Bowhunting vs Bowshooting

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by flathead willie, Oct 2, 2008.

  1. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Looking through these threads the last few years, I have seen all kinds of very good advice on setups, techniques, bows, and equipment. I think some of the people here seem to think that "bow hunting" and "bow shooting" are the same thing. In bow hunting the operative word is HUNTING. Unless you are hunting quail with a bow, pin point accuracy is not that big an issue. You don't have to be able to split an arrow. On a good day of bow hunting, you will get and need ONLY ONE SHOT. You don't need to hit a deer in the eye ball. You need to hit the deer in the lungs, liver, or heart. At practical ranges, most little league pitchers can do that with a rock! I know hunting situations are different in different habitats. Here is the east, there is rarely an opportunity to shoot an arrow more than 35 yards. (remember that there will be tree branches, leaves, twigs, etc. in the trajectory) To kill a deer sized target at those ranges doesn't require the ability to put six arrows into a 3 inch circle. Of course, if you are hunting wide open areas where it is difficult to get that close to a deer, arrow speed, flat trajectory, and pin point accuracy is much more important. But one has to keep in mind that an arrow looses quite a bit of energy, which translates into loss of penetration and killing effectiveness, after about 40 yards. In Bow Shooting, range style, all you have to do is hit the bulls eye consistently. That requires a different setup, different sights, rests, arrows, etc. A lot of our Olympic archers shoot bows with less then 40# pulls, and put 5 arrows in a 5 inch target at 90 meters. They don't have to get a pass through shot, they have nothing in the way of the target, and do not have to follow a blood trail to recover their game. My point is this. If you are primarily a bow hunter, don't buy into the industry hype of needing all kinds of high tech equipment to put meat in the freezer. It just isn't needed. Archery companies are out to sell you all the newest equipment they can just to make more money. If you are a competition shooter, you may need some of these things to be competitive. If you are a bow hunter you need only three things; a decent bow, an arrow with a sharp breadhead, and hunting ability. Bow hunting is the single biggest thrill of me life. However, I'll be damned if I would pay $800-$900 for a bow to put meat in the freezer. I have a $250 compound bow for the range, it rarely ever goes in the woods, but my $12 recurve bow has put meat in my freezer for 33 years. For 28 consecutive years I have taken my limit of deer by concentrating on my hunting ability, and my knowledge of White Tail Deer, instead of buying into all the hype that bow companies put out every year. Please keep this in mind before you spend all your hard earned money for equipment that you really don't need.
     
  2. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    Very well put willie. I was given that advice when I was younger, back when I was just learning to bow hunt from my uncle. He has been bow hunting for about the same time as you have. I can remember him saying "it don't matter if you have the most expensive set up in the woods if you can't find the game your after, or you don't know your quarry."

    Again this from a man that has hunted with a bow on primarly public land and has taken his fare share of wall hangers.
     

  3. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Well said Willy. I gotta spread the reps before i can spread any on you but this post is definitely rep worthy.
     
  4. Ghosth

    Ghosth New Member

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    241
    State:
    North Dakota
  5. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Thanks for the support guys. I know we have a lot of new people entering this sport and I love to see it. Most of them seem to want to hunt with a bow. I hate to see them spending all kinds of money just because the magazines say "this is the fastest bow in the world", "this is the quietest rest ever made", "these arrows will shoot 5 FPS faster". That crap is just aimed at getting people to spend more money. I was at the archery shop the other day and the clerk was showing a new hunter a cross bow that he claimed was "the best hunting bow on the market." The price tag said $1998.00, and that is before you buy the bolts, broadheads, and all the other accessories. Then he started showing the customer a $400 range finder and a $350 set of binoculars. If I paid that much money for a hunting bow, it better come with steel belted radials and a CD player! LOL
     
  6. bnewsom71

    bnewsom71 New Member

    Messages:
    537
    State:
    Mathervill
    Couldn't have said it any better! I hope EVERYONE that bowhunts, regaurdless of experience level reads what you have said about it. We all need reminders because like you said, it is pretty easy for anyone to get caught up in the hype of the new stuff out there. Again, thanks for the post!
     
  7. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    Great post Willie!!
     
  8. CopeMan

    CopeMan New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    MO
    Willie that is a great way to put it. You are absolutely right. I know i get caught up in all the hype sometimes but like you said just make ethical decesions and play it safe. Thanks for the post.
     
  9. Mi11er

    Mi11er New Member

    Messages:
    5,117
    State:
    Independence, M
    Great post. I love bowhunting because there is not the ease of raising the rifle and shooting a deer at 200 yds. Bowhunting brings you so much closer to nature and gives you "me time" (I don't want to sound like Dr. Phil:crazy:) But being able to shoot 80 yds or being able to split a arrow is not what its all about
     
  10. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    I hear ya willie, Just got to practice my butt off now. Great post.
     
  11. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Your absolutely right Billie. Many bow companies do hype their equipment to make a quick sale and suck us archers into buying there stuff. I for one am guilty of it like thousands of other archers. The bow I own is on the expensive side and yes it's fast to. Quiet also. It's a Hoyt Katera rated at 330 fps. IBO. I paid $799 plus extras in the accesories. Make that around a $1000 bucks grand total!

    Now I'm going to throw a curve ball. Alot of these companies including HOYT make bows aimed at the hunter. They're making faster, quieter, lighter and shoter axle to axle bows. Faster meaning more kinectic energy with lighter arrows at longer ranges. Today a guy can draw only 60 pounds and get the same kinectic energy out of his bow versus a 70-80 draw on an older bow. Archers who have physical difficulty drawing heavier weight don't have to worry about that anymore. They can achieve faster speed for better kinectic energy with a lower draw weight. This is a requirement for some big game animals, like in Africa or other places around the world.

