Big cats and trot lines?

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by vandellchuck, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. vandellchuck

    vandellchuck New Member

    Messages:
    32
    State:
    Illinois
    So i have this bright idea to take a trot line and rig it with bluegill for some big flathead or blues. Has anyone tried this? Ive used trot lines with smaller hooks and bait for some channels but never tried it for the bigens
     
  2. bobbymills222

    bobbymills222 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    Texas
    Chuck, I fish for Flatheads down here in Texas this time of year. I place my line in the deepest holes available and bait it with bluegill or goldfish. I check my line every other day, because I have had more luck letting it set a day or two, seems bigger fish are more finicky this time of year. Place your stagens (hooks) close to bottom (1 foot or less) to catch flatheads and a little higher (3 foot at least) off bottom to catch blues. Run your line at least every other day, because big fish will die quick if left hooked to long as oxygen is not real great at the bottom this time of year.Good luck.
     

  3. catpound

    catpound New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Illinois
    there are a ton of ways to possibly rig up a trot line. check out the library under "jugs, trotlines and limblines". I have not set a ton of trot lines and am fairly new to it but I have had some success. The easiest way I have found is to tie off to a stump or tree by the bank and pull your trot line out to deeper water using a weight at the other end. There are a ton of things to learn when setting out your first few lines expecially in deeper water. Keep in mind that when you are checking in deep water it can be difficuilt if your line is set up where you plan on pulling your weight up. Not alot of fun pulling up a bunch of hooks while having a heavy weight at the end of the line. Be safe and I like to always have a knife handy in case someone gets hooked and the line needs cut.

    No one way is the best. Take everyones opinions and the posts in the library and find what works best for you.

    BE SAFE AND GOOD LUCK !!!
     
  4. oakland river rat

    oakland river rat New Member

    Messages:
    33
    State:
    Topeka,Kansas
  5. David Knotts

    David Knotts New Member

    Messages:
    2,569
    State:
    Bossier City, La
  6. David Knotts

    David Knotts New Member

    Messages:
    2,569
    State:
    Bossier City, La
    In the early part of the year, when the gills first bed up, I like to set my lines in shallow water, as close to deep water as I can get, I caught a 60# op this past spring in 5 feet of water, with a 14/o circle hook, with a gill that was about a pound. I have caught several ops in the same place, this year. As soon as I know the gills are beddin up is when I start settin out my lines. hope this helps.
     
  7. big-muddy

    big-muddy New Member

    Messages:
    1,834
    State:
    norfolk, va
    just remember that gills are sportfish in illinois and they have to be taken by hook to be used for bait. conservation police are good folks, but sometimes are not friendly:wink:
     
  8. The J-Man!

    The J-Man! New Member

    Messages:
    321
    State:
    St.Paul, MN
  9. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    we had too many straightened hooks while using coventional trotline methods when we targeted big yellas. we changed out method to tying one end solid on tree or stump with tractor tire intertube to the structure and then ran the other end to large floating log or limber tree limb/root. this worked good for us and fixed the straightened hook problem. The other problem we had was that the yellas would sometimes manage to twist off the line as we were checking them. We have not had that problem since we started limblineing and jugging instead
     
  10. barrelbritches

    barrelbritches New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    Texas
    I am here in texas and been fishing for the big one for years useing troling and jug lines. Here the law is 25 hookes lines . I use large bait what ever i can catch (perch carp shad pollies) .Early spring and late fall set lines shallows 4 to 10 ft on a hard surface road beds ,old drill sites,or any other hard bottom. Shallow water 1ft stangen deep water 2ft stangen. In the heat of summer go deep holes with curent. Run lines ever other day watch bait if dead no oxgen will have to move to another place. I use trees of the edge of a channel , shallow tree to tree , no trees avilable use weights to hold line .Hope that helps
     
  11. pat muckelroy

    pat muckelroy New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    texas
    I fish rivers and lakes for big yellow cat and use trot lines in the summer and spring. I have probably done everything wrong that can be done, so I will tell you how I rig my lines now.
    I use heavy braided green line for the main line. 1/4" is not too big as its easier on your hands and it is not going to break when you are pulling on it and send a hook in you. I use heavy swivels, the best I can get, as nothing is worse than pulling up a big yellow and have a swivel pull the end out of it. I use short stagings, no longer than 16". Three foot stagings just let them wrap around the underwater tree stumps more times. I use 14/0 circle hooks with big live perch and I change bait every day. My stagings are made from 300lb test braided green line. I sharpen every hook and inspect the line before every use. This may be overkill on the way I build my line, but I don't loose fish anymore.
    I set my lines above the thermocline in lakes during the summer. I look for sunken timber on the sides of old creek beds or tanks. I never set my lines where they won't get hung up. If you want the big fish, go to the brush under the water. I set my lines in rivers in big brush piles or big snag areas that are around a hole.
    I always try to set lines that won't get in the way of other bass fisherman. I don't like to try to retreve cut lines. I tie my lines under the water where they are not visible to other fisherman. There is always someone waiting to get a free line. I put a 5lb weight on the line 10' from where I tied the line if I want to fish 10' deep. I do the same thing with the other end. This keeps the bass fisherman happy, the thieves mad because they can't see your line unless they are right on top of it, and it gives flexiablity to the line that keeps the cats from pulling and twisting off. Good luck,Pat Muckelroy
     
  12. vandellchuck

    vandellchuck New Member

    Messages:
    32
    State:
    Illinois
    Thanks alot for evryones advise! i really appriciate it.