BRAIDED LINE- Considering a switch? (article for library)

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by stumpjumper, May 21, 2008.

  1. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper New Member

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    I just finished this post that I am considering submitting as an article for the "member library" section. What does everyone think? Any suggestions? Thanks!

    There are many pros and cons to using braided lines over monofilament lines. While the focus of this post will be to offer some helpful insights into braided line usage, I will briefly describe some of the more “common” pros and cons that are discussed regarding these two types of line. No matter what your reason may be for considering a switch, I would like to iterate that the intention of this post is not to start a debate, but rather offer prospective “switchers” a balanced description of some of the pros and cons, as well as some ideas and tips that I have learned since I switched to braided lines.

    One of the greatest benefits of using braided lines, and the sole reason that I made the switch, is their comparatively small diameter. For example, fifty pound test braided line may have a comparable diameter of twelve pound test monofilament line. This conveys an obvious advantage in that you can greatly increase your line capacity, without decreasing the strength of your line. In fact, in most scenarios, you can increase both the strength of the line and your total line capacity at the same time! How much strength do you really need? There are just too many variables to consider and all will be specific to your techniques, the bodies of water that you fish and the species of catfish that you are targeting. Therefore, only you can decide on the strength of line that is needed. Perhaps you are targeting Blues in relatively, snag-free waters. In this case you may only need 20-40 pound test line, and unless your reel capacity is extremely small, there may be no good reason to switch. This all depends on how you weigh the pros and cons. On the other hand, you may be after Flatheads in log-infested rivers with swift current and an occasional rusty bed mattress. Under these conditions, you may want braided line 50 pounds or more, even if it is simply for insurance reasons. The bottom line is that the strength of line that you need will depend on your unique circumstances.

    If you are still considering a switch to braided line, let me first describe some of the cons that might effect your final decision, as well as some solutions that have worked well for me. First, braided lines have very little stretch. This is a considerable difference from monofilament lines, and may even necessitate changes in your techniques. For example, if your style involves any type of hook-set, then you may want to learn to set the hook with a little less vigor. One problem with braided lines is that it is much easier to rip the hook out of the fish’s mouth, a force that is usually absorbed by the stretch of monofilament lines. On the other hand, if you target Bullheads and Channels, you will likely enjoy the fact that braided lines are extremely sensitive. Just don’t set the hook too soon! Braided lines have a whole new “feel” that needs to be learned. Braided line is also considered more visible than monofilament, something to consider if you fish very clear waters.

    What type of rod and reel do you have? Braided lines can be tough on less expensive combos, whether it’s the gears in your reel or the guides on your rod. Foremost, I would highly recommend stainless steel guides on your rods. I have had the nylon inserts pop out on some of my other rods. Now just because it can happen, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try braided lines on less expensive rods. My wife’s Ugly Stick still has all the nylon inserts on its eyelets and she has caught several 40-50 pound fish on that rod. However, I attest that it can certainly happen, so go with stainless if you can! Did you know that Catfish Safari is a BOC sponsor that makes one heck of a fine rod? :0a31: http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60634

    Do not over tighten your drag! :eek:oooh: You must learn to set your drag tight enough, but not too tight. The latter can result in an expensive and time consuming snag which occurs when the braided line digs into the spool. This first happened to me drift-fishing on Santee-Cooper. This was one of my first trips with braided line and I had not ensured that my drag was set to avoid a “dig-in”. My drag was too tight and after a nasty snag on the lake bottom, I had my first bad “dig-in”. I had to cut out all of the line and completely re-spool. :embarassed: This brings me to two other important points of consideration. First off, braided lines are much more expensive than monofilament lines. Second, when you initially spool your reel, you need to use either a monofilament backing or a small piece of tape on your spool knot. Otherwise, the entire spool of line might spin. If this occurs, you will need to pull the line off and spool again using tape or a backing. I highly recommend that you use the knot suggested by the manufacturer of the line. Basically, to avoid a “dig-in”, tighten the drag so that if you are drifting or using circle hooks, there is enough drag and tension for the hook to penetrate the fish’s mouth. Larger fish are then able to pull drag off the reel until you can get the rod in hand. If you free spool or use bait runners, this is not a major concern.

    Dang, how do I break this stuff? :crazy: Well, if you have chosen a very high pound test braided line, you better be ready to deal with inevitable snags! Don’t just start pulling with a tightened drag. Remember the “dig-ins” discussed earlier? You may want to use a small wooden dowel rod or towel to wrap the line and then pull real hard.

    Is it harder to cast? :confused2: The common theme thus far has been that the transition from monofilament to braided line will require a few slight adjustments. Regardless of the style of reel you are using, most everything will remain the same. Just take a few practice casts… adjust the spool tension (baitcaster) just like you would with monofilament. I do have one very important piece of advice for casting braided line. After a snag, fighting a fish or even before the first baited cast of a trip, I take a “pre-cast”. Because braided line has a tendency to embed into itself, it may help to take an unbaited cast to get any embedded areas and kinks out of the line. This way you won’t sling off a bluegill, sending it hundreds of feet to its senseless death. It is a simple precaution that can save you both bait and time.

    There are so many choices to choose from! No problem, just ask any of the knowledgeable folks here on the BOC. :cool2: You will undoubtedly get all kinds of advice, opinions and descriptions. Some braided lines tend to become deformed and flatten easier than others. Some lose their coatings and fray faster. Yet, others seem to cast better. The topic of braided lines comes up quite often on the BOC, which is why I have taken the time to share some of the information that I have learned. Unfortunately, most of it was learned the hard way! :angry: Ultimately, you must consider the pros and cons to determine if braided lines will work well with your style of fishing. :big_smile: Good luck!
     
  2. oh no

    oh no New Member

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    Bad thing about braided line is I broke 2 poles last year with it. But did not lose the fish. lol
     

  3. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

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    I MIGHT HAVE READ OVER IT, BUT I DID NOT SEE ANYTHING ABOUT KNOT TYING
     
  4. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

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    1,602
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    SORRY HIT THE WRONG KET " VERY GOOD POST "
     
  5. big-muddy

    big-muddy New Member

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    1,834
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    norfolk, va
    i use 40# braided remington. it works great. ill never switch
     
  6. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

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    Exceptional article, Marc! Well written in my opinion.

    If I could add any helpful comments it would be very few.

    One is to define "dig in" just a little more for those who have never used braided line, which is your target audience.

    I would add a couple of statements about caring for braided line. Since it is so expensive, do you feel you need to wash it after each fishing trip to keep it clean? How do you know when it's time to respool; eg, fraying, other damage?

    Finally, for our ordinary posts, the smilies are great, but for a library article...well, I would let your fine words speak for themselves. :wink:

    Well done. Reps to you!
     
  7. Sigmar

    Sigmar New Member

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    89
    State:
    Texas
    Another con on braided is I've heard that eventually it will wear grooves in your rods eyelets. There is a reel both spinning and baitcast called spydercast I think. Anyway when reeling in it cross lays the line hence eliminating digging in. personally I like the line due to its sensitivity and it sinks quicker.