Best time for deep water blue catfish

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by catchaser1, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. catchaser1

    catchaser1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,180
    State:
    Anderson S.C.
    what is the best time to fish deep water for blues, by deep I mean 60'-100'? I know some people catch them shallow all year, and deep, whats the best time in you all"s opinion? Mainly talking about fishing humps, ditches and ledges in the local lake, that drop off to these depths.
     
  2. Tomahawk

    Tomahawk New Member

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    1,015
    State:
    NC
    I usally start catching blues in deepwater after a lake turns over, usally in the falltime. Something you have to consider when fishing that deep. The fish wouldn't be in those areas usless theres some kind of food close by. The deepest I've caught blues was at 60'. Theres probley not much of a food supply in that dep water. Unless your fishing a deep river, where food can come down river to them.
     

  3. catchaser1

    catchaser1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,180
    State:
    Anderson S.C.
    Thanks, that makes alot of sense, never thought of it like that
     
  4. dougc

    dougc Active Member

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    1,709
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    Independen
    The thermocline in the summer (in a lake) will dictate the deepest that "some" of the fish will be.
     
  5. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    I am just beginning to explore fishing for blues in deeper water. The bottom line is that I am basically ignorant about it. I have caught them on Lake Norman with LakeNormanBlues suspended at around 35-40 feet in 60-80 feet of water. These fish were just above the thermocline and there to feed on the shad kill in the summer. As that time approaches here in a few weeks I will be dedicating some time to fishing this set-up more.

    My home lake is not that deep. The upper reaches of the lake where most blues are caught is basically in the 30-40 foot range and there is no thermocline present. Bait schools are present in various depths depending on the conditions in the deeper waters, and I would bet that fish can be caught in relation to these bait schools. Personally, I have not dedicated much time to pursuing this method of catching blues in the summer, and no one else has to my knowledge.

    Deep water fishing, in my opinion, is tricky. The thermocline in many lakes makes really deep water an uninhabital environment for fish. My belief is that the fish in really deep water are not actively feeding, especially in the absence of bait fish. That does not mean they can not be caught. Putting bait in front of them as an easy meal will put fish in the boat, but I would not expect a feeding frenzy and lots of catches.

    The key, I think, is knowing and using your electronics to the max.

    Tomahawk makes a valid point about bait fish. In the absence of bait fish, I would bet that the fish in these deeper waters are not actively feeding, but there because of comfortable water temps, pH, etc. With less oxygen at these depths I would bet it is not comfortable for the fish to actively pursue food, but again, they will take the opportunity to sieze an easy meal if offered.
     
  6. RiverratSC

    RiverratSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,646
    State:
    Gaffney, SC
    Some lakes you can do well year round in deep water. Take Lake Monticello here in South Carolina, you can catch nice size blues all year.
     
  7. roundhill

    roundhill New Member

    Messages:
    810
    State:
    kings mtn
    i have cought blues over 100ft not to say they all go that deep but every lake or river system will and are not alike you have to adapt to where they are at and yes they are agressive when they are deep if you catch them deep most will need to be burped when released and blues will be shallow in the same lake at the same time.now thats what i call info.lol
     
  8. flatheadhunterx

    flatheadhunterx Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    South Carolina
    I don't think cats are as sensitive to the thermo line as other fish are. A area on hartwell where I like to drift alot is around 45 to 50 ft deep large flat with a few humps and the river channel that is maybe 60 ft deep. I have seen the thermoclime set up around 30 ft deep and had fish and bait suspended right above it and have done better drifting baits on the bottom than fishing baits suspended above the line.