Box trap plans?

Discussion in 'Trapping & Fur Taking' started by joecatfish, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. joecatfish

    joecatfish New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    TX
    Does anyone know of a set of downloadable or printable box trap plans on the net? I know how to make them, have made many, but I can't find a single set of plans in a google search, other than 'manually-operated' string triggered ones. We used to make them out of 1x12" pine, or 3/4" CDX cut into 12"x48" strips (3) with shorter pieces for the top and door, some hardware cloth, 3 hinges, a coathanger or two, 4 fence staples, and some 10 penny nails.
     
  2. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Thats funny I was wonderin the same thing I'd like to make some for skunks and cat[ferralhouse mousers] myself
     

  3. joecatfish

    joecatfish New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    TX
    Well, I can certainly tell yuou how, if you are interested. I just thought iot pretty amazing there were no such plans on the net, at least not on the google search i did. It isn't in violation of any laws to post plans for a box trap, is it?

    Skunk? I have a story about a skunk and a box trap.
     
  4. RivrLivn

    RivrLivn Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Missouri
  5. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Here's a link to another set of plans off of a MO website.

    http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/woodwork/ww10/

    I have made 5 traps using these plans and they work real good. I have even expanded and shrunk the dimentions to make different sized boxes. Even made some out of round 6" PVC tube. Only thing I changed was adding a little weight to the door to make it fall faster and stay closed better. Had one pesky coon that figured out how to work the door just right and would get out before I could get out there and fasten the door closed. So I fabricated a spring loaded latch that would lock the door once it fell. Kept me entertained last summer until I caught the 20+ critters feasting on my garbage.
     
  6. joecatfish

    joecatfish New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    TX
    My design (the one I was taught by my uncles 45 years ago) is, in my opinion, much superior to either of these designs. I will draw it out this weekend, and post it, if anyone is interested. I do thank you, though, for posting them. Hadn't seen either design before.

    Guess I will tell the skunk story. Not much of a story, but here goes:
    I set out a box trap for coon in a wooded area on our farm not too far from the house one evening. Next morning, I checked it, nothing. I went to work that day, bailing hay, and got back to the house at twilight. I noticed my boxtrap had been taken in, and placed near a vacant rabbit cage. Then I noticed the skunk in the rabbit cage. I scratched my head, went inside the house, and asked my mom if she knew anything about it. My six year old brother heard, and told me he put the skunk in the cage. I asked how he did it without getting sprayed or bit, and he said he just took the door off, held it near the cage entrance, and the skunk just crawled right in the cage.

    I ended up shooting the skunk in the spine with a scoped .22 mag bolt action, so I wouldn't get sprayed. He (the skunk) got pissed everytime I got within 10 yards of the cage.
     
  7. tfabry

    tfabry New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    Fremont, Wisconsin
    Let me know when you get the plans up. I have been looking for the same info too. - THANKS TODD
     
  8. joecatfish

    joecatfish New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    TX
    I'm at work now. I will draw it up and post it this weekend.


    Guess no one liked my skunk story. Not much of a story, as I said. I just can't figure how a six year old could carry the trap 1/4 mile with a skunk inside it, open the door, and transfer it to a cage without some sort of retaliation by the skunk.
     
  9. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Maybe he talked real nice to him:lol:
     
  10. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    that sounds like my 6 yo. He tried to take a bobcat out of a trap last year still very much alive.
     
  11. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
  12. joecatfish

    joecatfish New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    TX
    Thanks, Crazy. Don't know how that's possible since I came up with links that didn't lead to plans, or that led to very poorly designed plans. I still like my boxtraps a lot better then these Mother Earth plans. The fact that the animal has to pull on a baited string bothers me. In my design, the animal just walks across a see-saw type board on the bottom of the cage, and it's weight triggers the release of the door, which locks behind him.

    It was a pretty busy weekend, didn't get to draw up plans (unexpected guests). I will get it on pretty soon, sorry.
     
  13. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I've made a couple and I also like the see/saw trip lever.
    I used a swing down door that locked with a steel bar that dropped down when the treadle was stepped on.
    Never had any plans though. just trial and error.
     
  14. joecatfish

    joecatfish New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    TX
    I have been really swamped with responsibilities the past week or so, sorry. I will work on the drawings, but in the mean time, I will explain the trap best I can.
    Cut a sheet of 3/4 CDX plywood into four 12" x 48" sections.

    Cut two 2" x 12" bands from three of the four 12 x 48 boards. The remaining 12" x 44" pieces are your bottom and sides. Nail them together to form a channel, the bottom sheet defining the width.

    Cut the remaining 12" x 46" piece in half, so you have two 12" x 24" sheets.

    Nail one two inch band to the back of the trap, across the top and flush with the end of the side sheets. Lay one of the two 12" x 24" sheets on top of the trap, and butt it up against the band or strip of plywood already nailed there. Nail another 2" x 12" band across the top, and flush with the 12" x 24" piece that you just placed there.

    Nail a third 2" x 12" band of plywood across the top front of the trap, flush with the ends of the side sheets. Attach one hardware hinge to it, in the center on bottom.

    Attach two remaining hardware hinges to the remaining 12" x 24" sheet, and attach both hinges to the botton of the middle 2" x 12" band nailed to the top of the trap. This is the trap-door.

    With the door 'closed', measure the distance from the center of the loose hinge to the surface of the door, coming off the hinge at a 45 degree angle. Cut the remaining 2" x 12" to the length you just measured, and attach one end of it to the hinge. This is the door lock.

    Now mark the spot where it hits the surface of the trap-door in the down position, when the door lock is in a 45 degree angle to the cross band, and attach the remaining piece of the last 2" x 12" band to that spot, so it stops the door-lock from sliding further down the trap-door in the closed position.

    The see-saw trigger mechanism:

    Drill two 1/4" holes, one in each side of the trap, 1 inch or so above the top of the bottom sheet, and 12-14 inches from the back edge of the trap.

    Straighten both of the wire coathangers as much as possible, and cut off both ends where they curl. Shove one of the wires through both holes you drilled in the sides of the trap. bend a neat 'u' in the wire inside the trap 10" wide and 3.5" deep. Lay the trigger (8" x 10" sheet of 1/4 inch plywood) under the 'U' in the wire inside the trap, the open end of the 'u' facing the front of the trap (trapdoor), and the rearmost part of the 'u' 1/4" shy of flush with the rearmost edge of the trigger. Nail it on in 4 places with the fencing staples, or 2 penny nails, bent over.

    Flip the trigger over, bending the wire as necessary. Then neatly work the wire back into shape. Bend one side of the wire where it enters the trap, until it's right against the side of the trap, and cut it off at about 1".

    The other end of the wire should be bent up straight toward the top of the trap, being sure the trigger is in the set position (Forward-facing edge flush against the bottom). At the point three inches from the top of the trap, bend the wire at a right angle, toward the front of the trap, but still alongside the side. Cut the wire one inch forward of the last bend.

    Run the remaining straightened wire coathanger along the same side of the trap as the longer piece of trigger wire, and nail it on about 3/4" from the top of the trap, using fencing staples. The first staple should be about 1/2" from the front of the trap, and the second, and final staple should be even with the center of the 1" bend at the top of the 'trigger-wire', with the trigger in the 'set' position. Be sure the wire will still rotate easily, don't drive the staples in too deeply.

    Bend a right angle in the wire at the front of the trap so about 1" or so extends beyond the inside edge of the trap side. This will hold the trap-door open until the trap is triggered. Now bend the other end of the wire at the rear staple downward at a right angle, making certain the front bend is in position to hold the trapdoor up. Cut the wire off 1" below where it crosses the 1" bend in the trigger wire. Set the trap and make sure it operated smoothly. The door should drop as soon as any weight is placed on the upper half of the trigger. The 'lock' should prevent the trapdoor from opening from the inside. Make any minor adjustments as needed.

    Nail 1" or 1/2" hardware cloth over the back opening, and nail two pieces of scrap wood to the rear and center 2" x 12" bands at the top of the trap, to hold the top door in place. Use this door to bait and clean the trap.

    Animals can be taken out live by placing the front of the trap into a sack or cage, and opening the door, shaking or prodding the animal out. Another option is to back your pickup to the trap, add a flexhose extention that reaches the hardware cloth back of the trap, and revving your engine a few minutes. This should kill the coon, or whatever, but make sure it is dead, not just passed out. Then, it can be taken out the top opening of the trap.

    I usually nail some kind of handles to the trap, to make it easier to handle. The size can be changed as needed, but this side will handle squirrels to pretty large old boar coons. I know up there in Indiana, etc.., they have some monster coons, so you might want to go a little biggeer if you are after them.

    I will try to get the drawings done this week. Feel free to ask questions.