Carolina rig question

Discussion in 'Channel Catfish' started by yotetrapper, Mar 3, 2007.

  1. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
    I seen a illustration of one someone posted on here I see you got the weight, then a swivel with the hook off one part and a bobber/cork off the other. Is that right? what kind and size of bobber/cork are we talking here? Little confused. I'm guessing small so dont lift weight off bottom right... also, what are the line lengths from swivel to hook and swivel to bobber?

    Ang
     
  2. riverdawg-1

    riverdawg-1 New Member

    Messages:
    738
    State:
    salem, va
    Basic carolina rig is a sliding weight-egg sinker or no roll sinker-on the main line, then a bead, then tie on a barrell swivel. To that tie on a leader-12-18 inches- and tie your hook to that and your ready to go. Welcome to the BOC.
     

  3. BigCatDreaming

    BigCatDreaming New Member

    Messages:
    263
    State:
    Illinois
    Yeah chips right on the carolina rig setup. I'm not so sure what you mean by the bobber setup. Where in Illinois are you from? Its good to know we have another member from the prarie state
     
  4. Sparky Larson

    Sparky Larson New Member

    Messages:
    539
    State:
    Marlette Michigan
    Angela,
    Thats the way we do it here in Michigan!
    Sparky
     
  5. Bigun

    Bigun New Member

    Messages:
    234
    State:
    Burnet, TX
    There are times that I add a float and a bobberstop above the egg sinker on a Carolina rig. This is used to stay above hydrilla or other bottom brush. The float has to be matched to the weight. The bobber stop is set to the desired depth. This allows the float and sinker to slide down to the swivel and allow the rig to be cast. Once it hits the water the sinker pulls the line through the float until it rests aganist the bobber stop. Another way is to add a small panfish float to the leader 6" or so from the hook. This will float the bait slightly off the bottom.
     
  6. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
    What Bigun said is the picture I saw here. It was a line like this.... sinker, bead, 3 way swivel, leader with hook from bottom of swivel and leader with bobber from side of 3 way swivel. When I saw that picture labelled "carolina rig" and then read that everyone here just about used carolina rigs, I thought that ya'll were using the bobber. Now I see your not. I'd never even heard of using a small bobber on a tight line like that but now I see where it could come in handy. I guess I'm basically looking for the smallest bobber I can find. Thanks
     
  7. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
  8. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    You can also use a small float on your leader in a Texas ( three way) rig or a Carolina rig to keep your bait slightly up off the bottom out of the mud or debris to spread the sent around.
     
  9. Flintman

    Flintman New Member

    Messages:
    710
    State:
    OKC, OKLA.
    Angela, if you have not visited the library yet, go to the top on the page, click library and you will gain more knowledge than reading 10 years of an outdoor magizine.
    Your knowledge of catfishing and rods, reels, boats, ect..ect... will be unlimited.
     
  10. SkiMax

    SkiMax Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    another thing a float does is make a live bait more active. They will fight against the pull upwards from the float. making them irresistable to big flatheads!
     
  11. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    The rig I use has a "snake weight" or "worm weight" attached to a the snap on a snap-swivel. Main line is tied to the the swivel with the 18"-24" leader on the other end of the swivel. The leader has a 2" cigar float about one foot from the swivel, then the hook. The float can be moved to adjust the height off the bottom.

    I use these for trolling/drifting. The snap allows you to change weights for depth and drift speed and also for anchoring.
     
  12. lilrivercatman

    lilrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    Iowa
    Why do you need a swivel? I've always just went, Barrel Sinker, Splitshot, hook. Please explain
     
  13. Crazy_Cooter

    Crazy_Cooter New Member

    Messages:
    27
    State:
    Kentucky
    I use a swivel cause catfish like to twist and roll after they are hooked. The swivel helps prevent tangles if you are fishing in water with any current. Also, sometimes a split shot will slide down the mainline causing the slip sinker to butt up against the hook. Splitshot also can weaken the line strength and not only break your line, but also your heart when a big fish is on the line.
     
  14. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    First, baits have a tendency to spin as they pass through the water. This can lead to twisted line. The swivel eliminates that.

    Second, it allows for a good knot point.

    Lastly, like cooter said, some cats tend to roll and spin as they get close to the boat. The swivel helps to eminate and tension on the knots from the rolling.
     
  15. UncleD

    UncleD New Member

    Messages:
    11
    State:
    Lafayette, Loui
    I purely burns me that I don't have enough posts to view the pictures everyone posts.!!
     
  16. Bacardipr05

    Bacardipr05 New Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    I agree the swivel is needed as catfish tend to roll alot. I however use a split shot tied about 12 inches from the weight. The idea behind it is when the egg sinker hits the split shot it will act as a stop and the weight will help hook the fish.