Canoe'rs I need info

Discussion in 'Kayaker and Canoe Fishing' started by Scott Daw, Nov 26, 2006.

  1. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    Hey y'all. Im getting a canoe between my christmas bonus at work and gift certificates for cabelas,Im getting for christmas. I need to know what necessities I need to get for the average outting besides my paddle & PFD.
     
  2. dademoss

    dademoss New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Ohio
    Something to bail water, a small anchor,a 2nd paddle tied into the boat, a drybox or waterproof envelope for the registration papers and a flotation cushion to either throw or sit on.
     

  3. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    The beer cooler:tounge_out:
    Paddling makes me thirsty.
     
  4. squirtspop

    squirtspop New Member

    Messages:
    968
    State:
    Glencoe, Arkansas
    Tie the cooler in. If you happen to capsize you sure don't want to lose that beer.

    A length of long floating rope tied on the canoe is handy too just in case you do capsize. You don't want to lose the canoe.
     
  5. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Put a bungee around that beer cooler to hold the lid down. Tying it down won't do any good if the lid comes open. Make sure you wear that flotation device. It won't do any good if you flip in deep water and don't have it on. I've been paddling canoes and kayaks for over 30 years and won't get in even shallow water with out my life vest on, and I've only flipped once. Good thing I had the vest on, it was in 12 ft of water 100 ft from shore, but it was my fault, did something stupid to cause the flip.

    If you are not familiar with canoes, get a book on canoe paddling. The Boy Scouts have a decent little merit badge book, cheap, simple, and good advice. Keep to the shallow water until you've figured out how to handle the canoe. Allow no one in the canoe without a life vest.

    What kind/size canoe are you getting? That makes a difference too. Some canoes are more tipsy than others. I second the advice about the extra paddle secured to the thwart. BTW, if you do flip, canoes are next to impossibe to get back into. But, I like canoes, still have one, along with my favorite fishing vessel, a kayak (actually, two).
     
  6. bigredsbbq

    bigredsbbq New Member

    Messages:
    293
    State:
    Illinois
    I had one I made a bracket on the back out of angle iron and wood and put a trolling motor on it it was sweet I put the battery up front to help with weight cause i was almost always bymyself but it was fun I used it on the lake here it got me out on the waterbut then I had to get a real boat
     
  7. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Tylenol or Ibuprophen, and a big tube a Ben Gay...Just an ole guy talking.
    :smile2:
     
  8. mspratt

    mspratt New Member

    Messages:
    173
    State:
    missouri
    I'm not a canoer any more,just to hard on the back.But if u want to read a book about a canoe trip,read----Paddle to the Amazon----- by Don Starkell.The best modern adventure story I have ever read.:wink:
     
  9. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    At least one 5 gallon buckey with lid for dry storage it also floats if you flip over.
     
  10. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I think it was 1981 I went on a canoe oriented survival trip.
    I was a member of the Raleigh/Wake Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol.
    We canoed from Poole Rd. in Raleigh to the ocean via the Neuse river. ( A long way)

    (Do this first) Most that went didnt have alot of forethought or knowledge of boating . I went to a canoe shop and got fitted for a paddle as did the other 3 country boys that were in the squadron. It paid off dropping 30 bucks on a paddle. That was alot of money for a aluminum shafted paddle in 1981 for a teenager.

    We took the canoe classes where we would go out in the middle of a lake and flip them , then right them in water over our heads and get back onboard.
    I dont remember how to do this anymore:big_smile: but it was fun.

    6 days out of the 7 days prior to our shove off it rained ALOT. If you have ever been to the Cliffs of the Neuse state park it was closed due to flooding.
    For safety in high water we threw a 2x4 across the beam of two canoes and lashed them side by side. Only one solo canoe was used for a scout canoe which wound up getting sucked under a log jam and thrown out the other side. Thank God 2 cases of Vietnam era c-rats were a casualty. Unfortunately we lost or sideband radio and a 2 way we had.
    The Colonel said it was smoke signals from here on out and we had just started the trip 3 hours earlier. But we had our corporate Cessna 172 provided by congress that would make a flyby on us daily.

    If you have ever been to the park at Smithfield that is where we camped the first night, in the parking lot. If you have been here you've seen the street light closest to the boatramp and a fire hydrant. The hydrant wasnt visible and the street light was 20 feet from the bank. There wasn't a boatramp atleast not one visible.

    What a trip that one turned out to be. Back then there were rock dams in the river. The water was high enough we could have probally traversed them but we would pull out to avoid ripping a bottom open like a can opener got hold of it. We spent days unloading climbing steep muddy rain soaked banks, hauling the canoes 300-500 yards downstream and back down a muddy bank or canoeing through the woods looking for a way around massive log jams.

    Thunderstorms would come up in the evening and I spent several nights lodged up under someone's back porch or deck on their empty vacation house. Soaking wet and it gets cold in the summertime about 2 hours before sunrise:eek:oooh:
    It was indeed a survival trip and survival for the fit. In the end we paddled our canoes sans gear out into the breakers at the Cape Hatteras lighthouse flipped them over and washed them out. That was a celebration. That night we were camped in a backwoods campground on the outerbanks eating pizza. The next morning I woke up and the first thing I saw through the misquito netting was ducks swimming by the tent. I had slept in a good 3 inches of water from the flashflood that occured overnight. I was too tired to care.

