boat size for the missouri and mississippi

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by skinner, Jun 9, 2009.

  1. skinner

    skinner New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    missouri
    I want to get a boat someday i have heard that in the Mississippi you want atleast a 18 footer, but want about the missouri it dont look like is that rough.




    thanx
    Skinnert
     
  2. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    I've heard stories of people using smaller boats. Myself, I wouldn't be comfortable in anything less than 18'...but that's just me. Don't let the Missouri fool you...it moves right along. If you get dumped in the channel, chances are you won't get out on your own.
     

  3. DWB

    DWB Member

    Messages:
    984
    State:
    Missouri
    It all depends on the type of boat and how you intend to use it. Equally important are the beam of your boat and the freeboard. You are going to want a sturdy, steady platform with adequate freeboard to venture out on the big rivers (the Missouri or the Mississippi).

    18 feet is probably a good rule of thumb but that is not to say that you would not be safe in a boat a little shorter, say 16 feet, with a nice wide beam and a lot of freeboard.

    My advice--Go as large as you can afford and you will not be sorry.
     
  4. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    I used to runn on the Mo river with a 16 ft alum bass tracker. I now got a 17 ft tracker alum and do just fine. Know a few who runn it in 14 fters. Biggest thing is just respect the river and stay out of things that can flip ya or sink ya. If you want to anchor in hard current a 18 to 20 is better. I dont anchor out in the main channel often in the Mo river I tend to fish dikes with slots and have old piles and stuf to tie off to.
     
  5. JoeFriday

    JoeFriday New Member

    Messages:
    127
    State:
    Indep. missouri
    i have a 17.5 ft Lowe and it works really well. Never had a problem ever.
     
  6. moriver

    moriver New Member

    Messages:
    416
    State:
    Missouri
    My first river boat was a 1648 Lowe with a 25HP. Great boat but I wanted a little more room and weight. The boat I just finished putting together is a 1754 Tracker with a 40HP. My wants in a boat are different than most though. I wanted a boat that gives a little big boat feel but still handles like a small boat. The ramps around KC can be rough. I wanted something I could move on the trailer by hand if it was crossed and was light enough that if the trailer fell in a hole on a ramp it was lite enough to pick up. I am hard on a boat. I beach it and park on the rocks and a heavy boat does not like that sometimes. I wanted something that did not draw a bunch of water also. I now have the boat I think fills those needs or does for the time being. I am sure the wind will switch and I will find a different boat I cant live without.
    A few things to keep in mind about the Missouri.
    • I you are going to anchor in the current have a knife to cut the rope. The feeling of a tree climbing your anchor rope is something that will move you.
    • Do not come between the current and a fixed object(pier,logs or wing dam) if the current pushes you into something you are in big trouble. Aproach from down current when ever possible.
    • Go ready for the worst, you are going to be on your own most of the time.
    • Use your PFD..........
    And last of all have fun and take it in.
     
  7. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    I use a 1754 Blind Duck w/75 hp. and have had no problems. I was going to get an 18' until I measured the length of boat and trailer--wouldn't fit well in where I had to park it. I normally avoid anchoring in the current--I don't like having to try to keep one eye upstream and one downstream where my lines are.
     
  8. sjohn58

    sjohn58 Guest

    I have a 1998 165 pro, I have not had the courage to put it on the big Mo.
    Manly be cause, I have never been on the river before.
    I saw a lot of smaller boats on there when I fish from the bank, maybe some day.
    :sad2:
    Here and old picture
     
  9. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    Go out with someone who knows the river when its down and the rock dikes are out. Then go out by yourself a few times in the day learn 10 miles of river well. You will get a feel for it. Then ya get too relaxed after 2 years and ground yaself on a bar @ 4 in the morn lol. I did it:embarassed:. Still runn the river. Biggest thing is dont get swept against a dike, pile line, or log jamb where the current could push ya down. Thats where getting to know the river when its down low comes in. I know it well 10 miles in my area up and down river. But still learn more every trip. Learning how to read current is ya best friend on that river. Will keep ya out a lot of trouble.
     
  10. Dredge

    Dredge Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Arnold,Missouri
    I have an 18 footer with a 40 horse jet.I fish the Missouri and Mississippi all the time.I don't anchor in heavy current.Like most of these guys,I fish dikes and strcture.My two main concerns are barges swamping me,and Asian carp slapping me.Keep your eyes open and practice safty first,you should be O.K.
     
