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Jon from Indiana
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Discussion Starter #63
So far my buddy and I (mostly my buddy) have cleaned the carbs, fixed a leak, flipped one set of reeds, change spark plugs, applied some lube to some areas.

Then with the trailer we rigged the wiring so it will work, we are going to do a better job when we get more time. Also greased the bearings.

He even got my crazy trolling motor that had a mind of its own to work! And its nice, foot control ! He said all it was was some cables came loose.

I still have some small things to do to it and get but I have a feeling that list will never be completely checked off:laugh:
 

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Eric from Traders Point, Indiana USA
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I have a 1979 Evinrude on my boat. One thing that to keep an eye on is something that I didn't read in any problem shooting articles. I'm pretty sure your motor is very similar to mine.
The motor has a thermostat, and sometimes the vanes on the water pump impeller break off and get stuck in the thermostat. This causes the motor to overheat because water isn't moving through the motor as fast as it should. It was hard to diagnose because water was coming out of the drain hole, just not near as much volume as there should have been. It made the motor's rudimentary "computer" run in safe mode.
I spent a bunch of money fixing things trying to track down the problem, when it could have been a simple $20 part and an hour of wrenching.
 

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Thanks for that bit of info Eric, it might come in handy in the future. Mine is an 1988 johnson 48hp 2 stroke I believe. Are johnson and evinrude made by the same people? Or use to? I seen they are stopping production on evinrude.
Yep, BRP purchased that OMC line a few years back and Evinrude is getting the axe. Too bad.... OMC was the parent company to Johnson/Evinrude.

Jon, your engine is very similar to Eric and mine. I have a 81 Evinrude 70 2-Stroke. Many of the same parts(with minor variations) exist between the models. Pick up a repair manual. Marineengine.com is a great place for parts. I am planning to do the water pump and thermostat. I don't know when the last time they were done, so I plan on doing it before the summer trip to the Ohio. Also, sounds like you got a good wrenching buddy! Forgot an easy one, change the gear oil from the lower unit gearcase. It probably needs it. Take a pic of the oil that comes out, if it is milky then you will need seals. Water intrusion to the lower unit totally terrible, but you would need to address it.

Don't forget about the boat re-naming ceremony. This will appease the Greek God Poseidon...

https://www.discoverboating.com/resources/ceremony-for-renaming-your-boat

Matt
 

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Jon from Indiana
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Discussion Starter #71
Alright guys i will bring my boating stuff back here instead of the gathering page.

Soooo just wanted to let you guys all know that I can rope start my motor now! I just did it a few times. Its actually pretty easy and I recommend everyone learn and pratice how to do it before the time to actually need it arrives.

I will tell you guys how i did it later tonight! Im gettin ready for a much needed haircut!
 

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Jon from Indiana
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Discussion Starter #72 (Edited)
Morning guys. So I'm sure alot of you may already know how to do this but I still wanted to share.

So what I did was first prime it. There is a red lever on the solenoid. Turn it from run to manual (from right to left) then put my rope with a knot in the notch on the fly wheel and wrap it around acouple times. Pull untill flywheel starts to get tight (compression) then pull. Do that about twice. Key is off this part.

Next move red lever back to run from manual. Turn over key and repeat rope pulling procedure. I was trying for about 5 minutes before my buddy suggested pumping the gas bulb and also lifting the idle lever. As soon as I did that if fired up after two pulls.

He pointed out if i still had alil juice that i could just prime it with the key by pushing it in acouple of times and by pass the first step of a manual prime.

Now this will definitely be a last resort option but I feel good that I know how to do it now. Having the second battery and being able to switch to it will be my easiest option. I will also keep a pair of jumper cables handy untill I can get a jumper pack.
 

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Jon from Indiana
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Discussion Starter #73
Whats up guys, more questions.

Im thinking about location for my onboard charger. I was reading the manual (yeah im that guy) and it recommended not in an inclosed area. It also said to try and keep it away from the batteries if possible.

My couple of thoughts were either over by my gas tank (which probably isn't a good idea either) or under my steering console.

Just wanted your guys thoughts and opinions or even ideas or what you have done.

Another question is about using an extension cord. It strongly suggests not to use one but if so to use the correct one. Then it supplys me this chart that I'm not quite following. (I didn't realize there are different ones) Any thoughts on that? Is it a big deal? I can post a picture of the chart if needed.

Thanks in advance for all input.
 

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Eric from Traders Point, Indiana USA
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For your boat I would mount the charger under the helm if possible, provided that it doesn't hit your knee while driving lol!

I don't know the exact gauge of extension cord required exactly. I would think a 12 gauge extension cord should get the job done.
 

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Jon from Indiana
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Discussion Starter #76
Yup your correct Steve. I guess I was half out of it the first time I looked the chart over.馃う鈥嶁檪锔廻aha now I just need to fig out how long mine are.

Eric I was actually going to raise that up some so I shouldn't be kneeing it. Right now I'm all hunched over the wheel when im going and its so uncomfortable.

Thanks guys
 

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Use the recommended length/AWG for your motor. The reason that you need the correct size of wire is due to heat from voltage drop. The current draw will be the same regardless, but when the voltage drop happens the current will continue on down the wire causing lots of heat. This is a DC issue. AC current is a totally different beast. See, if you take an electron as ask it to travel the speed of light down a tiny wire, you'll just get a fire. The wire will just act like a resistor. Here is an analogy I found off the innerwebs that may help you conceptualize it:

Voltage Drop - Definition
Wires carrying current always have inherent resistance, or impedance, to current flow. Voltage drop is defined as the amount of voltage loss that occurs through all or part of a circuit due to impedance.​
A common analogy used to explain voltage, current and voltage drop is a garden hose. Voltage is analogous to the water pressure supplied to the hose. Current is analogous to the water flowing through the hose. And the inherent resistance of the hose is determined by the type and size of the hose - just like the type and size of an electrical wire determines its resistance.​

Don't worry if you don't totally understand it. But, if your garden hose has too much water flowing through it in relation to its diameter, it will burst. Too much resistance in the hose will cause a rupture. Same thing with current and wires. Except conductors get hot and cause a fire. Just follow the charts. The best thing is to use the correct size fuse/breaker, correct size wire, and keep your wires as short as possible.
 

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As a general rule your extension cord should be only as long as the normal need requires. If a 10 footer works that is what you should get. When you just use a long cord because that is what you have, you are allowing voltage drop caused by the longer length. Sometimes that may be required but it is not ideal.

Also I would not recommend a wire gauge less than a number 12 AWG (American wire gauge).

Now I would suggest the charger be mounted close to the batteries location. These charger wires that connect to the batteries are usually not small. Often they are two wires (going to one battery) with an insulation coating on them. So if you have a couple, like with a two battery bank, it may not be easy to hide the wires if you have to route them very far. So, I would say mount the charger as close to the batteries as is feasible and bundle your wires so they are out of the way. Keep in mind that these on board chargers are completely water proof.

One final note. I have had a 2 bank charger on my 2070 for 2 years not and still have not attached it anywhere. Partly because I just haven't decided exactly where I want it and mostly because I just haven't finished procrastinating yet. Procrastinating is an acquired art form and only the best can extend projects out for several years. No applause needed.

Tom
 

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Jon, I went back and re-read a few posts. Then you say it was recommended not to have the charger close to the batteries, is that from the book on your new charger or something else. Of course the purpose is to prevent any sparks around gas vapors or vapors from a charging battery. both are highly ignitable.

My thoughts are that your charger is a sealed unit that is weather and water proof. And if it is not in a closed compartment it should make no difference at all.

Anyway just curious where you were reading that.

Tom
 
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