Big Rivers at Night...

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by TheMick, Oct 15, 2008.

  1. TheMick

    TheMick New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Missouri
    I am planning my first trip on my new boat at night. I want to get out on the Missouri or the Mississippi. I need to get to where the big fish are. Anybody have any good tips for fishing the big rivers at night? Anything to worry about or look out for? I appreciate the help.
     
  2. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,694
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    first thing you want to watch out for is barges.dont anchor in between the channel markers at night.if the river is on a rize keep a sharp knife handy to cut the anchor rope in case a tree gets in it.
     

  3. misterwhisker

    misterwhisker New Member

    Messages:
    1,056
    State:
    T. Bowl
    get there b4 it gets dark, so you can get some what of a bareing on where your at, dont forget your spot light
     
  4. BEHITJ

    BEHITJ New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    Wentzville
    Watch for the ends of the wing dikes the tips of them are still somewhat under the water.My advice to you on your first time out you should maybe fish below Alton Dam on down so you can kinda see what you are doing with all the lights down through that area it's pretty lit up from the dam on down to the Missouri river.
     
  5. joer

    joer New Member

    Messages:
    335
    State:
    columbiaMo
    what location do you plan on fishing? what part of the missouri?
     
  6. Hurricane

    Hurricane New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    Arnold, Missouri
    I've read a lot of good advice so far. When running try to stay in the main channel between the buoys to avoid hitting a wing dike, you will be suprised how far out they actually go. Also make sure you have a spotlight on to keep from hitting debris in the water and that will also help you spot wing dikes and other structure since you will be pretty far from the bank if you are running between the buoys. Also keep an eye for those asain carp when you get below those wing dikes, they can knock you out of the boat. And keep an eye on the current when you are by those dikes, it goes in some strange directions sometimes. We usually look for holes behind the dikes and also fish from the ends of the dike.
     
  7. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Slow down a little too. No need to run full throttle in the dark, just asking for trouble. Try a full moon night the first time, it will help to ease your fears a bit. You can see pretty well on a clear full moon night if you don't ruin your night vision. GPS mapping on your fishfinder is a great tool also.

    Plus, DO NOT anchor in the channel, bad idea.
     
  8. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,447
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Corey,
    I assume you are not doing this alone?
    Make sure that whoever is with you is a seasoned river fisherman.
    You say this is a new boat, are you new to boating in general? If so maybe you should get more hours under belt. If you are not new to boating just make sure you are as prepared as you can be, wear your PFD and heed the advice already given.
    Good luck, be safe...W
     
  9. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,081
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    Double check your nav and running lights,batteries should be fully charged before going out, carry spare bulbs, electrical tape
     
  10. bhos

    bhos New Member

    Messages:
    9
    State:
    Wentzville, MO
    Don't forget the cell phone, and make sure its batteries are charged. You might ask for some numbers from some of the folks here in case you get in a bad way and need help. I recall reading a post on here about someone getting stuck on the river at night (engine died) in view of the ramp, they called 911 and it took over 3 hours for water patrol to get to them.
     
  11. joer

    joer New Member

    Messages:
    335
    State:
    columbiaMo
    i know when i run on the missouri in the dark the deepest part of the river is the rock side along the bank. i guess the biggest part of river fishing is safety the rest is just locating fishing on your graph.b safe!
     
  12. TheMick

    TheMick New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks to everyone for all the help. I definitely have picked up a lot of good info from everyone. I am planning on going out this weekend and I will remember all the good advice.
     
  13. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Big Mo is different than the Miss. The Mo uses primarily bank markers (daymarks) for channel reference, where the Miss is bouyed off like a highway. There are bouys on the MO, but not nearly as regular as on the Mississippi. A spotlight and good understanding of the daymark system is a must on the Missouri. Spotlight is a must on both, but since your primary nav markers might be on the bank a mile up from you on the MO, you need a spotlight to see them at night. Also, as noted, make sure all your nav lights are working and give barges even more leeway than you would during the day.

    The Mo is also considerably narrower and shallower than the Miss, so you can run out of room quicker on the MO than you think you might if you're moving along at a good clip after dark.

    The other big thing to watch out for is the boogey man. I've found that staying away from overhanging trees reduces my fear of him considerably. Also, as Skip said, the full moon seems to keep him at bay more than on nights with a new moon in addition to providing light to navigate by. I've never actually seen the boogey man, but I know I've heard him quite a bit. My buddies try to tell me it's just beavers or raccoons, but I know a scary, supernatural monster when I hear it moving around the bank at night near my boat.

    As everyone knows, the boogey man primarily feeds on dead and rotting fish when he can't find fishermen, so keeping your bait in a well sealed container will help keep him away. Again, some people tell me it's just raccoons attracted to the smell of fish making that noise in the trees, but I ain't buying it. I've had many long nights on the river to think about this and I'm pretty sure I'm right.

    Also, the sound of empty beverage cans being tossed in the bilge scares the boogey man - I try make this noise at regular, short intervals in case he's sneaking up on me. This is a tricky gambit - making this noise too much can either lead to a dulling of the senses needed to avoid him (beer cans) or outright paranoia and hallucinations (Mountain Dew or Red Bull cans).:big_smile:

    All kidding aside, be safe, check your gear, recon the area you're going to be fishing while it's light out, and save a safe track and waypoints off on GPS if available. I'm primarily nocturnal from May through September and to me there ain't a better place to be during the heat of summer than anchored off in the river somewhere listening to the current humming by the hull and watching the moon on the rod eyes for a bite. Dang, that reminds me, how long is it till next August....:sad2: