big river question

Discussion in 'OHIO RIVERS TALK' started by ec43146, Jul 5, 2009.

  1. ec43146

    ec43146 New Member

    Messages:
    272
    State:
    Ohio
    I was curious what size boat motor is needed for the bigger rivers, not counting the Ohio. This would be a time when the river isn't high from rain and normal flow. Also do you think a trolling motor would be enough? Haven't had a lot of practice with my boat yet, thanks.
     
  2. bedbug jr

    bedbug jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,084
    State:
    Missouri
    I wouldn't recommend just a trolling motor on any body of water with a current, too many variables. Motor size would depend on boat size and displacement, but you certainly need something capable of moving against the current. Stay safe and enjoy!!!
     

  3. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I haved used a big trolling motor on a 14 foot jon boat on the scioto river.

    It did ok as long as the river was at normal flow.....

    Problem was I just never really trusted it...cause if the battery went dead I was screwed..but one day we took it about 3 miles down stream, and 3 miles up stream, it worked fine..Just make sure you have a qualty battery, fully charged...And I would not go below a 36-lb thrust, even bigger would be better.

    If you have a small boat, a small out board even a 5hp will work ok on our inland rivers.
     
  4. hunterhnc20

    hunterhnc20 New Member

    Messages:
    153
    State:
    Buffalo, West V
    I agree that you need a gas motor. Boat size and type will probally determine the motor size. But you dont need much really. My cousin had a 24 ft pontoon and we would have 4 people plus all our gear and all the other junk you think might need on it and it only had a 40 hp on it. It would take you where ever you wanted to go. Id guess around 12 to 15 mph. I have a 24 ft pontoon with a 75 hp and with all the junk, gear, and 3 people at 4500 rpm it runs 23 mph.
     
  5. Hoopie

    Hoopie New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Ohio
    Personally I wouldn't go with anything under a small block v-8:wink:

    Nah for real you need something that will push your load thru current.I have seen motors as small as a couple HP on the big river, in normal conditions. If you are in water where hitting bottom is no concern get the biggest one you can afford that your boat is rated for. Be safe out there.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    Ed, stay away from "trolling " only. Yes you can do it most nights, but one time you'll be on the river when the rains come and you won't be able to get back. I actually, one time, had to pull my boat upstream by the bow rope for 2 miles walking in thigh deep water. Then I ran into complications. just don't go without a motor and an electric back-up. If you choose to go the trolling route anyway, lol. please inform us of all you're misfortunes. It'll give us so much pleasure.
     
  7. Hoopie

    Hoopie New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Ohio
    Yes if you go the electric route only have another truck stationed at the next bridge down river so IF and WHEN something goes wrong you can get out safely. If you spend enough time on the water things do go wrong, even with a gas motor. Break downs ,dead batterys, capsizing after hitting a log, clogged fuel filter, jet sucks up debris and gets clogged, etc......
     
  8. recordbreakin1

    recordbreakin1 New Member

    Messages:
    746
    State:
    texas
    I use a 14 ft. lfat bottom on the river and a good running 9.9 or so will be ok as long as the current is not to bad.You can use a trolling motor I have befroe I take 2 batteries just in cas one goes dead.Be safe out there any water can get bad real quick.
     
  9. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    I have done it before with just a trolling motor, but I would not suggest it. If you want to just use a trolling motor I would suggest start off by going up river as far as possible and then just drift down and bring some oars just in case. We used to do this with a canoe all the time we would start off by going up river in the morning and let the river take us back home. We really only used the oars for navigation and the river did all the work. We would tie off along the way and fish.
     
  10. Slatebar

    Slatebar New Member

    Messages:
    992
    State:
    ohio
    If you look there should be a tag attached to your boat with Max Rated HP. I have always found that around 60-75% of the max is ideal for me. But what suits me may not suit your needs.