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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi members~

I ve been interested in carp fishing and noticed euro carp rods seem to be mostly graphite, less sturdy but maybe more sensitive..

I apologize my ignorance but was wondering what would be the benefit of those euro rod other than being lighter in weight. It seems typical light duty glass or composite catfish rod might do the job the same.

I guess my question is what do gain from a sensitive/delicate rod for bait fishing? I can understand the benefit for lure fishing since you need to detect bite to set the hook quickly but not sure the point of expensive euro carp rod.

Thank you for any input!
 

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Please excuse my ignorance. In the days when I couldn't afford to many rods and reels, I had a pretty much one size fit's all attitude about rods and reels. If I could catch a blue gill, why shouldn't I be able to catch a whale on the same rod? I don't know that I've come all that far today. I don't care for whippy rods unless it's on an ultra light set up. And not to crazy about really heavy rods other than my sturgeon rod. Then again I've never caught a sturgeon I don't think a med action rod couldn't have handled. At the same time I have only ever caught 12 of them and none were big enough to be legal! I have looked at and held $100+ rods and $15 rods and damned if I can see the advantage of a $100+ rod! I do have a lamiglass rod but I found it in an old building and have never used it. My favorite rods are Berkley Cherry something or other. They feel good and come in the right color for me. Not real crazy about ugly sticks but got one just the same and seems to work fine.

There must be a lot I don't know about choosing a rod! Pretty much the same with reels for me. Damned if I'm gonna spend $100+ on a reel if I can get one that works well for less. My favorite are ABU's and most expensive I have is a 6500 C3. Paid about $65 for it many years ago! These days what I hear about ABU is they are made in China now and not worth the money! All of mine were made in Sweeden. Have a problem with the Kastking Rover 40 I got for under $50 new. Thing seems to work as well as my ABU's but then again so does my Millionaire! I love my ABU's but did I waste money on them? My family calls me frugal!

Getting back to rods, I seem to have it figured out that for fish I'm liable to catch a medium action rod is just the ticket. Which one? Most people think I prefer the least expensive and they are close to right! I don't like white rods, bright yellow and don't care for the almost clear and whippy tip of an ugly stick. I strongly suspect most rods are made by pretty much anyone to a standard that would probably satisfy most anyone. Try this. Get a number of rods of different makes that don't have the maker's name on them. Try them all out and see which you like best. I mean just what can you do to a fiber glass or other material stick that is not done to another. years ago my dad took me to a friend of his shop that made custom fishing rods. They were those old solid fiber glass rods and I saw a pile of blanks waiting to be put together, they all appeared to be exactly the same! Only thing that seemed to change was what they'd write on the finished rod!
 

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Wish I could help but I can't. Growing up we had small rivers and impoundments we fished, carp was the fish we most often hooked into using a Zebco 33 and whatever glass rod we could afford, baiting with nightcrawler or crawdad. I would guess that dedicated carp fishing may be like ice fishing for panfish, sometimes the bite is so light a very sensitive rod may be necessary to detect it. We may have missed more bites than we caught on those muddy, skeeter infested drainage ditches with our rod handles stuck in the mud for a rod holder as a kid.
 

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Winston, Indiana
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With the hook/lead arrangements used in modern carp fishing, the bites are certainly not light or delicate, mostly they are screaming runs that leave no doubt about what is happening. Carp specific rods are not delicate; they are a combination of strength and feel and a good one will cast a bait 150 yards and yet not pull the hook if a big fish makes a lunge under the rod top.
I firmly believe that for most of us, most of our fish could be caught with an average, middle of the road rod.
Sure, it would be too heavy for eaters and too light for a big blue or flathead but mostly we’d get by with it.
That said, I’m also a big believer in using the right tool for the job. A screw dry can be used as a punch, a chisel or a pry bar and a vice grip can be used as a wrench but sooner or later this’ll bite you in the butt and you’ll damage something or hurt yourself.
I’m a reasonably competent angler but I cannot (nor do I want to) cast a fly with the same rods I use to pull blues from the Ohio River.
In the end though, it probably all comes down to personal choice….. or what we can afford!

…W
 

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It will be more about the area you are fishing. Heavy current vs none at all. Either way a sensitive rod with either catfish or carp is always a plus. Combine it with a baitrunner and you are set for carp fishing. Again, it all depends the environment you are fishing. Bass rods will handle most fish, current and lack of line capacity/drag will be the issue though. I like my Whisker Seeker Catfish and Carp series rod. Its pretty much a medium heavy bass rod with alot of bend. All graphite.
 

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Hi members~

I ve been interested in carp fishing and noticed euro carp rods seem to be mostly graphite, less sturdy but maybe more sensitive..

I apologize my ignorance but was wondering what would be the benefit of those euro rod other than being lighter in weight. It seems typical light duty glass or composite catfish rod might do the job the same.

I guess my question is what do gain from a sensitive/delicate rod for bait fishing? I can understand the benefit for lure fishing since you need to detect bite to set the hook quickly but not sure the point of expensive euro carp rod.

Thank you for any input!
I really wouldn't say that carp rods are delicate, as much as they are sensitive (I own more than a few). The thing about them that really sticks out, is that they are extremely light weight for as strong as they are. I caught a 29lb.-8oz. Flathead on one of my 2.25lb test curve Cabela's Predator rods. It handled that fish easily. The thing about carp is, sometimes they are finicky and shy about too much tension, when picking up a bait. They will sometimes drop your bait at the slightest feel of any resistance. Then at other times, they will just inhale your bait and take off like a rocket. I find that your rig plays a bigger part in catching carp than the rod. The thing is though, you need a longer rod in order to use some of these rigs. A 10 foot rod seems to be a decent minimum length rod, to use for carp fishing. The problem with a lot of American fishing rods is that once they get longer than 8 feet, these companies want to make them larger diameters like saltwater rods. The European carp rods prove that a fishing rod doesn't need to be of extreme diameter, in order to be strong. If you can find a decent medium-medium/heavy action rod that is 10 foot long, you should be able to catch all of the carp you want to on it. One last thing, get a good rod holder. Carp will sometimes take off with your gear. I've seen it happen to many people.

If you just want to give carp fishing a try, maybe you should look into buying a rod like this.
https://www.bigcarptackle.com/carp-...feeder-rod-glass-#product-details-tab-reviews

This Daiwa rod might not be a bad choice either, for a starter rod.
DAIWA BEEFKITTY 10ft MED/HVY SPINNING ROD | Catfish Connection

Below is a video of mine with just a 6lb carp on a 11ft Predator rod. Look at how hard it pulls at times.
 

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I agree with Winston (metalman). To me carp rods are just a different version of the same thing we use. I use three carp rods but only because I wanted to try them out. They are 9 foot composite 3.0 rated rods. That is about a med or med heavy. And I put baitrunner reels on them. Again because I wanted to try them.

Now, would a glass rod work? Yes, it would work just fine. A medium or med heavy glass rod with a soft (active) tip would do well. A bait caster with a clicker could be set to work like a baitrunner reel.

Like Metalman said carp grab the bait, feel the hook and run. Not light biters. A clicker on a reel will trigger the adrenaline quickly. Just remember that carp have a soft mouth is don’t be too aggressive with them.

Just keep in mind that carp are a great sport fishing species so do your best to take care of them to fight again.

tight lines
 

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Years ago I bought a 9" glass muskie rod blank, put guides on it and spinning reel, has been my carp rod for decades. The drag must work on whatever reel you use as they like to surge.
Line of braid with a smoke color seems to catch more than mono, now days I just use mono.
 

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Don from Glendale Arizona
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I guess my question is what do gain from a sensitive/delicate rod for bait fishing? I can understand the benefit for lure fishing since you need to detect bite to set the hook quickly but not sure the point of expensive euro carp rod.
I've been a carper for a long time, and I've found that playing the fish correctly with the rod you have is much more important than if the rod is an expensive euro model or a $15 Academy bait rod (which BTW is my favorite carp rod). I place far more importance on the terminal tackle and the reel. As has been said before, when a carp takes it they go, and as long as the rod isn't a broomstick I'm good.
 

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I much prefer using a hair rig which just means the bait is attached to the end of the leader and the bare hook is suspended about 1/4 inch under the bait. You can buy hair rigs but they are easy to make also. I prefer a hook size between #6 and #2.

you will also find it easy to make your own method feeder mix. I whip up my go to mix about an hour before I get on the water. If you can chum (each state has it’s own Regs) boiled field corn works well. Or store bought whole kernel corn in a pinch. If you get field corn, be sure and boil it well or it can swell up and kill fish.

If you need some light reading to do during the winter, read about the carp spawn. They are not like catfish, taking up a month for hatching and raising the kids. The eggs are cast out into the waters and the male adds his special tonic. Then they have better things to do. So if during the catfish spawn, you bummed out, switch to carp fishing. They can give your arm a workout.

tight lines
 

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Here’s my take. Carp rods have been designed by the guys in Europe where the carp is the supreme sport fish. They are based on techniques that they use and have success with. It’s pretty awesome that you can get a rod that weighs almost nothing and sling 3-4 oz of weight over 100 yards and still be sensitive enough to play a fish with a soft mouth. The light weight of the rod shouldn’t be associated with lack of toughness. It’s about feeling the fight and also not having hook pulls when those carp make their big runs. It’s similar to the way our catfish specific rods have been developed here. They’re based on what methods and techniques catfishermen use. Either rod will catch either species. I’ve had very good success carp fishing using catfish rods with a hybrid blank. The Whisker Seeker Cats and Carp spinning rods are an absolute blast to catch carp with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here’s my take. Carp rods have been designed by the guys in Europe where the carp is the supreme sport fish. They are based on techniques that they use and have success with. It’s pretty awesome that you can get a rod that weighs almost nothing and sling 3-4 oz of weight over 100 yards and still be sensitive enough to play a fish with a soft mouth. The light weight of the rod shouldn’t be associated with lack of toughness. It’s about feeling the fight and also not having hook pulls when those carp make their big runs. It’s similar to the way our catfish specific rods have been developed here. They’re based on what methods and techniques catfishermen use. Either rod will catch either species. I’ve had very good success carp fishing using catfish rods with a hybrid blank. The Whisker Seeker Cats and Carp spinning rods are an absolute blast to catch carp with.

Thank you for your insight. WS C&C rod came to my attention too although hoping for 2 pc rod. But it only has lure rating of 1 oz. Whats your experience slinging larger pva bag or method lead with dough? Does it cast well above rating?
 

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Thank you for your insight. WS C&C rod came to my attention too although hoping for 2 pc rod. But it only has lure rating of 1 oz. Whats your experience slinging larger pva bag or method lead with dough? Does it cast well above rating?
That would be my only complaint is the light lure rating. It does ok up to about 1.5-2oz, above that it is a very gentle lob. I use the Korda Bait up method leads at 1.25oz with pack bait and it's too much to make a hard cast. I bought some 1/4oz. cage feeders to try with pack bait, but haven't had a chance to try them yet. If you fish with PVA or pack baits they might not be the best option. They hold their own in terms of fighting fish, just can't cast the bulkier baits. Because of that I might be looking at different options for my main carp rigs.

One rod I'm looking at is the Nash Pursuit. They make a 7'-3lb test curve that is two piece. General rule is 1oz of lead for every pound of test curve. They are $113.00 at Big Carp Tackle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That would be my only complaint is the light lure rating. It does ok up to about 1.5-2oz, above that it is a very gentle lob. I use the Korda Bait up method leads at 1.25oz with pack bait and it's too much to make a hard cast. I bought some 1/4oz. cage feeders to try with pack bait, but haven't had a chance to try them yet. If you fish with PVA or pack baits they might not be the best option. They hold their own in terms of fighting fish, just can't cast the bulkier baits. Because of that I might be looking at different options for my main carp rigs.

One rod I'm looking at is the Nash Pursuit. They make a 7'-3lb test curve that is two piece. General rule is 1oz of lead for every pound of test curve. They are $113.00 at Big Carp Tackle.

Thank you sir! I ve been pondering about this for the past week, your answer was extremely helpful!!
 
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