Cajun Red which one?

Discussion in 'Fishing Line Review' started by PaJay-p, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. PaJay-p

    PaJay-p Guest

    I want to try Cajun Red but I see there are at least 3 different types. Which is best for catfishing?
     
  2. dinger66

    dinger66 New Member

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    899
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    north alabama
    it just depends on the weight line you want to use
     

  3. catfishbill33

    catfishbill33 New Member

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    356
    State:
    Clarksville, TN
    Jay ,
    yesterday my wife and me were fishing and were useing skipjack for bait.
    We use the red line 20# test.We tied into a fish we thought was a "rock" its a hybrid of the stripper.We both gave it all we could to land it but it tore loose.Neither line broke which I was surprised.

    At the end of the day I was still using skipjack scraps just what I could find.The last time throwing out There was one that tied into it and it was at least 20-25#flat head if you have ever caught one you know what a fight they put up.I landed it by using a little experience.The Red line have served me well.
     
  4. motard1

    motard1 New Member

    Messages:
    669
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    TEXAS
    None of them. In my opinion,they all suck. I use ande,berkley big game,and power pro braid. I tried the cajun red,but it develops too much memory.
     
  5. bw69r

    bw69r Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,816
    State:
    West Newton, PA
    Jay you need to get the cajun red lightning. it has the least amount of memory compared to the others. used it in 20# test and had no problems with memory at all. caught my 25.8 pound flat on it and it worked great. it is very strong line and can't beat the price.
     
  6. john catfish young

    john catfish young New Member

    Messages:
    3,070
    State:
    Kentucky
    If you decide to use Cajun Red......I use the Cajun (Red Lightening) in 20# test. It is still made in the USA and the other types are now made else where. It does come very stiff and lots of memory. This is what I do to help with the stiffness. After I spool it on my reels....I take and cast out several times with a 4 or 5 oz. sinker as far as I can. This helps the lines stiffness greatly. I have found it to be some of the toughest line out there. Having caught Flatheads up to 67.2 lbs and haven't broke the line yet!!! I use this line on all my big reels. No problems at all and for the price......well you decide!!!!!!:cool2:
     
  7. mankind

    mankind New Member

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    1,627
    State:
    ashland ky
    theirs a lot of good lines out their,its more of what has worked for you in the past i have tried differnt lines but have always came back to big game.:wink:
     
  8. motard1

    motard1 New Member

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    669
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    TEXAS
    Hopefully if you are using the cajun red it's not because of the color. In the October issue of field and stream,they tell why the red color is a scam. Thats with line as well as hooks,bleeding crankbaits,and other tackle. Very interesting article if you get a chance to read it. BTW,it's on page 24
     
  9. motard1

    motard1 New Member

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    669
    State:
    TEXAS
  10. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

    Messages:
    1,602
    State:
    Texas
  11. motard1

    motard1 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    TEXAS
    If you ever go diving,you will see what he is referring to. It leaves a definite line in the water,like braided line.
     
  12. motard1

    motard1 New Member

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    669
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    TEXAS
    The color red has become the hottest thing in fishing tackle over the past few years. From red line to red-splashed lures, it seems as if every angler is somehow buying the trend. But I happen to think the whole red thing is the biggest bunch of BS in all of fishing.
    Cajun Line helped start things a few years ago by marketing a translucent-red monofilament they still claim to be “virtually invisible” underwater. That’s allegedly because colors are filtered out by water as depth increases. The color red is the first to disappear. But even though the color disappears, the line does not; it turns gray.
    If you’ve ever watched one of the many films of a shark feeding frenzy, you’ll have noticed how red blood appears to be black in the blue-green depths. By Cajun’s account of red’s “virtual invisibility,” that red blood should be invisible, but it’s not. While the color itself is gone, its tone or value remains.
    Red splotches on lures and red hooks, meanwhile, are more ways in which we as anglers are being played for suckers. Supposedly, these simulate a blood trail or wounded baitfish. But do you really think a bass looks at red dots on a Rat-L-Trap lure and thinks to itself, “Ah-ha! That must be an injured shad. Better eat that one right now!” I don’t believe it.
    Speaking as a fisherman, I do happen to like the way red looks on certain lures. But to paraphrase Clark Gable’s classic line in Gone With The Wind: Frankly, my dear, the fish don’t give a damn.
    What he said "He thinks" about was that he thinks it's all bs.
     
  13. PaJay-p

    PaJay-p Guest

    Thanks Motard you talked me out of Cajun Red. I'll stick to BBG and Power Pro.:wink:
     
  14. motard1

    motard1 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    TEXAS
    Don't let me talk ypu out of it. I just hate it. Not because of the color,just the memory it develops.