    I use my rig for hunting and for local 3-d competition. My confidence is there if a buck is holding up at 40 yds. I have minimal pin gap to deal with and the speed offers a flatter shot. This also helps in 3-d or paper shooting where forgiveness and speed of the shot helps.

    An ethical shot is a must in hunting! Correct! My bow is very accurate and I put trust in my bow when the shot counts. If I made a bad shot, I'm for sure it's me not the bow!!:big_smile:
     
  12. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    I agree Mark. I stated things are different in other parts of the country, and also that it depends on what an individual wants out of hunting. Yesterday, my hunting partner, Riverdawg1, had 16 deer within 40 yards but had no shots. My hunting style puts me in the thickest places I can find for two reasons; 1. Because around here, that is where the deer stay during the day, and 2. Because I enjoy using the skills I've developed to get as close as I can to the deer. There will always be a need for some of these technical advances, but the AVERAGE bow hunter is strong, healthy, and I believe, eventually becomes a much better hunter than the average gun hunter. I had a hunting buddy, Kenny, that hunted hard with me for almost 20 years. every couple years he got a new bow, a Hoyt, a Golden Eagle, or some "super" new bow. He had all the gimmicks, all the new camo, everything. It took him 20 years of hard hunting to kill his FIRST DEER with a bow, a fawn doe, even when we were hunting the same properties. ( I set him up with a stand in the middle of a thicket, over a scrape that I knew was very active. He wouldn't hunt it because he couldn't see more than 20 yards in any direction. So that evening I got in the stand. An hour later I stuck a 9 pointer with a 20 inch spread,.... at 20 feet! ) Year after year he helped me drag deer after deer, buck after buck out of the woods. To this day, the biggest buck he's ever taken is a 2X2 that he killed out of one of my stands with a 300 Weatherby Mag. All those years he tried to rely on equipment to get a deer. He insisted on hunting places with a wide open view, very little opportunity for a good camouflaged stand, and always felt the need to shoot at every deer he saw, scaring the hell out of any other deer that might be behind it. He would look at the pictures in deer magazines and books, but NEVER read an article. He used to tell me, "That's just one mans opinion." Developing good hunting skills will put more meat on the table, more consistently then the most expensive equipment will. We all hunt for different reasons, but personally, I'd rather have the ability to consistently get within 50' of a deer, then to have the ability to arrow one at 50-60 yards. I have 6 bows, one has taken 129 dear, another has taken 15-20 deer, and I don't have $1000 in all the archery equipment I own! I like that. LOL
     
  13. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    I went out this morning and shot a few and was still way off. I went to sportsmans warehouse and the pro shop guy re-set up my bow. I knew it was off, just didnt know what it was. I was getting 6 inch groups at 20 yards when I left. Now Im a happy camper. :big_smile_2:
     
  14. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Just remember not to practice TOO much. As your muscles get tired and shaky, you may see your groups open up. Take a break and come back to it later.
     
  15. Mi11er

    Mi11er New Member

    Messages:
    5,117
    State:
    Independence, M
    Great advice. Practicing tired and worn out is a good way to learn bad techniques and getting really chapped
     
  16. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    Thanks, I shot six at the range and then went to the pro shop. I shot about a dozen there dialing it in and came home. I figure ill try to shoot a dozen every other day. :big_smile:
     
  17. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    Great advice. I have seen and known several bow hunters that have devoloped some very bad form issues from over praticing. When I first started shooting my bow I started at a dozen arrows a day. Focusing on form. Now I am shooting about two hours a day. One hour in the mornings and one hour in the evenings.
     
  18. dieselcat

    dieselcat New Member

    Messages:
    406
    State:
    Washington, Mis
    Friends and I practice 3-4 times a week and shoot about 100 arrows each time.we shoot our 60 arrows at the 5 spot,then we shoot 5-6 more rounds just to shoot.I know exactly what willie is saying bout getting tired,when i first gained interest in bow hunting i would get tired after about 40 arrows then i would start shooting like crap and blaming it on something i thought i was doing wrong.well the only thing i was doing wrong was not stop shooting for the day. And it was very agervating always trying to figure out why i was shooting good for a while then everything turned to crap,well after reading several books about archery shooting i came to the conclusion i was overdoing it.YOU START GETTING TIRED, hang it up for the day and restart tomarrow.I also learned to only focuse on the arrow you are shooting now,not the 1 before or the 1 after.just kept telling my self this is the 1 and only shot i get at that monster buck so make it count.
     
  19. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    Billie is right. You definitely don't need an expensive rig to kill deer. I hunted for years with a hand me down bow my dad gave me and got my first bow kill with it. After harvesting a couple other deer with it and really becoming addicted to bow hunting, I went and dropped the coin on a Mathews Drenalin, but not after trying out several different brands of bows. To me, I could justify spending a pretty penny on a bow instead of a gun because I would use that bow WAY more than the gun. The gun would get used maybe three or four times a year versus what I use the bow in four months of hunting.

    The newer bows today are like night and day compared to bows from 10 years ago. They are much faster, quieter and smoother drawing. I am pulling 72 pounds on my bow right now, but have seriously thought about trading my 70 pound limbs in for 60 pound limbs because I don't even need 70 pounds. The bow is easy for me to draw at 70 pounds, but 60 pounds is even better especially on those freezing late season hunts when your body stiffens up from sitting in cold weather.

    For anybody who is thinking about getting a new bow, DO NOT ever let anybody tell you what bow you should buy. Be sure to shoot multiple brands and styles of bows. Some people like me prefer a slower, smoother drawing, short axle bow where as some people are all about the speed and don't care if there bow almost tears there shoulder in half when drawing it back. It's all about what fit's your preferences.

    Good luck to everybody this bow season. :big_smile: