blues relating to baitfish????

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by catcrazed, Jan 2, 2009.

  1. catcrazed

    catcrazed New Member

    Messages:
    575
    State:
    ohio
    Just another one of those things that is driving me nuts that I can't figure out and thought id ask for some more .02 from my bros. Okay, here it is. I know that everyone always saids "find the bait, and find the blues". This is what I don't understand about that. here lately we have finally got some current and we have been catching nice size blues in deep water out in the current. I just can't believe that in say 40-60 feet of water on the bottom there are shad or other bait fish fighting the current. Sense we have finally got current back we have been able to find the shad in the creeks again thank goodness. Evan though we normally use skips in the winter its nice to be able to find the little buggers again. anyways, where we find the shad there is never anything around on our graph. I just don't believe the blues are up in the still water creeks. We have tried it before where the shad are at and struck out, then move out into deep water in the river with high current and what do you know. We start catching them. Im not saying I disagree with the saying but it sure doesnt apply to the fish we have been catching the past 3 years. I mean we turn up the sensitivity on our lowrance to see if there is bait down in the deep water and there just isnt. Its not really affecting our fishing trips but I was just curious if anyone else has thought this before. I guess this question only applies to river fishing!!
     
  2. healthydrink

    healthydrink New Member

    Messages:
    152
    State:
    OKLAHOMA
    That is a good question I don't know. I have found schools of Blues and no shad around. Maybe they already ate them up, I hope someone clears this up. It is a quality question that I have pondered also.
     

  3. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    Maybe the blues in your river are feeding on the chill-shocked shad that are slowly sinking in the current. Generally, the smaller shad have a problem around 45 degrees and will chill and sink. The larger shad seem to survive lower temperatures.

    In any case, you seem to have already figured it out... catch the shad then go look for the Blues. :smile2: