Bows for the big boys!

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by catfishrollo, Sep 11, 2007.

  1. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    i have hunted for the past 7 or 8 yrs. using crossbows..i recently got rid of my favorite one a ten point! nice crossbow.. i was losing interest, and want to harvest a deer with something more harder..i'm gonna purchase a compound, and know of all the brands, and bows available, but would like some insight on those with the experience...anyone with any input on what i should buy bow wise, sights, setups etc. please post...i'm hoping to buy this soon, i'm gonna set it all up when i buy....thanks rollo
     
  2. JTR

    JTR New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    virginia
    My first compound was a pse sizzler. I learned to shoot it with out sights. Just looking down the arrow. I did this until I killed my first buck and later added the sights. I think it has made me a better shot by learning to shoot instinctive. I would also recomend practicing as far a possible from your target, then everything closer is usually easier to hit.
     

  3. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    As far as accessories...there is all kinds of stuff out there. I guess I don't have the experience trying out alot of brands (that would get expensive). But I'm a big believer in the drop away arrow rest. My particular one is a Trophy taker (I think it was about $50), but the main thing is the drop away. Another big thing I believe in is a kisser button... it will really help in consistent shooting. I'm not even sure what sight I have on mine, but I think most of them are pretty good. I have heard a lot of people say that they don't like the kind with one pin that you adjust for yardage. Any three pin sight would be a good one to start with. As far as the bow itself... I couldn't really tell you what brand is the best. But I will say that for next year I will probably buy a Mathews, I've heard alot of good stuff about them. Hope this helps a little. Good luck bow hunting... you are going to love it. Once you start though... you will be hooked!:wink:
     
  4. Howie Ketchdem

    Howie Ketchdem New Member

    IM A STAFF SHOOTER FOR PINE GROVE ARCHERY IN CLINTON MICH. I SHOOT A MARTIN SLAYER ITS ONE OF THE FASTEST BOWS OUT THERE SHOOTS NICE. WONT BREAK THE BANK LIKE THE MAT.HOYT.BOW TECH BRANDS EITHER. AND UNLIKE MOST OF THE OTHER BRANDS MARTIN STANDS BEHIND THERE BOWS 100% I HAVE SHOT EVERY BOW MADE, AND HAVE HAD PROBS. WITH EVERY BOW MADE. ALL THE BIG NAMES OFFER LIFE TIME WARR. BUT STILL DONT LIVE UP TO IT. HAVE TO READ THE FINE PRINT AND WITH MARRTIN THERE IS NO FINE PRINT. HAD A LIMB CRACK ONE DAY BEFORE A RATHER LARGE COMPITION. THEY OVERNIGHTED LIMBS WITH NO CHARGE NOT EVEN SHIPPING WONT HAPPEN FROM ANY OTHER COMPANY!! TRY OUT THE SLAYER W/ NITRO CAMS OR THE BENGAL SHOULD BE ABLE TO GET IN BOTH FOR UNDER 400$ ON EBAY OR BUY NEW FOR THE OUSTANDING WARRENTY. BUT THERE SWEET BOWS AND THEY SHOOT LIKE A DREAM. I USE DEAD NUTS PRO SITE 3 PIN FIBEROPTIC SITE. 3-D SUPREME FIXED REST NOT FALL AWY (ONE MORE THING TO GO WRONG) AND DONT BUY A WHISKER BIQUIT YOUR GOING TO HAVE ALOT OF SUGG. TO BUY A BISQUIT BUT THERE LOUD WHEN WET AND THEY FREEZE INTO A BIG CHUNK, IN SNOW, FREEZING RAIN. USE A LIMB SAVER 8-10 INCH STABALIZER AND I SHOOT EASTON AXIS WITH H.I.T. INSERTS THERE THE BEST ARROW IVE SHOT YET, SMALL DIA. FOR MAX PENN. AND STRONG AS A TELEPHONE POLL. BROAD HEADS.. I HAVE HAD A HELL OF A TIME FINDING A FIX BLADE BROAD HEAD TO FLY WELL, UNTIL TIGHT POINT MADE THE SHUTTLE POINTS THERE SWEET, FLY PERFECT CUT LIKE A CHAIN SAW. THATS MY ADVISE FOR YA BUDDY,
     
  5. jeffw51

    jeffw51 New Member

    Messages:
    288
    State:
    mo
    i strongly suggest picking 3 or 4 bows you are interested in,pick them up feel them in your hand,and shoot them.i believe the mathews bows are hard to beat they are light ,quiet and forgiving and fast.thats only my opinion there are alot of awsome bows out there.the set up is easy,you need fiber optic sights for low light conditions,a shoot thru or fall away rest for optimum accuracy,a stabilizer to dampen recoil and a wrist strap to help hold bow when its shot correctly.i prefer carbon arrows they are straighter than alum and they stay that way.
     
  6. jeffw51

    jeffw51 New Member

    Messages:
    288
    State:
    mo
    oh i forgot a very important tool the mechanical release,fingers are simpler but its hard to get a consistant accuracy it takes lots of practice.alot of bows are not designed to shoot with fingers the brace height is to low and they are not forgiving enough making finger shooting a frustrating nightmare.
     
  7. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    first thing u need to do is forget the price of the bow. Go to the bow shop and buy the one that fits u and feels right to you. Some folks like a shorter bow than i do, i want some distance between cams. Another thing to consider is that accuracy is much more important than speed. My bow only shoots 240fps but i can keep it in copenhagen can out to 30 yrds, as far as i will shoot it at animals.
     
  8. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    If you really want a big boy bow forget compounds, get ya a recurve. jmho
     
  9. stinkbaitman

    stinkbaitman New Member

    Messages:
    207
    State:
    south dakota
    whatever you like best is the best bow for you. our teacher tought us that at bowhunter education course.
     
  10. Big B

    Big B New Member

    Messages:
    226
    State:
    North Texas
    Jeff hit the nail on the head. Don't just pick a bow. I would suggest to pick up everything that is the right draw length and peak weight range that you would consider shooting. We have all heard the old saying "don't knock it till you try it". If you go to a reputable dealer with a range they should have no problem letting you try them out. If you are fairly inexperienced ask which bows are more forgiving. Also the same bow will feel and shoot different depending on the cams. A lot of companies offer several cam setups for the same bow. Whether its a traditional 2 cam design or the flatter shooting solo cam. Good luck with your decision. Happy hunting.
     
  11. Luke Clayton

    Luke Clayton New Member

    Messages:
    831
    State:
    Texas
    These guys have given you much good advice. Luke Clayton here. I'm on the Mathews Pro staff. You can go to www.mathewsinc.com and click on pro staff and see me with a wild hog.
    All bow companies make fine bows today. If you're like me, price IS important. Go to a good bow shop and have a qualified bow tech show you his wares. Then... get a SOLID, all metal sight. Stay away from the plastic ones. There are some excellent sights out there today that will stay in place once you have them mounted.
    Above all, FIND a good bow tech. They can be hard to find but experienced archers in your area will help you find one' ask around. A good tech worth his salt will make sure your draw length is correct and get you shooting at 20- yards after he sets your rig up.
    Regardless how strong you are, forget about beginning shooting 70 pounds. This is a common mistake many newcomers to archery make. Have your bow set around 60-64 pounds so that you can shoot many, many, many repetitions.
    Learn good shooting form and practice ONLY as long as you can execute it. Then, my friend, WELCOME to a sport that I am positive you will love.. Good shootin' Luke
     
  12. Big B

    Big B New Member

    Messages:
    226
    State:
    North Texas
    I almost forgot, I have over 15 years experience so maybe I can help out a little. When it comes to sights don't skimp with the money. Make sure it has an aluminum frame and a sturdy sight guard. Preferably a micro adjustable. I use one made by Hoyt but thats what brand of bow I shoot. The cheap plastic sights will often move around due to vibration. They will also break under stress. The first thing I would do with a new sight is change the pins. Some brands come with plastic pins. But, this will depend on which type of pin it uses. Some don't need it. I use a Cobra TKO micro pin. A 20yd red, 30yd yellow, 40yd green and 50yd red. I have used these pins for several years. I can be hard on a bow when pig hunting or walking through the thick brush. I have busted the fiber optics off of my pins getting hung up in vines,but haven't broken or bent a pin. Still dead on. A peep sight is very helpful. I use one with a little hole and have a rubber tube that attaches at the top of the peep and is tied to the cable about 1in above the peep. This keeps your peep straight. And the string from obstructing your view of the sight pins. You could use a kisser button as well but is not necessary. This gives you an anchor point however I don't use one. String silencers are a must seeing that they keep the noise down and in some cases increases the arrow speed. I use the cheap rubber ones but I tie them into my string with serving. This keeps them from moving around. Nock point is important as well. They have several choices. A crimp on rubber lined piece of brass. A string loop, a metal loop (I use one)but it can prematurely break your string, I know from experience. They have some that only work with a special release. That is something you will need to decide. Whether you will use one or not. Thats like a bow they are all different. They have all types too I use a caliper style release aid. A back tension works good as well. After then you c an decide what type of arrow rest you want. Say no to whisker biscuits. Drop aways have to be tuned often but when they are right they are sweet. I use a prong type which forces you to shoot cock feather down. but I haven't had to tune mine in years. Just replace the heat shrink. A wrist sling is a must. It keeps you from dropping your bow when shooting. When shooting a compound you don't "grip" the bow. You should have your hand relaxed and at least partially open so you don't grip the bow. The stabilizer keeps your bow from falling backwards when you shoot. It should fall forward. Almost out of your hand. I would use a 6-8in that is shock reducing. It will keep your bow quiet. Arrow I'm partial to Easton Super Slam XX78 they are aluminum. I wont shoot carbon. Had a friend shoot one that broke upon release and went through his hand between his thumb and index finger. Splintered out really bad. Aluminum is slower and creates less power and can bend. But, are easier to find cracks or other damage. I hit arrows on each other all of the time. And at least one has to be thrown away almost every time. But they can make a cool ink pen. I practice with a satellite match points instead of field points. It flies just like my broad heads (Wasp hammer SST 100gr). You have to shoot both and see if it works for you. When it comes to broadheads you get what you pay for. I hope that you find this post informative and helpful.
     
  13. kkyyoottee

    kkyyoottee New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Iowa
    Take a experienced archer with you if possible some of the pro shops have very inexperienced people working there and if you have a hunting buddy he will spot this as soon as he walks in!! You are there for help not confusion!! You will know the bow for you after you shoot a few. I personaly shoot a Darton I picked up in a pawn shop. It just felt right. I then took it to a reliable bow shop and had it checked out top to bottom!! Good luck to you!!
     
  14. jeffw51

    jeffw51 New Member

    Messages:
    288
    State:
    mo
    will, your right on ,i went into cabelas to buy a dozen arrows,i ended up having to show the employee how to measure my arrows and turn nocks to fit my rest,he didnt even know that different bows shot different arrows,he tried to sell me arrows spined for a 50 lb bow.
     
  15. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia

    That would be my advice also! Especially at close quarters, a recurve is much easier to shoot.