Black River Questions

Discussion in 'SOUTH CAROLINA RIVERS TALK' started by blackrivertiger, May 7, 2008.

  1. blackrivertiger

    blackrivertiger New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    South Carolina
    I'm pretty new to this forum, I have only been looking for the past month or so but already have learned alot from some of you but was hoping to get some more specific feedback to improve my fishing. I live in charleston but primarily fish the black river. I have fished mainly from my dock and have had some decent success - PB 23 lbs. flat - fishing live brim.

    I just got my john boat running well and was hoping to fish more of the river but don't really know what to be looking for or what to fish. Any tips would be appreciated. Also wanted to say thanks to bill from sc and the others that I have already learned alot from.
     
  2. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    As I understand it, the Black has a good population of flatheads, and flathead fishing is really pretty basic. There are different ways of doing anything, but here's the basics according to JA:

    Flatheads love cover - they lay up in snags during the day, and hunt near them a lot at night. For fishing spots, one aproach is to find areas that are near good woody snags, but not IN them. I like to look for areas where a channel or a hole narrows down to form sort of a funnel or a chute, with some good woody cover along the side. Put live sunfish on the bottom near the cover any time from dusk until a couple of hours after dawn. Most of us fish with basically a "Carolina rig" with a sinker sliding on the main line, above a swivel and leader, then the hook. A lot of people love circle hooks, amny others like kahle hooks. If you have room to fish the fish a bit, then 20 pound mainline is fine. If a lot of snags are likely and you will have to keep a good fish away from cover, then you will need heavier tackle. For me a snelled 5/0 kahle with a 6-8 inch sunfish hooked through the nose (in the mouth and out the top of the nose) is just about perfect. Anchor in a good looking spot and scatter 2 or 3 or 4 baits around the boat, or...

    Many people like to pick a good looking hole and set up on a sandbar and make a night of it. This is a very enjoyable laid-back way to fish, but I find I get more fish if I stay mobile. I will pull up anchor and move if I don't get bit within about 30 to 45 minutes. Sometimes I only move a hundred yards. Other times I may go a mile or two. If you do this for a while you will learn where the fish like to hang out. On some rivers, though, it can be pretty scary trying to run around after dark (too many snags and bars, etc.), in which case you might be better off with the sandbar camp-out aproach.

    Good luck and please share how you do!
     

  3. blackrivertiger

    blackrivertiger New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    South Carolina
    JA, I appreciate your input. I had a very general idea but did not have all the details that you provided. I wanted to hear from someone that has had luck so when I gave it a try and if it didn't work I wouldn't be discouraged. I have not had much luck yet this year but I have not gone too much, but will get to go much more in the coming months. I would like to hear what people consider the best months for flats and/or blues and what are considered the slowest?
     
  4. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Like any other fishing (or anything else), nothing breeds success like success. For me it was real hard to sit and wait for fish until I caught a few - I just wasn't sure if I was doing things right... Once you catch a few and get some confidence, it gets easier. Flatheads still don't generally come by the dozens, but, at least in my opinion, there's nothing magic about them. Flatheads are good anytime from mid March through November in the SC low country. My favorite months are April, May, and October. Spring times generally brings good action with nice fish, and if you find the right deep holes where they pile up you can have a great time in the fall as the water cools!