Boats for Rivers?

Discussion in 'Boating' started by GarH, Aug 19, 2007.

  1. GarH

    GarH New Member

    Messages:
    65
    State:
    Arizona
    What are the best catfishing boats for rivers?
     
  2. Mike81

    Mike81 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,231
    State:
    Alabama
    There are alot of opinions on that, kinda hard to answer. Depends on what kind of river you frequent, fast, slow, big, small, how you plan to fish. Everyone has there favorite setup and a dozen different boats will be perfect for a given situation. Maybe add details on the river you'll be fishing and some local experts can give some specific advice.

    Good Luck and Good Fishin :big_smile:
    Mike
     

  3. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I second that. The rivers around here I'd want a flat bottom skiff.
    For a larger river with barge traffic you might want something a little bigger with some deadrise to it.
     
  4. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Welcome to the board, Greg.

    Mike an Mark told ya right. Give us some info and maybe someone will guide ya in the right direction.
     
  5. pappy3

    pappy3 New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    texas
    I agree with the above statements. I have been on a river here in the south and felt perfectly safe until a tugboat came by and made a wake behind it that almost swamped the flat bottom we were in ! I use a deep-v with a 90 hp motor , it is just a 16 ft but it is a safe , dry ride! Other than the safety issues the next thing to do is just figure out how you want it set up for your style of fishing! Thanks for the post it is a very good question for many who might be considering their first boat! I am on my boat #6 and still make a few changes every now and then. Never enough time and never enough money but always enough ideas :smile2: pappy3
     
  6. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
    Unspecified
    Yep, Gary, that's about as wide open of a question as you can ask. There are those of us who won't settle for less than a deep-V, while others launch out in float-pontoon boats.

    As for me, I wouldn't think of floating anything other than my Heritage Redfish 12' Angler kayak. Considering the entire outfit, right down to vest, cart, paddle, etc. cost under $1,100, it wasn't a bad investment.

    You'll find that there is a diverse bunch of fishermen bound together by a love for the sport, not a particular boat. Enjoy the ride!

    http://www.catfish1.com/gallery/files/7686-P1010391.JPG
     
  7. GarH

    GarH New Member

    Messages:
    65
    State:
    Arizona
    Thanks for the replies. I actually didn't any one river in mind. I was just thinking of a general river boat. I guess that is a little vague and non specific.

    What is deadrise?
     
  8. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    Name:
    Unspecified
    I'm going to have a little more fun with you, Gary...which deadrise are you referring to? :crazy:

    Deadrise as a boating definition is the angle between the bottom of a boat and its widest beam. A vessel with a 0º deadrise has a flat bottom, and high deadrise numbers indicate deep V-shaped hulls; in fact, a DEEP VEE is a hard chine power boat having a 15º or more angle deadrise at the transom.

    A Cheapeake Bay deadrise is a type of work boat used in the Chesapeake Bay. Traditionally wooden hulled, the deadrise is characterised by a sharp bow quickly becoming a flat bottom hull, with no deadrise. There is a small cabin structure forward and a large open cockpit and work area aft.
     
  9. Todd Strong

    Todd Strong Active Member

    Messages:
    1,023
    State:
    Cambridge, Ne
    I myself use an 20ft lowe roughneck powered with an 140 HO evinrude, If I was thinking of purchasing an boat , the two things I would keep in mind would be, welded aluminun not riveted, jon boat 18' and up, semi v 16' and up. I would stay away from fiberglass at all cost, makes it hard to pull up to rock dikes and banks.
     
  10. GarH

    GarH New Member

    Messages:
    65
    State:
    Arizona
    Once again thanks for the information. My boat knowledge is almost 0.
     
  11. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    i haven't run into too many problems running my fiberglass boat in the rivers, just have to slow down and be careful... i'm installing a keel sheild here in the next couple of weeks to prepare for fall fishin which will be a bit more forgiving when runnin up onto the banks and hittin stuff i can't see... had a patch on the keel when i bought the boat, so i have re-inforced that area with more fiberglass, and the keel sheild is next to give it a bit of cushion in that area as well... as has been said though, its the love of the sport and not the boat... lol... although i can't wait to get a pontoon boat... oh yeah... lol
     
  12. Mike81

    Mike81 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,231
    State:
    Alabama
    It all comes back to where are you going to be running. If you think almost all rivers, especially shallow rivers, go aluminum. If you hit something, aluminum is easier and cheaper to fix then glass and if something does happen it will usually only dent and let you keep on fishin. :wink:

    Good Luck and Good Fishin

    mike
     
  13. vfourmax

    vfourmax New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Va
    Another main consideration is also the budget you have to work with. That not only includes the original purchase price but also in operating cost and the amount of use it will see. If you are a person that likes to try to get out at least several times a week compared to 3 or 4 times a year gas consumption can relate to being a factor if your fishing budget is somewhat limited. Also in the same catorgory may be the towing capability and gas consumption of the vehicle required if you need to tow any distances to get your boat in the water.
    If the waters fished do not require the use of of a larger or higher horsepower boat and your budget may be somewhat limited perhaps a nice 10 year old aluminum boat package with a 30 horsepower outboard would better suite your needs than the new boat with the 175 horsepower that needs to set in the driveway because the dollars are not there to operate it.
    Just another thing to consider for many people