Canoe or Kayak

Discussion in 'Kayaker and Canoe Fishing' started by SNAGGED, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. SNAGGED

    SNAGGED New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    Hello everyone. New to the BOC. Really enjoy it.
    Whats better to fish solo out of. A canoe or kayak?
     
  2. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    That question isn't easily answered.
    There is all kinds of canoes and thousands of different kinds of Kayaks including those that the only way to own one is to build it yourself.

    Last year I sat down and wrote out the specifications I wanted for a boat to fish the upper Neuse river. I dont intend on fishing out of the boat but rather use it to scout out spots and get to spots like sand bars in about 15 miles of river where boating is pretty much limited to a canoe or yak.

    I emailed them to a fella I met that designs and builds canoes and yaks.
    He designed me a canoe that met and exceeded what I wanted.
    I got free plans and a license to build two boats off the one plan provided I provide pictures of the build, he got another set of plans to market for sale.
    I haven't got around to the project yet but its a 2 sheet canoe. 2 sheets of Okoume marine plywood will build it with a total weight of less then 40 pounds. It's called the ENO Named after the Enoe river that turns into the Neuse river.

    What I'm saying is every canoe isn't alike and every yak isnt either.
    Some are for the very experienced and some are for the more timid just getting their toes wet with paddling.
    If you arent experienced you wouldnt probally want to get into a sport yak or even a touring yak. Same applies for a canoe. If you go the canoe or yak route buy from a store or builder that specializes in them to get you fitted with what you want and need for your experience level.
    We currently have a member that yaks out into the ocean fishing for king mackeral and such. He is a fellow Tarheeler.
     

  3. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    welcome to the boc , ryan . that question would be hard for me to answer iv never fished out of either , but would rather have something i could stand up and fight in . i have a 16' 6' beam river jon i like the stability
     
  4. SNAGGED

    SNAGGED New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    I Was Leaning Toward A Kayak. Lighter Rigs Float In Less Water Right? The River I Fish Turns Shallow Every Now And Then. Also Whats Easier To Paddle And Manuever? Thank You
     
  5. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    A lot depends on how you fish. I use kayaks mostly, but fish mainly lakes and slow rivers/creeks. However, once and a while, I go up and fish a river that has long runs, then shallow areas through which the boat must be dragged. On our last trip, we did an extended trip 5 miles down river, camped out, and then paddled back to where we put in. The kayaks were loaded to the gills. What we had in 3 kayaks could easily have fit into my 17 foot canoe. However, the way we fish the river is to paddle to a big gravel bar that borders a long, deep run, set up camp, and fish from the bank.

    For fishing from the boat, a kayak works well. Its easy to maneuver and doesn't catch as much wind. On a lake, it is a great fishing craft. It works well in the river, but capacity for gear may be limited. My preference for fishing is the kayak, though the canoe is fine also. Mainly, its handling in the wind and maneuverability that gives the kayak the edge.

    But, saying which is better for fishing is not that simple. There are many types of canoes and kayaks. The best fishing canoes tend to be wider and have a flatter bottom, though not too flat as that compromises ease of paddling and stability if you lean over. One of the best commercial canoes forsolo fishing is the Old Town Pack canoe. Its short, light, and , and wide. Its a very stable canoe. But, for paddling, there are others that are better and still good fishing craft. To a point, a longer canoe or kayak will be faster and track straighter. But, longer canoes aren't as good if soloing. Most canoe companies have canoe models that the either label fishing canoes, or state that the are good for that purpose. It pays to go on-line and read the blurbs for the products.

    Kayaks basically break down into two types, sit insides, and sit on top. Many fisherman prefert the sit on top models. The are easy to get in and out of and you have room to move around them. For the bay, for instance, they may be the best fishing kayak. Then, there are the sit-insides., Those are the conventional kayaks with a cockpit you sit inside the hull similar to a canoe, except you sit closer to midship and on a seat that is basically on the floor of the hull. These are good river boats, work well on a lake, and are better for fishing when its cold, you stay drier. Sit insides are more difficult ot get in and out of. Unlike a sit on top, if you flip over, its not easy to get back in a sit-inside. With a sit on top, its morel like pulling your self up on a raft. Sit insides will hold water and you must get rid of some of the water before paddling.

    Both types of kayaks are safe if used properly. In two years, the only time I've turned over is when i did something on purpose that I knew had the potential to cause me to flip. No matter which you chose if a kayak, its best to get one in the 12 foot to 15 foot range.. Probably, with the rivers you say you want to fish, the shorter one will be beat as they are easy to move in and out of tight spots.

    For me, the kayak works best. I love it and its my first choice when I go to pick out which boat I want to use, kayak or canoe. Both are good fishing craft, but only you, in the end, can decide which best suits your needs. Do some research, Google kayak fishing, also canoe fishing and see what you get. Visit some of the sites, register, and aslk questions. Once you decide kayak or canoe, visit dealers and see if you can test paddle the boat you want to paddle. In many cases, you may have to rent the craft for the day, but its money well spent and many dealers will subtract the rental fee from the price of the boat.
     
