best lake in oklahoma to fish at?

Discussion in 'OKLAHOMA LAKES / RESERVOIRS' started by melstangman1967, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. melstangman1967

    melstangman1967 New Member

    Messages:
    166
    State:
    missouri
    where does everybody think the best lake to fish at is and how did u do there?
     
  2. ronlyn239

    ronlyn239 New Member

    Messages:
    270
    State:
    Bartlesvil
    There is as many lakes as there are opinions. Good Blue Cat lakes are Grand, Oologah, Kaw, and Keystone, along with the Lock and Dam system on the Arkansas. Lots of choices, all good.
     

  3. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    This is really a loaded question. The load being, what kind of fishing are you looking for? What kind of fish, what size???

    Oolagah and the Verdigris river, Grand, Keystone and the Arkansas/Cimmaron River, and Kaw are probably the best for blues, with Grand and the 3 rivers having the largest.

    For Striped bass, hybrids, and white bass, Eufalla, Keystone, Skiatook and Sooner.

    Sooner also has large blues, just not a large number of them.

    Flatheads, Ft Cobb, Eufalla, Keystone, and Grand all have good numbers of larger flats. I know Eufalla has had many taken out of it that are 70+

    Best crappie? Grand some years, Eufalla, Keystone, Skiatook, Carl Blackwell, Oolagah, and Sooner all have great populations of crappie.

    But, as for my personal opinion, the best all around lake in Oklahoma is Keystone with it's 2 tributaries the Arkansas and Cimmaron rivers.
     
  4. gottagetabigun

    gottagetabigun New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    OKLAHOMA
    eufaula to me is the one. you can limit on crappie, blues and catch some big flatheads. one of the best things about it is you don't have near as many people out skiing, jet skiing.... as you do most other lakes in oklahoma. it also runs about 40 miles long. thats a lot of water.
     
  5. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    See, the ones who answered your question are somewhat like the Yankee Oklahoman's. None of them mentioned Texhoma, which probably produces more fish than all of the otheres combined. People usually don't look all over the place for a lake, but go to the closest.
     
  6. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    No, I don't count texhoma as being a lake as it is shared with, eeewwweeee, TEXAS
    :confused2: :crazy: :roll_eyes:
     
  7. Phil Washburn

    Phil Washburn New Member

    Messages:
    7,680
    State:
    Shawnee OK

    that would have to be the lake i am on at that time.....whether with Darryl(skipeye) or Mike Magill...............the company and the outdoors is the most important:big_smile:
     
  8. melstangman1967

    melstangman1967 New Member

    Messages:
    166
    State:
    missouri
    where do y'all fish at in ok what lakes and where
     
  9. gottagetabigun

    gottagetabigun New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    OKLAHOMA
    actually there are several lakes closer to me than eufaula. keystone,gibson,hudson and all the small lakes such as skiatook,birch....and i have fished all of them except birch. i know texoma is a great lake but i have never fished it. eufaula to me is the best in my experiances. p.s. i ain't no yankee. my grandpa was from alabama and my grandma from mississippi.
     
  10. zimzam

    zimzam New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    This might help you too. The dept of wildlife is giving way free Water Atlas books that cover a lot of lakes with a lot of info in it. I pick one up today and it is very well put together and well made. Best of all it's free. You can also have it mailed to your house for 6 bucks.
     
  11. South Grand Laker

    South Grand Laker New Member

    Messages:
    723
    State:
    Oklahoma
    where would i pick some up at???
     
  12. Longhunter

    Longhunter New Member

    Messages:
    43
    State:
    Kansas
    From the OK.Dept.Of Wildlife
    Where to get them at bottom of page.

    New Oklahoma Water Atlas offered free to the public
    Whether your idea of fun is setting up in a duck blind at first light, an afternoon of water-skiing or catching a big bass as the sun sets, you need one thing – water, and lots of it. And thanks to the new Oklahoma Water Atlas, it is now easier than ever to decide where to go next to pursue your favorite hobby on the water.
    The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB), with support from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, has produced the most useful water-related publication to come off the presses in years. The new Oklahoma Water Atlas includes 146 detailed lake maps containing comprehensive recreational information, such as boat ramps, water depths, road maps and other important features.
    “This free publication is certainly a book that every angler and boater will want to have,” said Barry Bolton, chief of fisheries for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “There is really a wealth of information in the book from groundwater maps to historical rainfall statistics to the history of fishing in Oklahoma .”
    The book’s 190 pages and 11” x 14” size is packed full of color maps and images.
    “ Oklahoma is blessed with so many unique water resources,” said Brian Vance, director of information for the OWRB. “What’s special about the Water Atlas is that it showcases our many lakes and rivers all in one book.”
    The book was created by the Water Board, and published in partnership with the Wildlife Department, which provided funds through the Sport Fish Restoration program grant number F-76-O. Fishing tackle as well as boat trolling motors and fishing-related equipment are subject to special federal excise taxes that help fund conservation efforts around the country. Additionally, federal fuel taxes attributed to motorboats are directed toward conservation.
    The federal government collects these taxes from manufacturers, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service administers and disburses the funds to state fish and wildlife agencies such as the Wildlife Department. Anglers and boaters ultimately pay these taxes through the purchase of products. These same groups benefit from the funds as states must spend the money on fishing and boating-related projects.
    “The Oklahoma Water Atlas is a great example of a Sport Fish Restoration Program project,” Bolton said. “I’m confident this book will greatly improve the access to information anglers and boaters need to spend a weekend at the lake with their family.”
    Sport Fish Restoration funds are used by the Wildlife Department for a wide range of other important activities, including the construction of fish hatcheries, research laboratories, managing fish populations and educating young anglers.
    The Oklahoma Water Resources Board was created in 1957 and now directs staff in many areas, including the administration of permits for the beneficial use of stream and groundwater, studies of the quality and quantity of water resources, oversight of nonfederal dam safety, encouragement of responsible floodplain management, monitoring of stream flows and groundwater levels, administration of loans and grants to communities to assist in the construction of water and wastewater facilities, identification of pollution sources, and restoration of water quality. Late last year, the OWRB also initiated the update of the Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan, which will be completed in 2011.
    Individuals can pick up a free Water Atlas at the Wildlife Department headquarters located at 1801 N. Lincoln in Oklahoma City or at the OWRB’s Oklahoma City office, 3800 N. Classen Blvd , 73118. Water Atlases may also be picked up any of the four OWRB branch offices: Lawton, 601 "C" Avenue, Suite 101, (580)248-7762; Tulsa, State Agencies Building, 440 S. Houston, Room 2, (918)581-2924; McAlester, 321 S. 3rd St. Suite 5, (918)426-5435; and Woodward, 2411 Williams Avenue, Suite 116, (580)256-1014
    To have a book mailed to your home, send a $6 check or money order (for postage and handling) made payable to “OWRB” to Oklahoma Water Resources Board Main Office 3800 N. Classen Oklahoma City, OK 73118.
    For more information about the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, log on to owrb.ok.gov. For more information about the fishing in Oklahoma , log on to the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

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