Boat trailer bunk pads

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Mr.T, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Does anyone here use those nylon pads that you attach to your trailer bunks that are supposed to make the boat slide on and off the trailer easier? Do they work?

    I'm thinking they might make my job a bit easier when loading and unloading the boat by myself. I can't back the trailer too far or else it's impossible to get the boat centered on the bunks in the rear -- but that leaves me with the problem of trying to winch it up the carpet bunks, which is a bit of a chore.
     
  2. Cattracker16

    Cattracker16 New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    Wilton Iowa
    Well i have carpeted on my bunks also, It helps me alot when i have some1 other than myself putting in and taking out the boat. But I always back the trailer in for the wife, so i back trailer in til my tires of the truck hit the water, that makes it so the carpets are wet on the bunk, if that don't do it i always have the wife back the trailer in a little bit farther so i can snug up the front of boat against the trailer. Thats what works for myself w/ a deep V boat.
     

  3. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I know of a couple people who have them on their trailers and they absolutely do make the boat slide off easier. So much so that you do not want to unhook your boat from the trailer until you are in the water and ready to launch. My one hunting buddy bought a used boat and he didn't know the bunks had the nylon on them and he just unhooked his boat as he had done with all his previous boats. Well, you guessed it. It slid right off of the trailer and onto the ramp. Luckilly it was only a 15' jon and there were 4 other hunters at the ramp to help us lift the boat back onto the trailer.
     
  4. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Marty I was in the same situation as you and these old arms aren't as strong as they once were. I was down at b-pro one day and they had the glids on sale so I bought me a set.
    Now a word of advice. Don't even think about unhooking until you are ready to go in the water. They are that slick. I can run up in the trailer and have to leave the boat in gear until I hook the bow eye strap up.
    My next step is to get me a quick catch that will latch when it hits it.
    By all means get you a set it is well worth it.
    You will have some say it will indent the bottom of the boat but that is BS because my has been on two years and no indention yet.
     
  5. ears

    ears New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    *Required*
    Spraying silicone on the carpet will work as well. I do mine about once a year and they are like ice. I have also seen vinyl lattice from home depot used for a little less money.
     
  6. Catfish Fever

    Catfish Fever New Member

    Messages:
    4,548
    State:
    Wside, Mil
    The last time I re-did my bunks on the Toon trailer I put carpet on, as mentioned, I first back it in enough to wet them all the way, then pull out to where I want to load it, it generally stops a couple of inches from the stop and can be winched in the rest.
    A friend of mine re-bunked his and left the carpet off, he said when the two by's are wet, they are plenty slick enough. He said the wood last longer too, as it dries out quicker than with the carpet on them. That's my plan for this summer, replace the bunks, with treated(green) lumber, and no carpet.
     
  7. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Thanks for the replies -- I hadn't thought about using silicone. Not sure whether I'll go that route or add the non-stick pads, but I think I'll do something for sure...
     
  8. Tulcat

    Tulcat New Member

    Heed the warning on not unhooking from the trailer if you add these. Several months ago I had to replace the bunk boards, and while researching it on the Internet I ran into some stories about people adding the nylon pads and having their boats slide off the trailer onto the ramp the first time they tried them out.
     
  9. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Good point.

    I always wait until after the boat is in the water and the engine is started before I unhook the winch strap -- there's nothing more fun than trying to get a won't-start boat back on the trailer after it's floated away from it...

    My bigger worry is when I have folks "helping" me put the boat in -- I always have to make sure I keep an eye on what I'm doing *and* what they're doing as we get ready to launch.
     
  10. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Just go to a 2500 lb winch and its not a problem unless you have a barge. I put one on my 20ft war-eagle and its a breeze to winch the boat up.
    Pete
     
  11. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I tried the silicone spray on the bunks today.

    Worked slicker than a whistle - boat went right up on the trailer as easy as can be.

    Thanks for the suggestion!
     
  12. jeffrobodeen

    jeffrobodeen New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    West Virginia
    Once again , more great info!
     
  13. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    I agree that the nylon pads are waaaay better than carpet.

    Last year I found that Rubbermaid produces the very same nylon in a "Commercial" cutting board (15 X 20") for about $11.00. You can cut it on a saw, counter sink the mounting holes and have a complete set for far less than pre-made pads.

    In bigger cities, I've seen the Rubbermaid boards at several stores, but around here Sam's Club is the only source and the model number is: 70-9789-71 ... "Commercial - restaurant quality" on the label.

    One tip you may find useful ... you can heat this stuff with a heat gun or a torch (paint remover fan tip) and bend it. I taper the last 6 inches of the rear bunk end from 2" to about 1 1/4 (makes a short angled ramp), screw the strip to the short end (it's now pointing straight up), then heat it and bend it forward over the bunk before putting in the rest of the screws. That way, there are NO sharp edges to catch your hull.

    The average cutting board will NOT work, by the way. Try to cut it on a saw and all you do is melt it to the saw blade. The Rubbermaids are like sawing wood.