Carp in cooler water

Discussion in 'Carp Fishing' started by skeetermagnet, Oct 13, 2006.

  1. skeetermagnet

    skeetermagnet New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    I must admit I'm fairly new to catching carp on purpose. I've fished enough that I've caught them accidentally several times. But I've been lurking and studying quite a bit. I live in central Oklahoma where the water gets pretty stinkin warm in the summer and cools down quite a bit in the winter. From what I understand, the carp slow down when the water cools off.

    What changes do I need to make for fall and winter fishing? Do the same baits work? Should I just hang it up during the winter?

    Thanks...
     
  2. tomcat85

    tomcat85 New Member

    Messages:
    966
    State:
    uh
    good questions i was wondering the same thing.
     

  3. villaitefla

    villaitefla New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    Florida
    Carp continue to feed during the winter, despite what you might read. One thing to consider is that they don't eat anywhere near as much as they do in the warmer months. Usually this time of year they will go on a feeding binge to put a few pounds of fat on to get them thru the winter.
    October is one of my favourite months to go after carp. To successfully catch carp in the winter, restrict the amount of chum you throw in to a minimum, and scale down the bait size. For instance ...... in the summer during a typical 4-5hr session, I would put in 6lb of corn + 2-3lbs of breadcrumb all mixed up together. Fish 4-5 grains on a hair rig, using a 2 or 4 size hook. ..... in the winter I would throw in at the very most a tin of corn, usually less, and fish 1 grain on a hair, and a 10 or 12 hook. Always find the deeper parts of the water you fish, and stick at it. The satisfaction of taking a "summer" fish in the snow is well worth the wait.
    Good luck with those winter carp ....... now my "winter" carp are a different story in Orlando .... :smile2:
     
  4. skeetermagnet

    skeetermagnet New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    That is great info! I'll be trying it out this weekend a Texoma on the Oklahoma - Texas border. With any luck maybe I'll have some pics to post!

    :smile2: :smile2: :smile2:
     
  5. IrishO'Brady

    IrishO'Brady New Member

    Messages:
    367
    State:
    Ga
    good luck with it brother- let me know how that works, sounds like a solid strategy to me.:big_smile:
     
  6. villaitefla

    villaitefla New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    Florida
    Good luck with the carp fishing ..... I'm sure all of us carpers will be interested to see how you get on.
    I'm about to embark on my winter addiction to catching the grass carp from the local town lakes. I miss 'my' commons and mirrors, but at the end of the day they are all fun to catch, and despite what people might say, they can be frustrating to hook sometimes !!!!!
     
  7. skeetermagnet

    skeetermagnet New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    I caught a grass carp out of a golf course pond in Missouri. I wasn't even trying. My brother-in-law and I were fishing with worms catching bass and perch and the occassional little channel cat. I cast up by some lily pads that I had seen moving. After a few minutes, the lily pads actually parted and came back together just like something big had gone through them. My bobber swam off and submerged slowly like a submarine diving. I set the hook on an enourmous grass carp. I played it for 5 or 10 minutes and finally was able to just pull it up on the bank. Until then, I hadn't even seen it. It was huge, probably 30" long. We just stood there with that :eek:oooh: look on our face. Just about then it shook one more time and shook free of the wire hook that it had straightened out.
    I'd love to be able to do that again on purpose.
     
  8. skeetermagnet

    skeetermagnet New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Edmond, Oklahoma
    Well, we spent the weekend at Texoma. The good news is in the past 10 days they have had enough rain to bring the lake up by 4ft, with 2ft more still coming down the Red River. The bad news is that the water was so red from the river, there wasn't anybody on our end of the lake catching anything. That water was so thick you could have measured it's viscosity like motor oil. We tried and watched a lot of other folks trying but no good.

    Oh well, if it was too easy everyone would be doing it. I did get in some good practice tying hair rigs. And we saw a bald eagle flying over the lake. Pretty cool.
     
  9. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    I just discovered the Hair rig as well as the Hair & bolt rig, I havn't tried them yet but looking forward to it. Sounds like you had a good time on that lake desoite getting skunked! Thanks for the great info too.

    Here is something I would like to shar with you on that rig.
    www.carpecarpio.com/carptips.html
     
  10. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,244
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    I see guys fishing for them all year round. I bowfish them and they are in the shallows at night all the time just like summer time.
     
  11. villaitefla

    villaitefla New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    Florida
    Take a close look at that bolt rig ..... there is a special connection that holds the lead to the line. It's called a breakaway. What that means is, if the line is snagged or broken the carp won't be left trailing a 2 or 3oz lead around with it. If a fixed lead gets trapped and the carp is tethered to it, it can't escape, and will die. The breakaway allows a carp to pull the line free of the lead, and thus escape.
    Buckeye Bob is a great carp angler, but anyone not familar with the set-up he's showing there, is going to miss the main point .... which is .....

    For all would be bolt-rig users ............
    Whatever you do ... DO NOT fish a bolt rig without the breakaway system.

    Thanks all ........ :smile2:
     
  12. ripley311

    ripley311 New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    COLORADO
    I tried the hair rig for the first time this weekend. It worked pretty good. I started using a 3oz sinker and the bolt rig but i used lighter line on the sinker and it broke on a cast and the sinker went flying. later I caught a carp using a hair rig and a slip sinker. I used an extra long hair and a night crawler.
     
  13. villaitefla

    villaitefla New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    Florida
    For 99.9% of the time here in the US a slip sinker will do the job perfectly well when fishing for carp. The bolt rig was devised by carp anglers in the UK to try and catch shy biting carp .... Yes I know that sounds opposite to what you would think, but the whole premise of a carp sucking and blowing is that when doing so, and it feels the hook, the carp will bolt .... !! with a fixed lead (bolt rig) the carp basically hooks itself. With a shy biting carp on a slip sinker it feels the line pulling through the sinker first and in a blink of an eye spits out the bait. All clever stuff.
    Contrary to popular belief you don't have to fish a hair rig with a bolt rig.
    I even fish a hair using a float set-up. But however used, hairs are the way to go if you want to consistently catch carp. I use them for the catfish, and they work great too .... :smile2: even though a catfish doesn't suck and blow .... I think they just "chomp" ... :roll_eyes:
     
  14. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P
    I have seen carp caught on 32 degree weather in the month of February. Like Tony said, they don't need to eat as much so you don't have to chum as much as if you fished in the spring or summer. Also, i only use 1 kernel of canned corn on a hair rig.

    If you are in the the southern states, you don't have to worry about really cold water temps like we do in Philadelphia.