Bluegill as tablefare

Discussion in 'Bluegill Fishing' started by janzaldo, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. janzaldo

    janzaldo New Member

    Messages:
    4,173
    State:
    South Gate, Cal
    Hello, was just wondering if bluegills are good eating. If so how do you prepare them? Do you folks fillet bluegills? Your post will be greatly appreciated.

    Jaime
     
  2. upncomincatfishking

    upncomincatfishking New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Cheviot Ohio
    MY STEPFATHER GO'S OUT AND COMES HOME WITH A FIVE GALLON BUCKET OF EM AND FILLETS EM.THEY'RE EXCELLENT TO EAT ONE OF MY FAVORITE.OR YOU CAN JUST CUT THE HEAD OFF THEN SCALE EM WITH A KNIFE AND GUT EM THEN ROLL EM UP IN SOME TIN FOIL WIT VEGGIES AND PUT EM IN THE OVEN AND TEY'RE GOOD TO.(WATCH FOR BONES)
     

  3. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I like to fillet mine ,then roll in cornmeal/flour mixture seasoned to my taste they are one of the best eating panfish out there .
     
  4. blkhawkdwn

    blkhawkdwn New Member

    Messages:
    169
    State:
    Clarksville, Tennessee
    there are several ways inwhich to prepare bluegill. I usually butteryfly my gills all depended on the size.


    Take an egg beat it and add 1/4 cup milk , salt and pepper then dip the blue gill in this and batter it with cornmeal and drop into hot grease til golden brown, hook urself up some hot grits and fried cornbread and enjoy.
     
  5. Ghost River

    Ghost River New Member

    Messages:
    466
    State:
    Carolina
    Personally they are my favorite fish to eat. Scale them, cut off the head, bread them in cornmeal, salt and pepper, and pan fry. Serve with deep fried potatoes, loaf bread, ketchup on the side and one of those coors lights that's so cold it makes your hand hurt to get it out of the cooler. There ain't nothn better onthe bank of the river when the sun is going down.
     
  6. chuck99

    chuck99 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Georgia
    Crappie then bluegill (bream) as far as taste goes. Bass are way down the list, for me. I keep only hand size and above for eating, for bait use, almost any size. To eat, scale, gut, cut the head off. Rinse well. Salt, pepper, roll in salt, pepper, corn meal/flour mix. Then deep fry. when they float, they are done. Use your fingers to get the meat off the bone. Get the meat off the bones for kids. Fry's and cole slaw, and hush puppies.
     
  7. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Fried bluegill is the next best thing to a plate of fried Spot for me.
    The thing about freshwater fish and taste is that the taste differs from different areas and bodies of water.
    Now I love a Mattamuskeet bass better then from anywhere else I've tried.
     
  8. Indigo Flats

    Indigo Flats Member

    Messages:
    382
    State:
    Lancaster,
    Not only does the taste differ from different bodies of water but time of the year changes the taste in ponds. My fish have a much better taste in the spring and fall than in the middle of summer.
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Never thought about it but yea our ponds produce a varying taste.
     
  10. janzaldo

    janzaldo New Member

    Messages:
    4,173
    State:
    South Gate, Cal
    Thanks for your responses to my post. One thing I have learned BOC members have excellent taste.
    I had my wonderful memories catching bluegill at a local park pond. As a mamter of fact that is the first fish i ever caught.
    I was reading the fish report for my erea and this resevoir called Pudingstone in Pomona,Ca the bluegill and crappie are begining to bite. I have caught big blue gill as big as my hand or bigger with this knot on the head just the prettiest colors.

    Jaime
     
  11. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P
    Bluegills are the only freshwater fish I eat. I cut thier heads off and scale them. Season it up and deep fry it. I love it!
     
  12. Gordhawk

    Gordhawk New Member

    Messages:
    1,378
    State:
    Iowa
    Jaime,
    A Bluegill is the best tasting fish there is,as far as I'm concerned. I fillet mine,and then dip them in a egg & milk mixture and I use a breading made from crushed crackers. Get your oil to 325-350 degrees,and cook until they are floating then remove from oil and enjoy. Baked beans,cole slaw,and potato salad and you got a meal fit for a KING!
    Glenn
     
  13. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    In my life, I've eaten more sunfish (bluegill, longear, redear and green) than any other kind of fish. I think that sunfish out of clean water is one off the best tasting fish there are. I fish for all kinds of fish, but when it comes to keeping and eating, it's hard to beat sunfish. I usually filet them. If scaling and beheading them, scoring the sides will make a lot of the bones kinda disappear when frying them real hot. Cooking them in foil with onion and wild mushrooms is also a good way to go.
     
  14. TnShooter

    TnShooter New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    E. Tennessee
    I'd say they are on the top of my list for best erating.
    I fillet mine, the same as you do crappie. I too
    only keep hand size or bigger for eating.
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    There are lots of ways to cook bream, and even more than one way to fry them. I differ a little bit from Gordhawk in my preferred method of frying. I like my boneless fillets just barely cooked through, and obviously, a thin fillet will cook through much quicker than a thick fillet. But, I want the cornmeal to be the same golden color when done, regardless of whether I've cooked the fillet slow or fast. That means the thinner the fillet, the hotter I get the grease. I don't ever time myself cooking any kind of fish, but if I had to use a timer, I think I'd start with smoking hot grease and leave the fillet in for about 45 seconds. Then check the fillet and adjust grease temperature and/or cooking time as needed.