blue catfish

Discussion in 'LOCAL SOUTH CAROLINA TALK' started by skiff1, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. skiff1

    skiff1 New Member

    Messages:
    210
    State:
    south caro
    what is the average life span of a blue catfish?
     
  2. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    "...what is the average life span of a blue catfish?..."

    No one knows.

    There is very little research on blue catfish in the wild. There are blue catfish that have been aged in the Carolinas as old as 25 years-old. Once a blue catfish reaches the 8-10 pound range there are few, if any, predators except for man.

    Like any wild animal they succumb to disease, injury, and infections.
     

  3. skiff1

    skiff1 New Member

    Messages:
    210
    State:
    south caro
    being that said do you think they pose a threat to waterees crappie or bass population being they have not been in there for a long time (blues)
     
  4. nevets91

    nevets91 New Member

    Messages:
    604
    State:
    rock hill south carolina
    ive always thought they have had an affect on the striper population in the last few years here. since we started catchin blues up in cedar creek in the spring the stripers really dwindled out up there.
     
  5. Zero

    Zero New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    SC
    They don't have any predators except us, I think you'd be surprised how old a big ol unstressed unpressured fish in a healthy lake could live. I would love a answer from the DNR.
     
  6. katman#1

    katman#1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,209
    State:
    South Carolina
    I have heard 30 plus years
     
  7. mudfishmusic

    mudfishmusic New Member

    Messages:
    326
    State:
    South Carolina
    Any time you introduce a new species there has to be an impact on the existing ecosystem. Make that a new dominant predator with no real threat of it's on and you've got a recipe for real change and quick. As recently as the 80's the Santee system was full of white bass and striped bass. Go there now and try to catch anything other than white perch, fatheads, and blues and you'll see how this works.
     
  8. katman#1

    katman#1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,209
    State:
    South Carolina
    the crappie on wateree are already showing signs of being hurt from the white perch an blue catfish the longer the blues are here the more crappie eggs get eat in the spring
     
  9. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    "....do you think they pose a threat to waterees crappie or bass population..."

    Nope.

    Lake Chicamaugua in Tennessee is an example of a lake that has a thriving population of very large blue catfish, bass, and crappie. It does not have white perch.

    As for white perch making an impact, I have not seen any study that shows their impact. I hear crappie fishermen say, "since the white perch arrived we don't catch crappie like we once did". I hear the same thing said about white perch wiping out white bass populations. Again, there seems to be a timeline match betweem the arrival of white perch and the decline of certain species, but I have not seen any scientific proof or even research on the topic.
     
  10. stumphumper

    stumphumper New Member

    Messages:
    78
    State:
    Ladson SC
    Yes they will...and DO have a major impact!!! Just look at what the F'ing flatheads have done to the redbreast populations in the rivers of the SE!
     
  11. Zero

    Zero New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    SC
    Also I think the white perch have had more of an impact on the white bass and crappie than the blues will or do. It used to be you could go out and find a school of 1-3 lb white bass busting shad on a shallow point and catch your limit on anything white or shiny. Now all the guys I know that fish Wateree say they haven't caught one in a long time.

    Fortunately the blues love eating those white perch! Hopefully they'll put them in check! That's the real problem IMO.
     
  12. katman#1

    katman#1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,209
    State:
    South Carolina
    I also agree on that
     
  13. katman#1

    katman#1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,209
    State:
    South Carolina
    you dont think it hurts the population when the blues feed on the crappie eggs in the spring I think to fix the crappie population they need to change the creel limit to 20 fish an put a size limit on them because between the white perch an the blues an then the fisherman the crappie dont have a chance
     
  14. skiff1

    skiff1 New Member

    Messages:
    210
    State:
    south caro
    yea i think these perch are gonna be our problem kinda like the carp else where i wish more of you fellows would fish with them they make a great bait
     
  15. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    "....Just look at what the F'ing flatheads have done to the redbreast populations in the rivers of the SE..."

    That is a good example of blaming an occurance on something just because it occurred in the same time frame.

    The scientific studies in the Cape Fear River showed that redbreast sunfish were not found in any higher concentrations in the stomachs of the flathead catfish than other fish. In some cases they were not found at all.

    "...you dont think it hurts the population when the blues feed on the crappie eggs in the spring..."

    Just curious if that has been shown to happen in a study, or if that is just crappie fishermen talking.

    Lots of things get blamed on other fish, but the real blame may lie with us humans and what we dump into the rivers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  16. steveturner024

    steveturner024 Active Member

    Messages:
    825
    State:
    Illinois
    Name:
    Steve Turner
    I read that the life span of a blue catfish is 20-25 years.
     
  17. slojam

    slojam New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    scarolina
    in all honesty it's well documented what the flathead invasion has done to the bream(especially the redbreast) population in the edisto(presumed bucket stocking).when the bio's (@you know where) consider permits for electroshocking, it's probably gotten a little out of hand..(unless that was rumoured??)egg raiders...yeah,white perch,also well documented..even moving some species of catfish out of traditional spawning areas as well as crappie,sunfish,& true bass.just my humble opinion from friends,what little i've seen,(& even some reliable sources :smile1:.) all about balance . i don't think it always works out for the best(don't think ya'll do either) but it always works out...have a nice day,jim.
     
  18. slojam

    slojam New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    scarolina
    me & a friend were discussin this very same thing the other day(what we dump into the rivers).we don't agree on some things,but he is hardheaded:laugh1: & a much more serious catman than me.(and better)but we did agree on this 100 percent..if the fine folks at the treatment plants that claimed there treated water was perfectly safe(to give back to the river) would drink a glass of it at the weekly staff meetings then we would probably be ok with it too..(other wise tell the truth..)
     
  19. Foxhound

    Foxhound New Member

    Messages:
    403
    State:
    Georgia
    Its not hard to see what the flatheads have done to the redbreast population in the Altamaha river here in Ga. The DNR have tried everything including putting ads in the local papers asking people to help shock them out (flatheads) on certain stretches of the river. I doubt you will ever see anything more than a bounty put on these.