  6. SNAGGED

    SNAGGED New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    Now that I have chosen a kayak, what do I really need? 2 pole, 4 pole, how much room outside of my 215 lbs body? fish in or fish on top? slow river and resevoir is the water. Catfish, sand bass, crappie, and bluegill are the game. Appreciate any feedback. Go K-STATE WILDCATS
     
  7. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    I'm not sure what you mean by poles. If by poles, you mean paddles, you need a double bladed kayak paddle. They come in lots of flavors and prices and that can be confusing. Basically, you want a two piece paddle...easier to stow when transporting the kayak. An aluminum shaft paddle with plastic blades will do just fine for learning, though if you want, you can spend hundreds of dollars on a paddle. Two inexpensive aluminum shaft paddles that are fairly light weight are the Carlisle Day Tripper and the Sea Sense paddle. Both can be fournd in the $25-45 range.

    I assume by fish in and fish on, you mean sit inside or sit on top. Either works fine for the type of fishing you plan to do. The sit inside has the advantage of being drier, so may be better in cooler weather. The sit on top is seen by many as being more versatile for fishing, but those of us who use sit insides are mostly happy with them.

    At your size, about the same as me, I suggest you look at kayaks that have at least a 350 lb capacity...you can fudge a bit on that, but not much. The capacity of a kayak is the weight of the kayak, you, and your gear. Without knowing what you would like to spend on a kayak, its difficult to suggest what to look at. In the under $500 range, the Mainstream Kingfisher is a good beginner kayak. Its not the best paddling kayak, but its stable and a good fishing platform. Its a sit on top. The Kingfisher will get you out on the water and get your fishing. But, you may want another kayak later . Heritage makes a good sit inside kayak for fishing. Think its called the Fisherman, the 12 foot model woud be my preference, though the 9.5 footer is an decent fishing kayak. After that, its wide open. The price range you are looking at is needed to assist any in that area.

    If I had $1000 to spend on a new kayak and gear, I would look at the Hobie
    Quest. Its a great kayak and comes with paddle, seat (that's sometimes and extra cost for sit on top kayaks. Also a cart that will help you get the kayak to places you can put out that may not have a launch site or are remote...say a half miile walk.

    The Quest is a sit on top. Its laid out well for fishing. Liquid Logic makes the Manta Ray 12 and 14 (numbers indicate length) . Either is a good fishing kayak, the 14 is roomier and a bit faster. Price in October was $775 at my dealer and it comes with a seat, no paddle.

    Ocean Kayak builds the Prowler models. The Prowler 13 is a good fishing kayak. They build a couple of other models also good for fishing. Wilderness Systems has the Tapon series...120, 140, and 160. All are good kayaks, though as you go up in length, the pice goes up. Wilderness has come out with a new version of the Kayak called the Ride...great kayak for catfishing. Also, the new Perception Search looks good too. Heritage builds the Redfish, a very good sit on top kayak.

    It goes on and on , those are just a few. No matter which you choose, the most important accessory you can get is a good life jacket. Buy one and wear it like religion. If you have questions, just send me a message.
     
  8. SNAGGED

    SNAGGED New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    By poles, I meant pole holders. Around 700$ is what I want to spend. Bass Pro has one in their spring classic 06 catalog. Forget the name of it but when I get it and the price I will fill you in
     
  9. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Bass Pro sells the Ocean Kayak Prowler 13 for around $775. Its a great fishing kayak. Think it comes with 2 rod holders built in. The rod holders are attached inside the kayak. They the rods will face the rear of the kayak at an angle. Its good for carrying the rods and trolling, but I don't like that for catfishing. The best rod holders for a kayak are from Scotty. But, if you'll message me when you get the kayak, I'll help anyway I can and suggest some places on the web you can go to get more information on rigging a kayak. Because those sites have fishing forums, BOC won't allow posting them in the thread.
     
  10. YeeHaw

    YeeHaw New Member

    Messages:
    446
    State:
    Quincy Illinois
    Welcome to the BOC, I like a canoe more because it has more room, but that's just my opinion. Maybe try out both for yourself and see.
     
  11. SNAGGED

    SNAGGED New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    What are scupper stoppers?
     
  12. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Scupper stoppers are plugs you put into the holes, called supper holes, that are in the floor of sit on top kayaks. Sit on tops are double hulled, designed to take water over the sides from a wave, and the water drains out the scupper holes. The plugs are good to have when fishing in the winter, they'll help you keep dry. If you are looking at the Prowler and will be fishing from it in the winter, get them. Actually, for lake and river fishing, the stoppers can be left in all the time, though you cannot fish a kayak or canoe without getting some water in it and the open scupper holes allows that to drainl