  11. buckethead

    buckethead New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    arkansas
    Hello,

    It would have to be at least an 18 footer for me, that is what I have with a 90/65 Jet, but I still dont feel compfortable enough to head for the Mississippi, my buddy has a 16.5 Tracker and he fishe's it, certain times of the year,later on in the summer,
    Years ago, I was fishing at Lake Mansfield, in Texas, up by the dam, catching Stripers, I had been there the day before by myself, no problem, so I got a couple of buddy's and went back, we anchored close to the discharge and started catching fish, before I noticed we had drifted close to the discharge, the anchor was not holding, the current looks like it is moveing straight out but there is also an undertow,just lucky for us that the ""Ole Johnson"" started first time (((LMAO))) we all had to go home and change our underwear ((((LOL))):embarassed:
    All of these guys gave you good advice,main thing is to be safe, those rivers change every day, almost. I fish in small rivers the Current and Black, but they change too, after a big rain ,a hole that was there yesterday might be full of logs today,

    cliff
     
  12. skinner

    skinner New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    missouri
    sounds like for both rivers its best to have at least a 18 footer. ( or 2 boats ) Thanx again
    skinner
     
  13. skinner

    skinner New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    missouri
    meant thanx skinner
     
  14. Andy52

    Andy52 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,463
    State:
    Winfield, Mo.
    Lots of good advice in all the post. I've had several boats over the years that I have used on the Mississippi. The one I have now is the best I've used. It's a 18'6" Alweld with a 74" beam. It has a high transom and I have a 90hp yamaha jet drive mounted on it. It's a stable platform and I like the jet drive, no prop or lower unit damage. Like others in the post I think beam is as, if not more important then length. A 16' to 17' with a wide beam would do fine, a 18 to 20 would be better. Last week I watched 3 guys come up the river in a narrow beam 14 footer, sporting about a 10 hp. It scared me just to see them in it. One last thing when boating on either the Mississippi or the Missouri learn to use the current not fight it. You will be a much better boater and a better fisherman.
     
  15. jmanion8

    jmanion8 New Member

    Messages:
    424
    State:
    Kansas
    for running lines we usually just use a little 14 footer with a 5 horse johnson...just troll down into the holes to check/set the lines and pop the motor on to get back up. this works since i do most of my rod and rell fishing from the bank. i'd definitely look into something bigger, along the 18 foot range if i had the money. best of luck to ya!
     
  16. Terry Day

    Terry Day New Member

    Messages:
    298
    State:
    Parkville, Missouri
    I have a 18' Polar Craft with a center console. It works great on the Missouri, not sure about the mississippi. One thing I always do, is have a really sharp knife laying on the deck by the anchor rope. Anchors and rope are cheap, wouldn't want to loose the boat or something more valuable, like ME! Good luck!
     
  17. DWB

    DWB Member

    Messages:
    984
    State:
    Missouri

    True, a quick release cleat on the bow can be even quicker than a knife. And if you have a buoy on your line you wont even loose your rope and anchor.
     
  18. Dredge

    Dredge Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Arnold,Missouri
    I saw a post somewhere that said buy one of those cheap bouncing balls kids use.Tie it to the end of your anchor rope.If you have to cut the line,it'll float so you can retrieve your anchor after the danger passes.
     
  19. 1mickymoo

    1mickymoo New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Edgerton, Kansas
    I've fished the MO with my 16 ft 20 hp jon, works fine if there's no barges, get behind a dike, quick. hot maps pro or platinum shows the dikes. And the real anchor balls are well worth the money, jmho.
     
  20. Iablue

    Iablue New Member

    Messages:
    91
    State:
    IOWA
    All good advise! I use a 14 ft Alumacraft with 5' beam. 25 hp Evinrude. The controls and steering are up close to the front. I was basically raised on a river and fish the Mississippi a lot along with some smaller rivers in my area. As much as I have been on the rivers, I am carefull all the time, with caffine being the strongest liquid aboard. Respect the rivers, cause they will KILL YA and just keep on rolling:sad2: Oh I forgot to mention, adult beverages are consumed when telling the truth about those fish when off the water:wink: