first net I bought is somewhere at the bottom of the river 3 months after I got it and it had a lot of patches in it before that. Also, if you're throwing from the bank, a smaller net is easier to get distance with and still have it open. I can launch a 4' and have it open pretty good, but can't do nearly as well with a larger one.
     
  12. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    like they said check laws. in il the biggest you can use is a 8' with max pattern being 3/8".

    i use the $18 dollar ones from wal-mart. these are mono. they are easily repaired with 20-30# mono. i can tie holes up right on the boat with line even from my reel if i need to. i have had to re tie main lines several times as well.

    if tossing from banks i reccomend cheaper ones. these can be lost rather easliy tossing into shallow water. ive lost 4 in the past two seasons and the 5th has several patches. thats why i try and save whatever comes up when they do get snagged. and i make my own sinkers so the lead i cna use too.

    for minnows the smaller the pattern the better. and more so if ya want them alive. in my 3/8 pattern the small pinners we call them (1" shad) often bolt to try and get out of the net causing them to pass to beyond the gills in the mesh. then they are stuck ank pulling them out usually kills or tears off the heads. depends what ya are going to use em for. live or cut.

    most often my net the main lead line gets caught and several inches of it rips loose from the main netting. like before it can be fixed with strong mono line.
     
  13. bro_catfish

    bro_catfish New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Ohio ,Coshocton County
    I have an older mono cats net and Ive been thinking its a 5ft-er
    but that the length of it as its folded up and being held up..so when it opens its a 10ft-er?
    Or do they advertise them as . to be a 5 footer when opened? = casted?
     
  14. Ohio_River_Rat

    Ohio_River_Rat New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Charlestown, Indiana
    Yours is a 5ft net. They measure in the radius not the diameter. So you rnet from one side across to the other side is 10ft and the length from the outside to the middle is 5ft. When you see a 6ft net advertised it opens to be 12 feet
     
  15. bro_catfish

    bro_catfish New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Ohio ,Coshocton County
    Hey thanks alot!
    How big of a net do they make?
     
  16. Catfishhunter

    Catfishhunter New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lanesville, In.
    Magicman, Go to wallyworld and get you a 4 or 5ft. cheap castnet and when you tear it up beyond repair, cut the lead off and make you some sinkers and go buy another one...
     
  17. Ohio_River_Rat

    Ohio_River_Rat New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Charlestown, Indiana
    Yah. personnally i recommend going with a 5ft Betts Tyzac. Betts makes some great nets and their not all that expensive. Also if your thinkin of going bigger be sure to check state regulations on what size you can use cause there could be a limit. Im not claiming to be a expert in fact im a beginner and own a 5ft Tyzac and really like it. Also if you haven't ever thrown one go with the directions they provide. i manged to learn in just an afternoon from their directions.
     
  18. Boogan1

    Boogan1 New Member

    Messages:
    122
    State:
    Carrollton, MO
    I started out with a 4' mono net several years ago and it worked great for spot throwing, seeing the shad flip and throwing on them. As my shad catching progressed I moved up to a 6'net. Had a little trouble learning how to throw it until I saw the method a guy used on one of in-fishermen's catfish video's. I will try to explain it, once you figure it out the net will open perfect almost every time. If you are right handed, put your rope on your right wrist. Coil the rope in your right hand, making the loops away from your body. When you get to the net, make sure it is hanging straight and make one loop of the net into your hand, again make loop away from your body. I make my loops about as big around as a basketball. Reach straight down the net and pick up one of the weights with your left hand and hold it in the fingers of your right hand. Do this three times working around the net toward your body. Again working toward your body divide the remaining weights in half and hold these in your left hand. Stand facing the direction you want to throw. Cock right arm slightly behind you and turn to your right with your upper body. I hold my left hand close to my chest. You don't have to really heave the net. Just pivot at the waist bringing your right arm around. Just before your right hand gets 90 degrees to your chest release the net with your right hand and let the momentum of the net pull it out of your left hand. This puts a spin on the net and it will open perfect every time. I know it sounds kind of confusing, but a couple of practice throws and you will see what I mean. Boog
     
  19. etipriga

    etipriga New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    TX
    I prefer using a mono net just because its a whole lot easier to untangle sticks, and dont worry you are going to get plenty of sticks.

    When you first get the net throw it in your yard till u get the hang of it.

    Another thing i was thinking of one day is to tie another long rope on the plastic ring at the top of the net. That way if you get your net caught up around a rock or something you pull on the other rope and it should free the net. One problem with that though is that the ropes will prolly get tangled up so i guess you could tie the end of it to your foot to keep the ropes apart. It will prolly just take a little more practice with the 2 ropes to get it throwin it good.
     
  20. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    Need advice on fixing a net. I have several nets, but have never had to repair one bigtime. Back on New Year's Eve, I picked up a hand rope with swivel, ring, and shroud lines someone left off the bank at the WWD. I was back there today as the river has gone down, and the remaining net was reachable. I pulled it in, and it ripped off the lead line, but there are not any holes in the net. I doubt if it had been thrown but one time. I got the lead line in in two pieces, and it was snagged around a piece of rebar. This is at least a 6-ft net, TYZAC, and I'd like to put it back together for a spare. There's enough net left to make a 5-ft net after I trim it even, but how do I get the lead line on the hem of the net? Do I have to make all those whipknots, or is there an easier way?

    Thanks,

    Dennis