    One day I would love to do it again under different terms like water that wasn't well beyond flood stage.
    28 of us made this trip including A retired Airforce full bird Colonel that flew combat missions in 3 wars and a retired Captain.
    Memories I'll never forget with a canoe.
     
  11. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    Mark that was a good story. I have done, in my younger years, a few 50 miles trips down the Brazos. In large groups and with one friend but never faced much like that.
     
  12. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    A Canoe will give you many fishing opportunities other boats can't give you.
    ~ I fish from my canoe quite extensively with my family. I own a Guide series Old Town canoe and one thing I bought I can't live without is my stabilizer.. With it I can put my feet in the water, fish standing up and most importantly, bring along my 4 year old, my wife, and my dog.. Not to mention all the gear and coolers..

    * If you fish with other people in the boat and you don't want to tip I recommend checking these out..

    * I got mine from Spring Creek outfitters.
    http://www.canoegear.com/html/
     
  13. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    Here is a picture of my daughter and I fishing in our canoe rig..

    The stabilizer sponsons will give you a piece of mind.
    A~
     

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  14. cnwamw

    cnwamw New Member

    Messages:
    230
    State:
    texas

    i bought a set of stabilers from cabela's and they are awesome.i highky recommend geting them. make the canoe rock soild
     
  15. riverratmatt

    riverratmatt New Member

    Messages:
    52
    State:
    ky, totz
    i keep some fire staring matrials like lighter fuild taped under a seat so if its cold and you flip youll have somthing that that will burn when yu light it. as forr bailing half of a 16oz coke botttle does great it canforms to the boat bottom
     
  16. Moon Cat

    Moon Cat New Member

    Messages:
    70
    State:
    Upper Marlboro, Maryland
    Beer drinking is fine by me in a canoe. The only problem is taking a leak, You might end up taking a bath at the same time. Get the stabilizers I never had them. they sound like a good idea. I took the unexpected bath one time I lost my balance and jumped in instead of tipping the canoe. My tackle box was laying wide open in the boat didnt want to lose that.
     
  17. plainsman

    plainsman New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,187
    State:
    minnesota
    thats quite a story Mark, ahh, how great it was to be young and adventurous, not knowing the trials, but being able to endure them, and knowing it was good, but not something want to do again, Ive only canoed around small lakes, and rivers, but it was fun anyway, not sure I'd like doin it in a flood, and puttin up with all the stuff anymore, thanks for the story
     
  18. Barry Nelson

    Barry Nelson New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    Tennessee
    I grew up canoing, always loved it...still do.
     
  19. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Good advice on the beer.If you are going to drink or be careless in a boat,a canoe or yak is the best one to do it in.You are mostly a major danger to yourself and your passengers in the canoe and not near the danger to everyone else like drinking or careless in a power boat.Strictly experience.I am not against beer,but prefer the beer and Old Crow and RC Cola at the end of a day.Not during it.I am against the abuse and misuse of all drugs.I stood and poled my 17 ft.Grumman White Water many miles in the Okefenokee swamp when cleaning the canoe trails.It is not a great "self tracker" when paddling with a slightly rounded keel that will slip a rock,but extremely strong and has the strength for walking across a log.Doing this will destroy many canoes.It did be heavy.I believe it was 117 lbs.The aluminum is great for storing outside for years with no affects from the sun. I believe in paddling or putting in upstream of my take out place when ever possible.Just remember.There are some folk that will suddenly stand in a boat,lean and reach out 6 foot for something just like they do when they are shopping the top shelf at Wal-Mart.These few will not give up this spontaneous reaction to anything that attracts their attention no matter how many times they flip you.You have to learn to say"no you ain't coming" to them.I have lost hundreds of dollars worth of gear to several such.The second and third times they did it was my fault for taking them again.Great folk on dry land.Also great folk to "play roll your boat over in the water"with.Just plan on getting wet all of the time and then it will not be a problem when it does happen,because it most likely will sooner or later with any boat if you use it enough.Please let us know how it works out for you.I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  20. Barry Nelson

    Barry Nelson New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    Tennessee
    I keep reading that you'll get wet....lol...you may at first, but we used to use a canoe to run a trap line and coon hunt as well ,when I was young, flipping wasnt an option.

    I havent flipped a canoe in 30 years. Learn its tendencies , proper loading and stay in recommended weights and you'll be fine.

    A wide beam river canoe is the best choice,high bow (some call it indian style) get one with a keel. It wont respond as well to a sharp J stroke, but most folks wont be able to tell the difference.

    when traveling alone on a river with occasional big boat traffic, load gear center, paddle from rear. If you keep the bow light it'll take waves better (hit em at a slight angle)

    I know some people may or may not agree with my advice, but ive owned around 20 canoes of different types and lengths .

    as already stated, a fitted paddle is an excellent choice.

    last of all, if you choose to run a motor, get a canoe designed for that,(squared transom). add on side motor mounts decrease stability.