Carcano Ammo

Discussion in 'Guns - Blackpowder' started by Mosin, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. Mosin

    Mosin New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Missouri
    I bought a carcano carbine a few months ago and the guy threw in a box of hornadys. Every one sticks in the chamber. I also tried a few Norma rounds a buddy gave me, and the worked perfect. The only difference is the norma rim is thicker. Has any one else had this problem? Is my extractor maybe to worn to pick up the smaller rim? Mil Surp guns ussally arent this ammo picky.
     
  2. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    Older military guns are FAR from the cartridge pressure standards that are used today. The Newer ammo may be to high of a pressure for the gun which can lead to BAD BAD things including death to the person shooting it IF the action ruptures.
    Look at the primer and look at the cases for any signs of bulging of the primer REALLY flat, it should have rounded edges. Any of these signs point to a chamber pressure that is WAY to high.
     

  3. etexun

    etexun New Member

    Messages:
    375
    State:
    Texas (Nea
    Got rid of mine. I never liked the Italian Carcano.
     
  4. restorerancientiron

    restorerancientiron New Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    State:
    Cadiz, KY
    I have a couple of 6.5 carcanos , the only time I had that trouble is when I was shooting some old corrosive primed military rounds.I would have to clean with a chamber brush every ten rounds or a case would start to stick.Norma is the best brass/ammo for sure.Is the extractor ripping the rim of the case?If it is isn't the problem is likely the thinner rim.if it is ripping a gash out of the rim, your chamber could be large and causing excessive pressure.Hopefully it is just the reloads , do you have a way to mike the outside diameter and compare.You can buy the kit to make a chamber casting from brownells or midway.I would have it checked out for sure as this could be dangerous.
     
  5. restorerancientiron

    restorerancientiron New Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    State:
    Cadiz, KY
    yeah not the best for sure but hands down better than a late model Japanese arisaka.
     
  6. Mosin

    Mosin New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Missouri
    Kip, not sure but arent itialian carcanos the only guns that shoot 6.5 carcano, you would think hornady would know this and make sure the pressure was not to high.

    It's not ripping the rims off, or leaving any marks.

    I guess this will be solved when I get enough norma brass and will probably load just the starting load as to not put to much pressure in the chamber of a 80 year old gun.
     
  7. restorerancientiron

    restorerancientiron New Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    State:
    Cadiz, KY
    You are good to go then if it is not tearing the case or the case is sticking in the chamber these two along with the flattened primers are signs of high pressure.My guess is it is simply what you thought all along simply a thinner rim.As far as I know the the carcano is the only rifle chambered for this round.Everybody gives this little gun a bad wrap but for a short barreled carbine that was introduced in 1891 its not had to bad of a life.:wink:
     
  8. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    Other than customs here yes, there are some gun makers in other countries that are still making them.

    One thing that I see by doing a little research is the bullet. Hornady is the ONLY maker to load a 160 grain bullet. With a longer bullet the chamber pressures can go higher. If you have any left color the tip of the bullet with a black Sharpe and put it into the chamber, close the bolt then open it back up and see if the bullet is touching the rifling in the barrel. If it is that will cause the pressure to spike in the chamber and that can cause the problem.

    One thing about ANY military rifles is they were made in a mass production factory. While some are very good others are not. Chamber dimensions can make a HUGE difference in the operation of a gun and the reamers were not always changed as often as they should have. A Large or small chamber will cause some pretty bad problems.
    Look around the case mouth of one of the cases you shot and see if it shows signs that hot gasses went back into the chamber. This can happen sometimes with a larger than normal chamber and newer (Harder) brass.

    A friend is into WW2 weapons and he has a few that we had to have dies cut for the chamber to be able to reload for them as he did not want to alter the gun. Also the ammo tolerance was different and it would depend on which side of the accepted amount the Hornady ammo was made to as the newer ammo is made to MUCH tighter tolerances.
    One interesting note is even in his guns the Norma ammo shoots fine and S&B is the second best followed by imported ammo with only a few issues but modern factory loads were constant headaches.
     
  9. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Kip has his game on,He is giving you the straight dope on high pressures.
     
  10. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    I learned the tough way on some of it. I have a 25/06 Sendero that would more than likely blow up before showing high pressures and it was odd how I found it. The chamber is on the small side of the tolerance margin. I bought Winchester, Federal and Remington ammo when i bought the gun. I went to the range and it would not even chamber a single one of the Federal cartridges. After checking and measuring I found the ammo was on the larger side of the margin and it was in fact larger than the chamber in my gun. I had to have dies cut for it also but I can get WELL above standard loads before it starts to flatten the primer. I backed off some and found a load it loves though!