Bow Hunting Help/Suggestions

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by H2O Mellon, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    Well it's finally here. As Chubbahead said in a diiferent post, he has an itch & eventually will scratch it.

    I am now scratching mine. I finally listened to my brother in law. I shot my Mathews Ultra 2. Now I can't wait for deer season. I haven't shot a compound bow for 15 years. i remebr I hunted with one when I was 13 or 14, but then moved to cross bows. I did pretty well earlier, being that I haven't shot for so long. I was hitting mostly "4's" at 20 yards using "5X's" for targets, which is plenty good for hunting. I am gettign 265 fps using 100 grain field points & PSE Carbon Force 200's. (I think they are 200's.) I have the bow at 60#'s. I have a trophy ridge right, with a bwhisker bicuit rest. I'm being pressured to get rid of the whisker buscit but I like it. I may have to send my sight back to trphy ridge becasue the 1st pin popped out. The release I am using is a true ball, forgot the actual model.

    Can anyone give me some suggestions as to changes? How do you guys feel on using 200's versus 300's? The 200's are usually for 40-60# draws & the 300's are for 50-70 I think. What would be the advantage of going to 300's from 200's? Would my speed be that much different?

    What about broadhead? I plan on using NAP Shockwave 100's. I know some states don't allow Mecanical head but Ohio changed a few years back & we are now allowed to use them.

    I am going to try & get more comfortbale in trees before deer season. I may also go & make me a couple fixed stands from treated 2x4's. I'm getting that feeling..... BUCK FEVER.

    Thanks guys. i'll be waiting & hope to see/red some good advice.
     
  2. Bigones

    Bigones New Member

    Messages:
    161
    State:
    Ohio
    I would drop it down to a 85 grain. I shoot a pse 300 carbon but if your only pullin 60lbs then you should be fine with the 200. I was shooting a 240 when I had mine set at 60lb and it did fine. It really doesn't matter what you shoot as long as you can put it where you want it to go. Everyone has there own opinions. All I can really suggest is try differnt setups and find what you are most comfortable with. I used the whisker bisket for years and never had a problem. My new bowteck has a drop away rest and I like it also.
     

  3. NCCatter

    NCCatter Member

    Messages:
    462
    State:
    North Carolina
    Mellon,
    Can't help you much with the arrow question, but with broadheads I use fixed blade only. I have talked to a couple people who have bad luck with them (not opening) and for me that is enough to make me stick with fixed blade. There will be people who disagree with me I'm sure, about the performance of mechanical broadheads. They say a mech. head flies like a field point but the thing is, if you PRACTICE enough with fixed blade heads, then you won't need your broadhead to shoot like a field point. I shoot the Muzzy 4 blade heads and I practice alot with the "practice" blades that come with them and I haven't missed a deer yet with them (killed 4 and a bobcat). With the bobcat I'm not sure a mech. would have opened in time to do it's job. Just my opinion now, sure some people will shred my ideas though. Hope this helps.
     
  4. Backwater

    Backwater New Member

    Messages:
    161
    State:
    Tennessee
    Why change now? You just started shooting after 15 years. Your setup sounds fine. 100's of deer have been killed with less. Practice with what you got and hunt a season with your rig. Then explore any short comings you might have encountered during the year and ways you can improve. Don't get caught up in the media driven quest for the newest, latest, and most costly gadget. As long as you can put them where you want at the speed you have stated, your doing better than most. Save your money for the most comfortable tree stand you can afford.
     
  5. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    The actual bow is here for a while. It wil last me a long time. I was really wondering about sights/rests, etc. I have always told peopl in the past that I'd rather shoot 190 fps & be accurate than shoot 300 fps & have arrows (bolts) go everywhere, but of corase that was speaking of cross bows.

    I made the 190 fps & accurate vs. 300 fps & unaccurate in regards to Horton vs Barnett cross bows. In the past those Barnetts could really push a bolt, but I cant tell you how many people were unhappy with them due to them being so lacking as far as accuracy, Hortons on the other hand may not have been as fast (apples to apples) but were much more accurate.


    NCCatter until last year I had alwasy used Muzzy 3 blade 125's. I used them for I guess 10 years. (again, from a cross bow) Man, it doesnt seem that long but I guess it has been. I tried the Shockwaves last year & WOW!. They are extremely accurate but also VERY devestating. The doe I got last year was really a mess. If I wasnt the one that shot her I would never hasve beleived that the exit hole was casued by a broadhead, or coarse the enter hole was nice too.

    I'm going to take my time with everything. I am going to limit my shot to 30 yards and as strange as it sounds hope like heck that the first deer I see isnt a nice Buck. I am hoping to harvest a doe during the 1st day or two fo archery season. I want to absoultely know for certain that I am ready to take on a nice buck before hand. I am real big into not wounding a deer. Shoot over the years at my aeas I've treated them more like pets. Last year I hunted at other peoples areas, hoping I woudlnt have to take one of mine!!!! :)
     
  6. copycat

    copycat New Member

    Messages:
    1,841
    State:
    New Jersey
    I shoot 100 grain NAP Thunderheads, Have used the mechanicals but I favor the Thunderheads. Stick with what the easton chart or your brand of arrow recommends for the spine. Keep the wiskerbiskit because they are great for unexpected angles. Make sure you are comfortable with the total setup (peep, kisser button, release, etc,) Then it's just a matter of lots of practice!
    try "mock" hunts from your stand and shoot different yardages and angles so there is no suprises when the moment arrives. I only use feathers on my arrows with the Wiskerbiscut and never veins. Feathers pass through the biscut with very little resistance unlike veins. Last year I started using what is called a Tree saddle from Trophy line products and it is awsome. It allows me to position myself to hit any target 360 degrees! Check it out. Remember tight grouping of your arrows on the target is just as important as accuracy. I also use the trophy ridge pentullum site and I am very happy with that as well!
     
  7. NCCatter

    NCCatter Member

    Messages:
    462
    State:
    North Carolina
    copycat,
    How do you like that tree saddle? I have seen it advertised but I didn't know if it was a gimmick or not. Doesn't look very comfortable to me.

    As far as the Whisker biscuit I had one on my Hoyt Hypertec and loved it, but the only reason I changed was because it made the vanes peel off the arrow very often. Got the Trophy Ridge Dropzone now and love it.
     
  8. copycat

    copycat New Member

    Messages:
    1,841
    State:
    New Jersey
     
  9. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,172
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    Stick with what you have, keep it simple and what fits your budget. Focus more on shooting technique and hunting situations such as:

    1. study arrow flight when shooting from elevations (treestands)
    2. shooting from the ground while kneeling
    3. judging yardage
    4. reducing noice on your equipment and clothing.
    5. practice shooting after being at full draw for an extended amount of time.
    6. practice shooting in heavy cover and have pre-determined shooting lanes. ( tall weeds, thickets, sapplings )

    all of my short comings have come from hunting situations where I was not prepared to adapt.
     
  10. Mountain Cur

    Mountain Cur New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    Missouri, Warsaw
    Wolfman and Backwater pretty well covered the issues most of us face. If what you have works don't change for the sake of change. About the only changes I've noticed after I found a setup that worked was the fine tuning. He He, stick bow with orford cedar arrows to recurve and aluminum arrows, to compound and carbon/aluminum and I just received some graphite arrows I'm going to try..I never really like carbon arrows after I saw one break and go through a mans forearm. The only real change I have made is I have started turning the draw weight down, but I started shooting in the mid 50s so there might be a reason. Practice, Practice, Practice, remember practice does NOT make perfect if you are practicing WRONG.
     
  11. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Any SHARP broadhead will kill a deer. The speed is secondary as long as you hit what you are shooting at. I shoot a 67# recurve with 125 grain Bear heads and 2117 arrows. Most of the time the arrow goes right thru with no problem. I've even had two deer shot in the chest where the arrow went thru so fast the deer didn't even know they were hit and went back to feeding....but not for long! If you do your scouting right, all your shots will be close enough that any hunting bow and any arrow will do the job. My hunting partner went for 20 years hunting his butt off without getting a deer because he felt like he HAD to shoot at every deer he saw. Wait for the deer to get where you know can kill it, pick a spot, and fire up the grill!
     
  12. IL Hunter

    IL Hunter New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Normal, IL
    I shoot my arrows a little on the heavy side. I'm pulling back about 68#. I'd say just shoot what you are comfortable with. Just don't shoot arrows that don't weigh enough. The best thing you can do is do a lot of shooting before the season starts so when a deer walks in front of you you can hit him in the vitals with confidence.
     
  13. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
    Melon, You've gotten some good advise and I think the best is to practice. Practice out of a tree at unknown yardages. Have somebody to place targets around you and gather up your arrows and get them back up to you. One thing that helped me was when I started shooting some tournaments. (I even won 1 and placed in a few more) You can check around and I'm sure you can find some 3-D shoots and around here they will have a shoot just before seasons open that will let you shoot broadheads.

    I had to retire from bow-hunting due to health problems but not before I had taken 16 and it was a hoot. I would rather sit in a tree with a stick and string and see a deer that was not in range than to kill a big buck with a gun.

    I only see one big problem, bow-hunting is as addictive as catfishing and the BOC. When are you going to have the time?:roll_eyes:

    ST
     
  14. metalfisher

    metalfisher New Member

    Messages:
    188
    State:
    Arkansas
    I been shooting a stick & string since 1963. Every year I try something new just because I get the "fever". But, there is one rule that never changes. Keep it simple.

    The more "gadgets" you use, there more that can go wrong. So, when you get something that works, the best thing to do is stay with it.

    I shoot long bow, recurve & compound. The compound I shoot is a Browning Micro Adrenaline set at 47# with a whisker biscuit and a 1 pin fiber sight. The two bucks I shot last year were pass throughs with carbon arrows. I don't even remember the shaft size but I got them at Walmart. I have arrows scattered all over the house.

    I have tried Pearson, Bear, Hoyt, Golden Eagle, Onieda, Mathews & Browning bows compounds and Tenpoint and Barnet crossbows. I have used arrows up to $150 a dozen and down to 50 cents each. I have mounted lazers and every gadget you can think of on bows.

    The point I am making is that their is always going to be some new thing to try. But, you owe it to yourself and your prey to be able to consistantly hit what you shoot at. You MUST have confidence in your equipment so get it set and keep it there during season. Play with bow during the summer.

    As far as arrow size, here is an interesting fact. I set up a 3/4 inch piece of plywood at 15 yards in my backyard. Using the 47# bow, I shot if with carbon arrows with 85 grain field point. The arrow was very fast but just the tip of the field point could be seen penetrating the plywood.

    I then shot it with a 2216 gamegetter with 125 grain field point. I had 3 inches of arrow sticking out the plywood. So don't get all hyped up on speed. Keep your shots under 30 yards and you will be alright with about any shaft but the heavier the better.

    Robert
     
  15. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Robert gave some good advice and I agree. I've tried all sorts of setup over the years and found what works best for me is a stiff recurve, heavy arrows, no sights, and close range shots. It has put a lot of deer in the freezer.What alot of people seem to forget is; this is bow HUNTING, not just bow SHOOTING. The best equipment in the world won't put a deer down if you don't practice good hunting skills. I learned years ago to hunt like I was the one being hunted. It's just this simple; if the deer finds you first, you lose!
    After that it's like Robert said, if you are confident with your equipment, have done your practice, the shot will be no problem at all.
     
  16. bmaultbay

    bmaultbay New Member

    Messages:
    498
    State:
    Clarksville, Tennessee
    I think I would check an arrow chart and check your weight. I believe you should be shooting something around a 400, 200 is really light, you have to be getting some serious flex in your arrow. As for the whisker biscuit, I would stay with it, for hunting. You can noc an arrow, place it is the biscuit, and not worry about it beating around on the rest. My brother in law gave me an article to read once about shooting cold. What I mean by that is making the first arrow count. No warm-up shots in the woods. The article says that when practicing you should wait 5 minutes or so between shots. That way each shot is like your first. Nothing like drawing back on a bow in 30 degree weather at 6 in the morning from a tree stand. Practice the way you are going to hunt. As my brother in law taught me, shooting from a tree stand is a lot different than shooting from the ground, as well as terrain effects, up hill and down hill. Then last but not least, distance estimation, will get you everytime. I currently own a Diamond Rapture, set at 62lbs, with 29 1/2 draw. 80% let off. Love that bow.
     
  17. Nightprowler

    Nightprowler New Member

    Messages:
    296
    State:
    ohio
    Melon,I shoot a mathews switchback and I tried a whisker biscuit on it and I really like it.My bow is set at 70lbs and it really shoots.As far as broadheads go I tried new archery products Nitron and man do They shoot good they are a fixed broadhead small and compact with a cutting diameter of 1-1/16 in. 100 grains.I shot 2 deer with them this past season and had no problems with them.If you would like to shoot sometime let me know.
     
  18. r_p_narramore

    r_p_narramore New Member

    Messages:
    179
    State:
    East KY
    Like what some of the others have said, don't get too hung up on arrow speed. I like a fairly heavy arrow with a good fixed blade broadhead. I have never had any problems getting complete pass-throughs with the fixed 2-blade broadheads. Whatever you use, just make sure to keep it sharp.
     
  19. Duck65

    Duck65 New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    Piedmont,SC
    I use the 200's also 28" with 100gr. Slick Tricks with bow set at 52lbs and love my biscuit.:big_smile: