Boat leak

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by kycatman01, May 24, 2009.

  1. kycatman01

    kycatman01 New Member

    Messages:
    856
    State:
    kentucky
    I have a 14' v bottom aluminum boat. It has a very small leak around a rivot seal. What can I do. Will silocone work?
     
  2. Catfish Pursuit

    Catfish Pursuit New Member

    Messages:
    1,081
    State:
    Missouri
    I had a 14 foot Lowe Jon that had a small crack in a welded seam. I was in a hurry to fish so I just used clear silicone for a temporary fix and it lasted several years so I think it would definately work for a leaky rivet. At least worth a try. I would silicone both sides just to be safe. Chris
     

  3. stoney53

    stoney53 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,377
    State:
    PA
    silicone should work probably not as a permenant fix but like stated could last several years just get the best grade of silicone you can find there is a difference
     
  4. dominoman

    dominoman New Member

    Messages:
    445
    State:
    Dale, Texa
    Cabela's sells a 3M product that works with a propane torch for doing repairs like that. I used it on 2 different riveted boats and it worked great. I have yet to have a repeat leak.
     
  5. Spider

    Spider New Member

    Messages:
    610
    State:
    Hamburg, PA
    Reset the rivet. If you want to go the sealer route, use 3M 5000 Marine Adheasive Sealant.
     
  6. lendog

    lendog New Member

    Messages:
    2,141
    State:
    berks, PA
    get someone to hold a hammer head on the bottom(under side) of the boat at the rivet then from up top hit the rivit, that should make it snug again then some alum. leak fix or something like JB weld should hold it, silicone on the bottom will wear off after some time even just runnin the boat on and off the trailer
     
  7. crclhuk1

    crclhuk1 New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Central, SC
    I have a 21ft.aluminum v-hull and found a small hole in the bottom where it had hit a sharp edged rock, didn't leak too bad, but it leaked. Got this stuff they call JB WET WELD. Its like a dough, you just cut off a small piece and knead it till it changes colors apply all over and around hole, rivet, etc. and let dry. If it is a hole, push some through the hole. After drying you can sand and repaint. It has been over a year and still no water. This is some good stuff---$3.00 at you local wally-world.:cool2:
     
  8. Redneck in a Skiboat

    Redneck in a Skiboat New Member

    Messages:
    200
    State:
    South Caro
    I agree the others, if you can tighten the rivet it'll be the best fix. I used a marine expoxy on a hole in mine and it didn't leak. They have it a lowes where all the sealants and glue are located. JB weld is calcuim based and will begin to expand and contract as it gets wet and dries. It will work for long time, but its not a permanant fix.
     
  9. TensawRiver

    TensawRiver New Member

    Messages:
    30
    State:
    South Alabama
    I found this stuff called Dura Fix while reading in the iboats forum awhile back. The rods are alittle more that what JB Weld or Silicone would cost but it's a neat product that once you have it you could really do alot around the house and boat..check it out and watch the video.

    http://durafix.com/index.html?alum.mgs
     
  10. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I bought 2-1/2 pounds of aluminum "welding" rods to play around with.
    You are talking about a melt/flow temperature around 720-740 degrees.
    That temperature range is considered soldering, not welding.

    I wouldn't use it below the waterline. Definately not.
    Filling in an unused screw hole on the gunnel? Yea it's alright for that.

    It's basicly pot metal or what we call monkey metal. It's got a bunch of zinc in it. What happens to the zincs on our outboard motors? They corrode away.
    The zincs on an engine are sacrificial annodes. Your aluminum welding rods will act the same way with the zinc in them.

    If it were mine, before I contaminated the metal with JB weld or silicone (patches) I'd fix the problem with some real aluminum welding.
    You aren't talking about a whole lot of money for something that will fix it rather then patch it.
     
  11. TensawRiver

    TensawRiver New Member

    Messages:
    30
    State:
    South Alabama
    Thanks Mark J for the info on that. I am not a welder so I really didn't know but thought that they could be used alot around the house and stuff and maybe on boats just not below the waterline. Again thanks a bunch...
     
  12. RiverBuggy4x4

    RiverBuggy4x4 New Member

    Messages:
    589
    State:
    Indiana
    we had a leak on our boat and we used fiberglass mat and resin:big_smile:
     
  13. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Those aluminum welding rods are pretty cool and you can fix some things with them as long as it's not structural in nature but they have a pretty big learning curve in order to get anywhere close to the proficiency you see on the videos. It's nowhere as simple as it looks unless you a pretty darn good brazer.
    One of the biggest problems with using them on a aluminum boat is heat soaking that thin aluminum. You have to have heat on it for too a long a time to heat the area to be "welded" You wind up heat soaking a large area of aluminum and "oil canning" it if you aren't careful. In other words your 50 fix fix just became a several hundred repair or worse feasibly unrepairable.

    Anytime you heat aluminum you are changing the molecular structure of the metal to a pretty good degree.
    Nothing more disheartneing then one of those oh s$%t moments when you see a a foot square of pontoon or boat bottom just oil can right before your eyes because you got too much heat in it.