Bowfin

Discussion in 'ALL OTHER FISH' started by MattyGfishing, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. MattyGfishing

    MattyGfishing New Member

    Messages:
    88
    State:
    Hawaii
    I caught a bowfin a few years ago and haven't hooked one since. They're great fighters and I would like to catch more. Any special rigs or bait needed? (I caught mine on a night crawler harness.)
     
  2. plumbbob5000

    plumbbob5000 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    State:
    Garner, NC
    Bowfin (Black Fish around home) is one of my favorite fish to catch. :big_smile: They put up a great fight and make a pretty good stew if caught at the right time of year.

    Bowfin seem to bite just about anything, especially when you are targeting something else. When targeting bowfin, I normally use either a light-colored roostertail with a piece of pork fatback cut to a thin "V" shape, or a beetle-spin jig with a light-colored curly-tail grub. Hope this helps.
     

  3. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    I am surprised you caught a bowfin in Michigan. I did not think the ranged
    that far north. In south alabama you catch them regularly on all types of
    artificial bass lures and also live bait. Getting them off the hook thats the
    problem.
     
  4. 1bluedevil

    1bluedevil New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    South Carolina
    We catch these all the time while fishin in the swamp, and we call them (muds). I had no idea that there was yankee bowfin:smile2:. We use a short coated wire leader when fishin in areas with muds, they have very sharp teeth that will cut most any line. A treble hook or a 5'0 circle is hook of choice. The best bait is small pieces of fish or shrimp on a bobber or to blow a nightcrawler so it will float. You can buy a worm blower or use a syringe from the farm store. Look for the muds coming up and getting air and fish there. They like still black water and dont get going good until warm weather. If you are going to eat them be sure and soak them a couple of hours in ice cold salt water or you will find out why we call them muds:eek:oooh:. Look at the world record bowfin pics online. It was caught in Lake Bowman, S.C.
     
  5. Cattn-Jeep

    Cattn-Jeep New Member

    Messages:
    236
    State:
    NC
    I've always had a hard time chooking them. They always tear my minnows up. Literally, tear them I mean, right off the hook. They always seem to grab them from the tail and tear them off my hook.
     
  6. 1bluedevil

    1bluedevil New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    South Carolina
    Put on a stinger. (treble tied to main hook with wire leader) use a small treble and that should get those short biting muds.
     
  7. C_wernett

    C_wernett New Member

    Messages:
    693
    State:
    North Carolina
    Bowfin have a HUGE range. I've caught them as far north as Lake Titanka in Minnesota! They'll eat anything from earthworms, crayfish, and fish, and actually when they are going good with hammer a frog! You can catch them on any artificials that will catch bass. They've got strong teeth and a pretty tough mug all together, so make sure circle hooks are sharp, and j-hooks get set HARD. Then hang on for the ride! My most common way of catching them is either on a fish-finder rig with a strip of cutbait, or with a live bait under a cork. Nothing beats seeing one blast a live frog on the surface though!!!
     
  8. unclebuncle

    unclebuncle New Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    State:
    Humboldt,K
    Bowfin are listed as one of Kansas fish species but I've never caught one here.Wouldnt mind if I did though I used to catch them all the time in N Florida and they are fun.
     
  9. dahut

    dahut New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    sc
    Time to rig a trailer on your main hook.
     
  10. dahut

    dahut New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    sc
    Something savvy carp eaters do (as opposed to mere carp anglers) is to soak their cleaned fillets in lemon-lime soda pop. Yep, you read that right... 7-UP.

    Once caught, get the fish field cleaned and on ICE - ASAP. You mentioned they don't "get going" until the weather warms. Leaving them on the bank for hours in the sun, or kicking around the bottom of your pirogue wont help their eating qualiities when the heat is on. They tend to go "mushy" pretty quick if mishandled.

    As with any fish, the best eating is assured when they are made ice-cold right after being caught.

    Once at home, or camp, fillet them and place the cleaned fish in the soft drink and soak it in your refrigerator/cooler for an hour. Finally, dry the flesh well before cooking in whatever way you choose.

    A few other things that may improve the flavor of "muddy" fish like bowfin is to ensure all off color meat from the sides, tops and bottoms is removed. Oils accumulate there that give that swampy, "off flavor."

    It has also been a standard to soak such fish in milk. The proteins in the milk bind with these oils, and so the off-flavors they harbor are tossed with the milk. However, with milk costing as much as gasoline these days, using it in this way is a decision more of the pocketbook than of gastronomic utility.

    Bowfin has long been a key ingredient in fish patties and stews, common ways to use less pristine fish. Smoking them is also mentioned often. However, don't think less of them for it. In Louisiana, they are known as choupique* (shoe-peek) and are relished as a delicacy. There, they enjoy a certain mystique among the locals as something special. Even their roe, called 'Choupique Royale' is considered a delicacy.

    * Some folks back in the bayous will tell you the name 'choupique' is improperly applied to the bowfin. They say the 'choupique' is actually an even more primitive fish found there. But the name, right or wrong, has pretty much stuck to the bowfin.
     
  11. dahut

    dahut New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    sc
    In Mississippi, they never let the cleaned fillets touch water once they are cut loose. This is from Mr. James Luke:

    "The trick to cooking and eating 'grinnell' (another common name for the bowfin) is to never let the meat touch water after you dress the fish. We filet the fish and then cut the filets into pieces about a finger and a half wide. The pieces are doused with Worchestershire sauce, mealed and fried just as you would a catfish filet. Grinnell is also best when caught before the water gets too warm.

    Remember, don't wash the meat after you dress the fish. Something about that turns the thing to cotton. It is also best if eaten the same day."
     
  12. catdaddy007

    catdaddy007 Member

    Messages:
    406
    State:
    SE Arkansas
    Now yall got me wanting to try some grinnel. My wife used to work at a fish market and she said they would mix in grinnel ribs with the buffalo ribs. Shhhhh !!! Don't tell anybody.
     
  13. StuBaby76

    StuBaby76 Guest

    I don't much about eatin them, but I don't mind a bit catchin them!! I recently caught a 12pd Bow & have caught many others in the same range, while catfishin. They do give a good fight! Catfish or not, their still fun!!!!