Bridling Flathead Baits

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by Brian Moyse, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. Brian Moyse

    Brian Moyse New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    Rockton, IL
    My dad lives down in Florida and fishes for sailfish quite a bit. I noticed when I am down there fishing they bridle all of their live baits with a circle hook. He mentioned they get a better percentage of hook ups with bridle baits, and with the circle hooks all of the sails are hooked in the corner of the mouth. Anyone ever try this with flathead baits? Curious if this would improve hookup percentages with them?

    Brian
     
  2. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    Not sure how to bridle a bait, if it gives a chance for better hook up then its worth a try. There is a lot to be learned from the saltwater fisherman about rigs and ways to present bait.
     

  3. zeboman

    zeboman New Member

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    2,883
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    I don`t know what it is either but if you know a different method of fishing give it a try,let us know how it works for you.
     
  4. Brian Moyse

    Brian Moyse New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    Rockton, IL
  5. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Funny you should bring this up. I have wondered the very same thing, but never got around to trying it. I feel like I get a pretty darn good hookup percentage with my kahle hooks nose-hooking sunfish and white perch for baits, so I haven't gone to the trouble.

    For those that haven't seen it, when bridleing a bait, a needle is carefully passed through the eye sockets and either some string or a rubber band is pulled through. The rubber band or string is then used to tie the hook so it rides right on top of the bait's head. Somebody else might be able to describe it better or even come up with a picture.
     
  6. Brian Moyse

    Brian Moyse New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    Rockton, IL
    I have even seen that you can use an electrical zip tie to do this as well. You cut the zip tie on a 45 degree angle so that it leaves a sharp edge. You then pass the zip tie through the bait above the head in front of the dorsal fin. Start tightening the zip tie, pass the hook under the zip tie and then tighten completely. The hook will stay on top of the bait in an upright position.
     
  7. firechief4201

    firechief4201 New Member

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    1,055
    State:
    Catlettsburg, Kentucky
    I think I will try it on a gill.
     
  8. SSgt Fishslayer

    SSgt Fishslayer New Member

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    1,241
    State:
    south carolina
    thats a pretty good idea. i think it might work pretty good. do you think you could do the same thing with a zip tie if you put it around the base of his tail?
     
  9. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    I have pics at home (im at work) on how to bridle. I wanted to try it on small gills for stripers & muskie this year now that I have a Kat bobber.
     
  10. catfisherman_eky3

    catfisherman_eky3 New Member

    Messages:
    2,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    i have caught alot more fish personally with circle hooks
     
  11. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    i didn't know what that was called, but i have done it using shad. i saw how to do it on tv for tarpon. being short of tarpon in the tx panahndle, i tried it on blue cats. used the head of a 12 inch shad and caught fish fine, but no better than i did hooking them through the nose, so i quit doing it. i used a needle and thread to do it, but i haven't tried it on livebait yet.
     
  12. Wolfdog

    Wolfdog New Member

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    181
    State:
    Iowa
    Looks like something to try . Bet the live bait stays live longer if you do it right.
     
  13. jagdoctor1

    jagdoctor1 New Member

    Messages:
    708
    State:
    CA/AZ
    It looks like a way to put a bigger hook in a smaller bait. I prefer to just adjust the hook to the size of the bait. Though you never know when a 40 pd flat will hit your 3 inch shiner... I don't think I care to do the extra work but I can see how many people would like it.
     
  14. Brian Moyse

    Brian Moyse New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    Rockton, IL
    Sure, you could use the zip tie on the tail of a bait. Some of the live bait fishermen in saltwater will use two hooks on the bait. You can bridle the bait, and then place a second hook near the tail. They place the hook with a zip strip around the tail. Probably good with shad so that you don't have to place the hook through them. I would imagine they would live longer.

    It definately will keep the bait alive a bit longer and allow for more a nature presentation.

    You can actually use dental floss for the line. You can buy a big needle from a fabric store and just cut a little notch in the eye of the needle to make your own rigging needle.

    All my dad does is cut a piece of floss and tie the two ends together. Take the floss place it in the notch of the rigging needle. Push the rigging needle through the nostil of the bait. After the needle comes through do not pull the floss loop all the way through. You should have equally long ends of floss sticking out each side of the nostril. Bring the ends (loops), up together and pass the hook through both loops. Spin the bait around 3 or 4 times and then pass the hook through the loops again. The hook should be facing up. That's it. Takes less than a minute per bait.
     
  15. firechief4201

    firechief4201 New Member

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    1,055
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    Catlettsburg, Kentucky
    The more I read about this the more I like.:cool2:
     
  16. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

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    3,734
    State:
    Ohio

    Me too. I did a search and found four more ways. One even uses a small button. I think I will settle on the rubber band though.:big_smile:
     
  17. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Gathering from my experiences and what I have learned from certain guides, I have come to the conclusions that most of us don't know how to properly use a circle hook for maximum effectiveness.

    My thought processes have always been, hey it's a hook, how technical can you get?

    I have learned very quickly that there are minor modifications that make a HUGE difference.

    I was raised, as many were and still are today, stringing a worm on a hook. Oh how I remember the long lazy summer days when I made an accordian out of a worm on a hook being very careful to have very little of the hook point in the light so the sneaky bait stealing bluegill didn't get it.

    When I got older and started fishing for more manly fish like the big mouth bass, I learned that just hooking a nightcrawler 1 time thru the head would generate 10 times the bites than all balled up on a hook and relegated all the "short strikes" to the guess/fact that all those missing weren't big enough to eat the WHOLE THING!

    Now as my technique evolves, I realize that many times I miss a fish and the hook tip is buried back in the bait. I am so intent on making monster casts that I want to make sure that bait stays on there that I impale the bait with a solid piece of meat on the hook. With a circle you need as little of the hook actually in the fish as possible to prevent that. I have had a 9 inch shad engulfed by a 6 lb channel so eating should never be an issue.

    I have learned the very strongest spots for using cut baits and like to use the mouth through nostrils on live but the idea of a rubber band bridling the fish with a trailer hook intrigues me. I'll have to try it.

    Thanks for the heads up.
     
  18. comanchero

    comanchero New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Minnesota