Bottom fishing

Discussion in 'Bluegill Fishing' started by Ravensmavsfan, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    Does anybody bottom fish for bluegill, if i can't get them to bite on the top i ussually take the boober off and let the bait lay on the bottom with a small weight.
    On the bottom i use small chunks of beef liver and magic bait panfish doughballs which are bright pink and easy to locate.

    I've only been using this technique since they've moved deeper, but the smallest one i have caught was 4'', i also have caught a few small bullheads.
     
  2. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    There are some places around here where on the bottom is the only way that works. Mostly for me it's in faster water or close to the bank in shallow water, but not always. For bait I use wax worms and red worms. As in most fishing, I keep trying different things untill something works!
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Most of the places I fish for bream have a very rocky bottom, and if you let your bait lay on the bottom, you'll hang up almost every time.
     
  4. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Gulp, has come out with a night crawler shaped bait for gills. I baught a jar at wally world a few days back. I will try this spring when I start gill fishing for bait.
     
  5. Cataholic

    Cataholic Guest

    I 'Gill fish Spring to late Summer for table fare, Yum-Yum 99% of the time my baits are an inch or so off the bottom due to the fact that 'Gills will be deep in the daylight to avoid predators such as Bass. Never tried night fishing for 'Gills.
    My son-in-law had an aquarium full of 'Gills he used for Flats and at night when you'd walk in the room where he kept them and flipped on the light you could see this action. They were all suspended in the dark and hit bottom with the light.
    Ain't nothing like finding them bedded up and catching 3 or 4 on the same peice of worm! I've even had 'em hit a bare hook (gold aberdeen) when they put the feed bag on.
    Now that's Cool! :cool:
     
  6. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    I've tried fishing on or near bottom for gills in the spring and summer, actually on up untill November here in southeast Texas, and never had any luck catching the big ones. Most of my 8-12 inch gills come from about 18"-3' deep on my principal eating size gill lake, usually in 12' for water.
     
  7. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    If I am not having any luck I just change my depth or location till I find them. A suspende bait is easier for them to get into their mouth even if it is just off the bottom.
     
  8. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I find alot of times the only way I can catch them is to remove the bobber..I use no weight and bait up with a wax worm, slowly let it sink and they will usually hit it when it falls..Now if they are nesting I drag the bait on the bottom thru the nest and they will usually pick it up.
     
  9. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    I generally use a split shot and act as if I am useing a cane pole. By this I mean that i just dip the bait into the water and suspend about 1 to 2 inches from bottom. I find this is best done in areas of rock along the rip rap.
    I also use a bobberwith apx 1 to 2 foot of depth and cast along the shore line and retrieve it along a path I feal is the same depth as I have set up for.
    As mentioned before gills like cover. Weather it be the bottom, rocks, or brush.
    Pound for pound gills give one heck of a fight. Personally I like catching them just about as much as I like catching cats.
    On a side note.... with lake levels down in the winter you can put rocks out in an area that you fish in the spring. As well as you can find areas that have underwater (at normal lake levels) structure. I typicly find the gills tend to stay fairly close to shore. As far as where to find them in the winter...good luck.
     
  10. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Here's how I get them on the bottom:

    I use a sabaki rig and put a 3 ounce weight on the bottom of it and just throw it in a good bream spot and put a tiny bit of slack in your line.....wait for the bream to tap it and just lightly set the hook.

    And for bait I get a box of nightcrawlers and cut them into small little pieces and put them on all of the sabaki hooks....I've caught up to 4 bream at the same time doing it that way.

    Also you can do it for crappie and put little minnows on the sabaki rig......you would be surprised at all the fish a sabaki rig will catch...... ;)

    good luck :)
     
  11. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    I think i'm going to try suspending the bait of the bottom with a sunken bobber holding the bait of the bottom about 6 inches.

    Bottom fishing snags too many weights.
     
  12. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Gills don't stay near the shore, but near cover. I fish one lake where the gills a located several hundred feet from the nearest shoreline, but hydrilla covers much of the lake and gives them cover. The water is at a max, 12 ft, but no less than 8.
     
  13. chinook

    chinook New Member

    Messages:
    32
    State:
    Illinois
    I live in the midwest. I fish for gills a lot, especially in the hottest days of summer and in winter. If you haven't tried a 1/32 oz crappie jighead baited only with a redworm on 4 to 6 lb test you should give it a try. I fish water from 6 inches to 15 feet. I can't remember the last time any of my fishing buddies have outfished me. Also hang on for the occasional catfish and bass.
     
  14. Environmentor

    Environmentor New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Buffalo, Iowa
    Ravensmavsfan, I NEVER (well, almost never) use a bobber. I always fish the bottom. Like a lot of these guys I find all my fish deep and near structure (remember that they are insectivorous/piscivourous so they really like hanging around submerged vegetation and trees to eat the worms/insects/snails/etc.). Like deltalover says, there are somplaces "where on the bottom is the only way that works" and that is true here on the overfished lakes I fish at. Everyone around here uses bobbers and they catch 2"-4" fish, I fish at/near the bottom and catch 6"-10" bluegills. As tncatfishing says, "suspende bait is easier for them to get into their mouth even if it is just off the bottom" and I find most my fish hit the bait on the fall near the bottom. The rigs I typically use are a hook with a single split shot a foot up tipped with a whole/half nightcrawler or leafworm. Or, the rig chinook uses. I agree with chinook (and I too live in the midwest, IOWA, so maybe it is just a midwestern thing) best his rig is the BEST rig. Like, chinook says, I too fish alot for gills (mainly in the summer for me) because like Okccatman states "Pound for pound gills give one heck of a fight" and they are my favorite fish to fish for (and they are great eating). But, usually when I am out fishing I am not targeting a species, just looking to catch anything. This rig, tipped with nightcrawlers, is diverse. Like chinook I use 1/32 oz jigheads or icejigs tipped with a whole/half nightcrawler. I use light line to cast the lightweight rig farther. I, too, fish water from 6 inches to 15 feet deep when I am from my boat. I cast toward the bank, and bring the worm back to me. On the bank, I cast out deep, as far as I can. I find most of my fish take this rig on the fall. However, some (especially catfish/carp) take the bait off the bottom after it has sat for a few minutes. I too have outfished many people on this rig, in fact I have never been outfished by anyone using a different rig (I have only been outfished by my partners/family using the same rig). As chinook says he catches "the occasional catfish and bass" but by switching up from a skinny redworm to a fat nightcrawler I often catch bass, catfish, carp, and even crappie (among other species) on this rig, and yes even small fish get hooked (i've caught 1"-2" fish on this rig) because a nightcrawler is not too big. As, for jtrew who states "Most of the places I fish for bream have a very rocky bottom, and if you let your bait lay on the bottom, you'll hang up almost every time" then just use a hook and a worm and let it fall but real it in before it hits the bottom - NO WEIGHT. I use this to catch shallow fish in place of a bobber, or to catch cold front fish, because the extra slow fall is great. Regardless of the rig, I put all my worms on hooked once, right through the head/front so they hang longwise like a rubber/plastic worm rig (you might lose a few more bites/worms than normal, but you should catch alot more fish, too). I usually just let the fish pick up the bait and run (but, I get some deep hooks and have to scarifice the rig to realease the fish). These rigs have probably cught 99% of my total fish, in my life. I have caught +15lb carp, 20"-25" catfish, +20" bass, stringers of crappie, stringers of BIG bluegill, +1lb bluegill all on this rig. I know this rig isn't the greatest thing to fill your freezer with catfish (because I know channels love stink and really big flatheads need really big bait - like bullheads/bluegills) or to catch crappie (because crappie prefer minnows) or to get a bunch of huge bass. But, this jig rig works GREAT for catching ALOT of fish with DIVERSE species, you can catch all kinds of different fish in the same day, and makes for a great/exciting day of fishing. Also, works great when teaching little kids, because like the bobber you can just tell the kid watch the line and when the lax line moves and straightens out that is when they set the hook. This is the rig my little brothers were taught on, and it will be the rig I teach my kids on.

    The only problems with this rig is that I have run in with are gut hooked fish (the small rig and letting the fish run is the cause), but I have cut this down by trying to hook the fish earlier with out letting them run. Also, the light 4lb mono I used sometimes let really big fish get away, so lately I have been using 2lb spiderwire too solve this problem (but, caused the next problem). Also, the extra light wire hooks often found on icejigs straightened under the weight of really large fish, so I have found some jigs that use a heavier hook.

    So, give this rig a try. It is well worth your effort.
    P.S. let me know if you like it. Definitely let me know if it don't work for you, because I would find that to be rare, unless it is just a midwest rig.
     
  15. katfish hunter

    katfish hunter New Member

    Messages:
    105
    State:
    Jacksonville,FL.
    Well it depends where you are fishing. How deep is the water? What kind of cover is there under the water?Just experiment with a bobber set at different depths. Some times a bobber can be more productive than bottom fishing.Also consider the temperature.The larger bluegills usually stay in deeper water.If it is winter you should almost always fish on the bottom for bluegills.
     
  16. fishn_maniac

    fishn_maniac New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    Al
    Yea thats basically the only way i usually fish for them.With a weight and nightcrawler is how i was taught by my granfather.Try it u should have pretty good luck with it.
     
  17. shadow

    shadow New Member

    Messages:
    136
    I use a 1/32oz jig tipped with a wax worm. Either under a float(shallow fish) or fish with my crappie pole and a titeline.just off the bottom(deeper water).