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I have a 1969 kenner ski barge. the hull is in great shape so i want to make it my flat cat boat and my question is about paint and a little 12'' fiberglass repair. Paint- what type,how do i apply and were can i get some. Repair-what type and were can i get some

ACE S.

PS:i will get pics later today.
 

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I have a 1969 kenner ski barge. the hull is in great shape so i want to make it my flat cat boat and my question is about paint and a little 12'' fiberglass repair. Paint- what type,how do i apply and were can i get some. Repair-what type and were can i get some

ACE S.

PS:i will get pics later today.
Depends on what you want to spend. Paint is 25 a quart to 350 gallon.
The first thing you should do is figure out how much you are willing to invest in a restoration.
I can tell you that a boat that old (40 years old) has some issues you can't see.
I would be really be surprised if the transom and stringers don't have rot.

All of this plays into how much you are willing to spend on a restoration and really what you are calling a restoration.
You can drop 3 grand in a restore real quick and that is doing it yourself.

I'll have atleast that in a 16 footer but it's a full restore. Just like a frame off with a car.
The boat is down to the point just like it was when it was popped from the mold.

From my experience, I wouldn't put alot into it unless I was going all the way.
Going all the way doesn't mean you can get what you got in it back out unfortunately but you know what you got and you know it's safe for the family.
Pick the right old hull and getting your money back out of a restoration isn't a problem.
Mine is 30 years old. I've had offers sight unseen for more then I'll have in it material wise.
Part of that is based on the quality of work I do. The other part is the type and make of boat.
 

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I buy alot from boatbuilder central. All of my epoxy and most of my marine plywood,foam, etc comes from them.
Better sources for paint like Jamestown distributors.
Jamestown sells complete lines of different boat paints.
For 39.95 Jamestown will give you a catalogue of over 1000 pages of boat building and boating supplies.
You also get free product technical support and free shipping on any regular ground shipping for a year.
That in itself will save a bundle on a restoration.
Easily on this boat alone I'll save 250-300 in shipping.
 

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Probally the best piece of advice I have for anyone dealing with these old boats or new boats for that matter is that they rot from underneath not the topside.
With that in mind if you have a floor with a soft spot, there had to be long term wet conditions underneath the floor (most cases). What that means is that everything else below the floor has been exposed to the same conditions including the transom.
Boats flex. Transoms flex. It's not uncommon to see some hairline cracking around transoms.
You see boats that sit out in the yard all the time. They'll have little bit of water pooled in the bilge at the transom that doesn't drain out.
Hair line cracks, water absorption.

Folks, fiberglass "rots" The way this comes about is through wicking.
gel coat chips are one way this happens. Water gets to the fibers of the fiberglass and it runs those fibers through the hull. That is wicking. The glass becomes water soaked and delamination can occur.
Some people attempt and do get these hulls dried out but it takes months and a dry place.
The average eye won't pick up on a water soaked fiberglass hull. Sometimes I can tell without being invasive. Depends on the type and design of the boat.
One of the key signs is to get into the bilge where you have bare exposed fiberglass and resin.
You start seeing black spots or an black oily residue on the glass, it's got some water damage.
The black residue is a chemical reaction to the water in the glass and it's forced out.

On the boat I'm restoring the problem started when the owner noticed a soft spot in the floor.
In the link I provide you can clearly see what that one soft spot in the floor has led to.
Complete removal of the transom and 75% of one layer of glass on the transom which basicly crumbled from water.
It lead to removal of all the stringers which were rotten from stem to stern.
If I had patched this boat up and run it, I would have wound up cracking or breaking the hull. The support mechanism was shot. I've got this hull to the point that I can take it off the trailer by myself.
FIBERGLASS IS NOT WATERPROOF neither is the polyester resin holding it together.

Back to hairline cracks. I evaluated a 21 foot Carolina Skiff a week or so ago for someone.
No wood in these boats so no problems ? Wrong. To be short and sweet, the boat is ruined.
It's wrapped up with hairline cracks all in the floor and around the transom. Best I can figure through weighing she's toting about 800 pounds of water as a passenger. This is a bilgeless boat. Flat out ruined. He could buy another hull for about what it will cost him to have it fixed.
Carolina skiffs particularly the large ones flex alot. The flex leads to cracking over time. This sucker is wrapped up in cracks.
Why do these boats flex so much? They took the wood out of them. You can't replace the strength of a sheet of plywood without adding a ton of weight or going with lightweight space age exotic composites. The floor structure is the backbone of a small boat.
My link below.

http://www.catfish1.com/forums/f388/sole-replacement-138568-7.html
 
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