Black Widow Spider?

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by derbycitycatman, May 28, 2006.

  1. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Was playing with my 2 year old nephew just a few minutes ago. We were digging up worms and just playing in the dirt. He flipped over an old bucket and started to reach inside. I looked in the bucket and had to snatch him away from it. Inside the bucket looked to be a black widow spider. It had the black shiny body and the red hourglass. But below the hourglass was another red mark like the start of another hourglass. I killed it and the eggs to be sure but was this a black widow???

    Im going to go out and get everything one could hide in and spray everything with poison. This scared the crap out of me knowing how close he came to getting bit.
     
  2. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    If you saw a red hour glass then most likely the answer is yes, it was a widow. I have probably killed 8 of em so far this month around the outside of my home here in Az. I sprayed an outdoor ant and critter spray that supposedly last up to 8 weeks. Might work for you.
     

  3. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    That could have been a bad bite for a two year old.
     
  4. rebelzgrl76

    rebelzgrl76 New Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    State:
    CO
    Yikes!!! That was a close call. Id spray and make sure to spray old buckets, tires and such lieing around either. That would've been bad for your nephew.
     
  5. onlyone

    onlyone New Member

    Messages:
    142
    State:
    SE Kansas
    I went out into the garage a last year bare-footed to get a hammer last year and I felt something squish under my foot. I looked down and it was a black widow. I had the red hourglass and everything. Kinda freaked me out. I didnt think we had those here in kansas but apparently we do lol.
     
  6. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    yeah id say it was a b widow you can tell a b widow by its shape as
    a web type spider (skinny legs) big abdomen.
    that and the shiney black with a red hour glass that was sure a widow.
    i had a widow and kept it in a jar and would put insects and other spiders in it with the widow always winning i then found a scorpian and thought
    the widow would be toast and it did get stung a few times but finally latched on and bit the scorpian inbetween the armor links in its underside of the tail and it actually beat the scorpion!!!
    i dont see many widows around here we are curswed with recluses
    anything in the garage has to be checked before you go stickin your dang hand in a glove or pail i hate those things
    i have rubber boots and rainsuits gloves etc and i gotta doa thourough
    look over before putting anything on.
    glad you caught that little fella before he got bit :crazy: .
     
  7. AllenM

    AllenM Guest

    Sounds like an Eastern Black Widow to me, and I know spiders. Sometimes they will have some extra red like that, or even less than a fully formed hourglass shape. Freequently back East they even have a red design on the back of the abdomen like the "Red Back" (a related species in Austrailia).

    Araneae: Theridiidae, Latrodectus mactans


    SIZE: About 1 1/2 inches (38mm) long, 1/4 inch (6.4mm) in diameter

    COLOR: Usually shiny black

    DESCRIPTION: The female is usually black with a red spot or hourglass- shaped mark on its round abdomen. The male usually has light streaks on its abdomen.

    HABITAT: Black widow spiders are common around wood piles, and are frequently encountered when homeowners carry firewood into the house. Also found under eaves, in boxes, outdoor toilets, meter boxes, and other unbothered places.

    LIFE CYCLE: Egg sacs are brown, papery, about ½ inch long and oval. They hold from 25 to 900 or more eggs, which have an incubation period of 20 days. Growth requires two to three months, with older females dying in autumn after egg laying.

    TYPE OF DAMAGE: The black widow is not aggressive. It will, however, bite instinctively when touched or pressed.

    CONTROL: Be very careful when working around areas where black widow spiders may be established. Take proper precautions-wear gloves and pay attention to where you are working. Black widow bites are sharp and painful, and the victim should go to the doctor immediately for treatment. To control the black widow, carefully remove all materials where they might hide. They can be cleaned out of an area simply by knocking down the webs, spiders, and round tan egg sacs with a stick and crushing them underfoot.
     
  8. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Thanks everybody, thats what I figured. He aint going back out there till I get it all cleaned up. We've dug plenty of worms and he's not afraid of any creepy crawlies so that makes me worry more. Just thinking about him picking one up is making me sick. The back yard will be free of sticks, leaves, buckets or anything else them things can hide in, thanks again everybody.
     
  9. AllenM

    AllenM Guest

    One more MAJOR place to look for them is, if you have a wooden fence, under the 2x4s in the corners at the top and bottom of the fence. They LOVE corners.
     
  10. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    Fear is a man made emotion for some. I have always had animals and critters since my oldest son was a baby. To this date, not even my daughter is afraid of snakes. In fact, she used to help me feed our boa. None of them were ever able to anywhere near the rattler though except when I was with them. The key is to teach them to respect animals that can hurt them just like anything else...
     
  11. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    We have a lot of them here in VA. Don't count on the spray poisons getting rid of them. They must eat the poison (Not Likely) or have it sprayed directly on them for it to work. I was the maintenance superintendant of a huge retirement facility here, The Elks National Home, and had a big spider problem since it was also a 220 acre farm. After trying all kinds of poisons and having the medical staff research it, we wound up calling in a state spider expert who told us the best way to keep the spider population down was to use a vacuum as often as possable and get up as many spiders and their eggs as we could. Considering there are an average of 60,000 spiders per acre, that's a never ending job. Like DRC said, never stick your hand in any dark place without first checking it for spiders. I guy here was on the news a few months ago after being bitten by a Recluse and it was pretty ugly. Just about all the flesh and muscle on his right arm was gone! he'll never be able to use it again.