Boat Question?

Discussion in 'LOCAL PENNSYLVANIA TALK' started by ste6168, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. ste6168

    ste6168 New Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I was wondering what you guys thought of this. I found a pretty good deal on an '04 14' Lowe Jon Boat w/ 5hp Motor. I was wondering if you thought this would be too small of a boat for the 3 rivers? the boat is rated for up to a 20hp motor, so if the motor would be the main problem I could always upgrade down the road.

    I have saw people out on the river with what looks like 14ft'rs and 9.9's and they seemed to do just fine. I dont care about speed, I just want something that can get me out there to fish. If a 14ft w/ 5hp is too small, what would you suggest I look for that would be a good size for the 3 rivers, yough, and some of the smaller lakes around?
     
  2. Jollymon

    Jollymon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,619
    State:
    Wilm .N.C
    my son had a lowe d/w 14ft with a 25 hp that he fished in the ocean,good day he wishes he still had it ,he got married..i don,t know anything about the area u were asking about but the 14 d/w is a nice boat
     

  3. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Seen 14 foot jon boats fishing AR-314 several times.
    That reef is sseveral miles off Atlantic beach. The ocean isn't the worst part of that trip. Navigating the inlet is.
     
  4. DIESELkat

    DIESELkat New Member

    Messages:
    1,931
    State:
    PA
    I just bought a 14 foot SeaArk John boat last week. I wanted the 25 HP outboard that was on it for my cattin boat, but the guy made me a deal too good to pass up on the whole thing, boat, motor, trolling motor, trailer and all. I think we might take it out for a quick channel cat outing this week to test her out and then Im putting my 9.8 Merc on it and selling it. Im guessin this thing is a rocket with a 25 on it. When I brought it home, I stopped at Bob Warren to order a starter paw for it and he looked at me like I was crazy when I told him I had a 25 on a 14 footer:tounge_out:

    A 5 horse should do you just fine on a John boat. I have an OLD (late 50's) 5 horse Johnson that I put on my 16 foot v-hull once and it pushed it pretty decent. No gettin on plane or anything but it moved it pretty well. If you get that motor and find out later that you want more power, you can always get a 15 horse carb for it. The only bad thing about John boats on the river is that there are alot of different widths when it comes to John boats. A friend has one thats nearly as wide as my v-hull and Ive seen them down to so skinny it looks like your ridin a log down the river. Get something that your comfortable with and comfortable IN. It wont be much fun if your worried about the boat all night and cant concentrate on fishin. Good luck.
     
  5. Pennsylvaniacatchaser

    Pennsylvaniacatchaser Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,359
    State:
    Sarver, Pa
    I personally would recommend a deep V hull over a jonboat. I'm not knocking jonboats but if your out in turbulent or rough water I prefer the deep V for protection from getting swamped.
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I know of a man that built a flat bottom center console dory 16 feet long that drove it from Miami to the Bahamas and back. Roughly 80 miles each way.

    Seen pictures of the same 16 foot design making a turn on the SIDE of a huge swell. A deep V would have rolled because of stability issues. It sits on a keel.

    Flat bottoms ride on the surface of waves. Up and over.
    The Deep V's on the other hand are cutting waves or plowing waves.

    Flat bottom ride sucks deep V doesn't.
    Another pro and con between hull design.

    Seakeeping ability is in the design.
    There are plenty of deep V's on the market that are broach prone and only an experienced captain needs the helm in that boat in broach prone conditions.
    On the other hand you have boats both deep V and flat bottom that are difficult to broach even by the inexperienced captain.

    Personally the only boat that makes sense to me is a self bailing cockpit.
    Particularly where you are dealing with waves on a continual basis.

    One thing to consider. There is no hull that is more stable then a flat bottom one. Now you know why barges are flat bottom.

    The famed Simmons Sea Skiff.
    This boat was designed and built in NC for many years. Might as well consider it flat bottom because it's deadrise is minimal. A couple of degrees.
    Built from wood.
    Netters used to paddle and motor these things well offshore commercial fishing. 18-22 foot hulls.
    The high bow and the transom design made the boat up to the task.

    These boats are used around the world today.
    The designer and builder is long dead but the boats are being produced by home builders worldwide and they have an owner's club and a yearly show (gathering)in Southport, NC every year.
    It was a 3 issue feature article step by step build in Wooden Boat magazine in the fall of 2007.

    It's all in a design. Unfortunately for the novice it's very difficult if not impossible to pick out the characteristics of a particular hull while an experienced captain can take the helm and let you know real quick how she'll handle any given situation. It's in the feel.

    An experienced jon boat captain can put one in some bad situations and come out on top.

    The key is not to captain over your head on the lake, river, or ocean.
     
  7. ste6168

    ste6168 New Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    What do you plan to sell the SeaArk, 9.8 Merc, and trailer for? I may be interested... :wink:

    Thanks for the info everyone. We may get the boat after what I have heard here. We'll see though, the old man is VERY slow when it comes to things like this... In the meantime, if any of you know of any good deals around on a 14-16ft boat let me know. I am in the market.
     
  8. VOODOO 1

    VOODOO 1 New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    PA
    Motor is not the problem unless you want to travel around for miles while you are on the water but I would seriously reconsider a jon boat for the river. Sometimes that barge traffic is pretty intense on the mon and some of those guys are a real piece of work and will try to swamp you on purpose. I recommend a deep v with a 20inch transom to be on the safe side. The Mon is tough on a Jon.
     
  9. I agree, the v-hull is better for handling, and the john boat is good for shallow and the flat floor is nice on the inside.:roll_eyes: As long as it floats and you can afford it, it's all that matters. :wink:Oh, and it HAS to catch fish!!!!:smile2:
     
  10. katplayer187

    katplayer187 New Member

    Messages:
    136
    State:
    WEST END-PITTSBURGH,PA
    There was a nice deal in the green sheet this wee if ou can get ahold of one..dnt know if it will be in there next week..just try and get a wide boat this will make up for the boats tryin to swamp you and the barge traffic..I just got a 16ft 6ft wide lowe big jon and I'm sure ill be able to take any river wake..
     
  11. catfish chaser

    catfish chaser New Member

    Messages:
    674
    State:
    miamisburg, oh
    As long as you stay away from high water times. you will be alright
     
  12. daltonweaver3

    daltonweaver3 New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    Not a jon boat, but I just got a 13' Starcraft v-hull with a 6 hp Johnson motor. I took it out on the Allegheny at Freeport Saturday and it did fine as far as motoring upstream and withstanding the boats with their 100 hp motors zooming by.